Change Ad Consent OT: - Baseball is screwed! | Page 8 | The Boneyard

OT: Baseball is screwed!



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There's no way to protect the old and sick if we send kids back to school, because many older and sick people live with kids in the house.
I'm talking about baseball here but yes that's a better argument for shutting down schools than saying it's about saving the kids.
 
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I'm saying take all the smart precautions but we shouldn't be canceling things when there are some positive tests. It's going to happen and if you listen to the docs it's going to happen for years. The overhwhelming majority of young people who have it are fine, this should have been about protecting the old and sick from day 1.
No. It should have been about a collective shutdown from day 1 where everyone cooperated and worked together like in Europe. Short term pain for long term benefit. Sadly we are too divided for that simple task and that ship has sailed. Now we are down the rabbit hole and opening schools and playing baseball, even with every precaution, will facilitate the spread and endanger the old and sick. While the old and sick are certainly the most vulnerable, doctors and scientist are still trying to figure out what exactly makes some otherwise healthy people far more sick and vulnerable than others. Is it viral load? Blood type? Other unknown genetic makeup or characteristic of a subgroup? We still don't know for sure why some people are more vulnerable than others.
 
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Read post #127. Returning to school could be more detrimental
Considering mental health in an either/or fashion is a gross misapplication of mental health. The problem with the arguments in that post, which are valid, is that it's presented in a "Well, the effects of being in school are also bad, so we HAVE to keep them home." That's the wrong approach to the problem.

Both sending kids to school and keeping them home can create mental health issues. In both instances, interventions in the form of discussions/learnings/classes will be necessary to treat the different but equally important mental health effects of whatever physical situation the school chooses.

Whether in school or at home, the mental health of students must be an essential component of curriculum - that's how you solve the problem. Not by trying to run away from it and keep everyone at home under a vague premise of "But it's worse if we send them there!" and ignoring the negative effects of the other option.
 

Mr. French

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The thing about closing things down that people seem to be either not accounting for (my opinion) or just flat out missing as a major point is that too many people in our country have proven to be incapable of safely managing this thing on their own... if everyone was safe and doing the right things to manage it, I'd agree, shutting things down isn't a necessity.

When you have chuckle heads doing whatever they want in the name of freedom, rights or just flat out selfish behavior or lack of understanding the seriousness, then it gets out of control and spreads like wildfire. My opinion is in that specific situation, unfortunately, you need to do what NY and CT has done which is FORCE people to act smartly, in the name of public health.

If I trusted our citizens to do the right things like I used to, and also trusted our federal government to lead people in the right ways ethically and safely, then this is a much different conversation.
 

fleudslipcon

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Everyone's talking about deaths but ignoring potential long term issues outside of death. Between Eduardo Rodriguez on the Sox and this study below, that seems short-sighted until more information is available.

Couple that w/ this experience: Yale New Haven lung clinic brings diverse expertise to COVID patients

Hard to nail down long term effects in novo coronavirus still being learned about.
@superjohn you have raised some compelling concerns to support your position why you feel children should return to school.

Please read posts 166 and 169.

This virus has some similarities to the flu virus. However the links in posts 166 and 169 support the message hospital doctors treating Covid patients have been saying from the beginning. They have never seen tissue and organ reactions from a virus like they are observing from Covid-19.

You were a cigarette smoker. You quit. I presume you took that action because of health concerns. Hopefully they are not present now but you are being proactive to avoid the negative health impacts that science has demonstrated occurs from smoking.

Science has not had the time to investigate this virus to the same degree as cigarettes. This virus is a virus that we can already project will keep on giving.

We have evidence of a virus in HPV that has short and long term impacts with the long term impact of it causing cervical cancer being far more serious than the STD.

It is wonderful that kids are to a very large extent not getting very sick or dying in the present. And hopefully that will always be the case. I am not confident about this.

I would need proof that the virus is not remaining in their cells and can be activated at a future time when that X factor or factors (we have theories but not “definitive” answers) that prevents severe reactions is gone.
 

fleudslipcon

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The thing about closing things down that people seem to be either not accounting for (my opinion) or just flat out missing as a major point is that too many people in our country have proven to be incapable of safely managing this thing on their own... if everyone was safe and doing the right things to manage it, I'd agree, shutting things down isn't a necessity.

When you have chuckle heads doing whatever they want in the name of freedom, rights or just flat out selfish behavior or lack of understanding the seriousness, then it gets out of control and spreads like wildfire. My opinion is in that specific situation, unfortunately, you need to do what NY and CT has done which is FORCE people to act smartly, in the name of public health.

If I trusted our citizens to do the right things like I used to, and also trusted our federal government to lead people in the right ways ethically and safely, then this is a much different conversation.
If the selection of the presidential candidates in 2016 is any indication than we might be better off without education. The sad thing is I’m only partly joking.

And for the record @August_West I want to clarify a position I made about climate change which I got the impression bothered you. Perhaps you don’t remember. I bring it up only because the position I took in a debate regarding climate change is consistent with my post in 182. If you don’t recall the gist of that position I won’t say more.
 
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If the selection of the presidential candidates in 2016 is any indication than we might be better off without education. The sad thing is I’m only partly joking.

And for the record @August_West I want to clarify a position I made about climate change which I got the impression bothered you. Perhaps you don’t remember. I bring it up only because the position I took in a debate regarding climate change is consistent with my post in 182. If you don’t recall the gist of that position I won’t say more.
Fleud I dont remember what I had for lunch.
 

HuskyHawk

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The thing about closing things down that people seem to be either not accounting for (my opinion) or just flat out missing as a major point is that too many people in our country have proven to be incapable of safely managing this thing on their own... if everyone was safe and doing the right things to manage it, I'd agree, shutting things down isn't a necessity.

When you have chuckle heads doing whatever they want in the name of freedom, rights or just flat out selfish behavior or lack of understanding the seriousness, then it gets out of control and spreads like wildfire. My opinion is in that specific situation, unfortunately, you need to do what NY and CT has done which is FORCE people to act smartly, in the name of public health.

If I trusted our citizens to do the right things like I used to, and also trusted our federal government to lead people in the right ways ethically and safely, then this is a much different conversation.
It's back in Spain now. Will be back in other parts of Europe too. Cases rising in MA now. The rest of the northeast will see increases in the late summer and fall. Wait until college opens up and people from all over go to new places.

The idea was 15 days to flatten the curve. It's now over 150 days. Somehow the initial premise: "let's not overwhelm our hospitals" turned into "lets quarantine until this goes away or there is a cure". I continue to believe what I believed then, it has to run through the population. There isn't any other outcome. This will probably be with us for the rest of our lives. Maybe there is a vaccine, but a vaccine doesn't prevent you from contracting it, it just helps you fight it off. Already treatment is much better than it was in the spring and is improving. As we get to the point where treatment is a little better still (Nitric Oxide maybe), we need to just shelter the truly at risk and otherwise live normal lives. I'm doing all the "right things", but humans were never designed to live this way. Modern society isn't set up to do this for very long.

NFL players opting out of the season in pretty significant numbers. You can bet the situation with the Marlins is driving that in part.
 
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Read post #127. Returning to school could be more detrimental
Ah yes, the celebrity testimonial. I think a quick google search could yield all sorts of varying opinions on the Psychological implications of long-term remote learning. I see that you at least acknowledge the possibility that we are doing more harm than good for our children.
 
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Ah yes, the celebrity testimonial. I think a quick google search could yield all sorts of varying opinions on the Psychological implications of long-term remote learning. I see that you at least acknowledge the possibility that we are doing more harm than good for our children.
I have a 4 year old so I'm living this. She is hurt she can't see/ play with her friend from school.
 
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If the selection of the presidential candidates in 2016 is any indication than we might be better off without education. The sad thing is I’m only partly joking.

And for the record @August_West I want to clarify a position I made about climate change which I got the impression bothered you. Perhaps you don’t remember. I bring it up only because the position I took in a debate regarding climate change is consistent with my post in 182. If you don’t recall the gist of that position I won’t say more.
The funny thing is that neither the one that took over in 2016 or the one running against were any treats but we did get it right in the situation. The one prior sucked too so it hasn't been a good run for our country but the only way to at least not be embarrassing completely as a country is to stand pat. Sad thing is I am not joking :rolleyes:

As far as Covid man I just like reading everyone's opinion and some of the "facts" thrown out here. I have none because I just don't know anything more than this is the craziest of times in my 60 year run, just totally whacked.
 
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God, what a stupid line of thinking.

You can die driving to work. You can also increase that risk driving recklessly, driving drunk, driving fast or driving blindfolded. Life isn't risk free but you can also MANAGE some risk. Anyone who throws logic to the wind and says "Oh well! I could die driving a car." is a fool.
You can manage your risk of getting skin cancer to nearly 0 if you never leave your house and stay away from your windows. Of course you arguably would not have a life that is much worth living.
 
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Well let’s just say I remember your position on the matter and although I didn’t indicate it at the time I am in agreement for the most part with that position.

And if you can’t remember what you had for lunch than it’s obvious you did not go to Arby.
totally didn’t have Arby’s but this time next week I’ll be in a Midwest Arby’s so stay tuned For “ lunch thread with Adub”
 
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The states that seem to be getting the worst of it this summer also seem to be the states that were doing the best in the spring. I would wager they will again be the states that are doing the best once the fall rolls around. It really is indoor living in the summer months in those states, and the air conditioned spaces are I think a breeding ground for the spread of respiratory viruses. I think the weather as much as anything else is the culprit.
 
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It's back in Spain now. Will be back in other parts of Europe too. Cases rising in MA now. The rest of the northeast will see increases in the late summer and fall. Wait until college opens up and people from all over go to new places.
A bit of overstatement and jumping to conclusions. Cases in MA are not actually confirmed to be rising, despite what some alarmists claim. 7-day weighted test positivity has hovered between 1.7% and 2% for over a month, number of hospitalized patients continues to trend down, and 3-day weighted deaths continues slight downward trend for last 30 days.

There's no confirmation that the rest of the northeast "will" see increases later this summer and fall.

As states begin to adopt better public health measure enforcement strategy, the situation can improve. Rather than targeting entire sectors of an economy (shut all gyms, all restaurants, etc.) instead target and shut down those who aren't complying. If there's confirmed evidence via contact tracing that a specific sector is causing large rates of infection, then shut it down.

There's increasing evidence that the upticks in certain parts of the northeast are tied to specific events that aer often private, not broad-range sectors. For instance, these fools who operated a party boat in Boston got a cease and desist order. There's the absurd Chainsmokers concert in the Hamptons. There was a house party on Cape Cod that turned into a cluster.

In states like ours where the numbers were effectively brought down very low, one of the key ways to prevent them from rising are stamping out the individual egregious violations rather than applying one-size-fits-all solutions that have broad economic detrimental impact. They also breed support from the public of public health measures. The outcry up here over the boat party + cease and desist has been overwhelmingly negative for the company, not government officials. Same thing for the Chainsmokers concert. They're getting ripped to shreds on the internet for playing that show.
 
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Are any of the Marlins sick or did they just test positive?

I've checked and haven't seen this covered in any article.
 
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Are any of the Marlins sick or did they just test positive?

I've checked and haven't seen this covered in any article.
It’s been reported by a MLB beat guy that not all the players are asymptomatic...
 

Mr. French

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SMH.
Truly baffled how anyone, regardless of prior political affiliation, can have that opinion. I know plenty that do, unfortunately some that are very close to me, and it just literally confuses me to no end.

He also said the only way to not BECOME completely embarrassing as a country is to stand pat. Whewwww.
 
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A bit of overstatement and jumping to conclusions. Cases in MA are not actually confirmed to be rising, despite what some alarmists claim. 7-day weighted test positivity has hovered between 1.7% and 2% for over a month, number of hospitalized patients continues to trend down, and 3-day weighted deaths continues slight downward trend for last 30 days.
Who knows where we go from here. But in MA per the COVID dashboard you linked, there have been 0 deaths related to this under age 20. And looks like 51 deaths under age 40. The average age of death from COVID in MA is 82. On the flip side, we (MA) now have the highest unemployment rate in the country which comes with its own set of problems both economic and health wise. A vaccine will not make this go away. I have no idea what the answer is and if there is a balance. If ONE death is too many from this (and I've lost 2 relatives to this thing) then we are going to be in this state of being for years and years. Hypothetical - what if we completely lock down for like 90 days. The virus dissipates but then in April three kids at UConn (or some large school) test positive and have been at parties, sporting events, classes, lunch, dinner, etc. Do we send everyone home from school or lock them down where they are for 3 weeks?
 
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