OT: Best Pizza in CT

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If your choice of restaurant can make the mushrooms as they should then by all means 'shrooms are good on a pie. Same with pepperoni, if they have the smaller curved and charred slices I'm all in, usually request them to be burnt a bit. Then a good sausage, that's the only other topping I consider. Otherwise muzzy only or plain if it's a New Haven place. My fav is shrooms and pepperoni. There's actually a place here in western mass that can kill it on those toppings although the overall isn't my favorite it passes enough to grab one a month. LOL
I love a good white clam pie on occasion, Pepe's, Modern, and Zupp's all make great white clam pies. I would skip Sally's on the white clam, or tell them beforehand to give it a lite bake.

 
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ClifSpliffy

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local jacques pepin introduced his kid to shrooms by going out in their yard, and snatching some for dinner. we don't do that despite a pantload of them all around here . something, something, guess wrong you die, I suppose. I'll eat any culinary shrooms offered to me, but full disclosure, I luv, luv, luv the basic canned button mushroom, and always have a case hanging around, in case a dish calls for them. like almost any savory dish.
 

Hans Sprungfeld

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local jacques pepin introduced his kid to shrooms by going out in their yard, and snatching some for dinner. we don't do that despite a pantload of them all around here . something, something, guess wrong you die, I suppose. I'll eat any culinary shrooms offered to me, but full disclosure, I luv, luv, luv the basic canned button mushroom, and always have a case hanging around, in case a dish calls for them. like almost any savory dish.
Is a "pantload of mushrooms" anything like an "exaltation of larks" or a "murder of crows?"
 

Hans Sprungfeld

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If I were to use the term "breadier" to describe a pizza, that pie would be as far from Roseland's as could be imagined. Roseland's niche is thin and crispy (the rest of my family thinks it's crispy to a fault), and to me, breadier brings to mind a thick, pan baked pie in the Sicilian mold.
How totally right you are:thin and crispy. I preferred the plain tomato to the sausage & cheese, though both good.

I'm now thinking that maybe a pie a few years back was thicker to support a lot of seafood on top when I went with a client for a late lunch.

My two-month survey is nearly complete. A fresh clam small pie from Zuppardi's remains on the list, perhaps on Saturday afternoon after CWOS Alternative Space at Yale West Campus and before a screening of "Pizza: A Love Story" at Whitneyville Commons. It's even possible that I could go to Olde World tomorrow to go along with Game 7. Or something completely different. Dunno.

Last Sunday, I ordered a sausage & mootz at Zuppardi's. They made it plain cheese by mistake, and had the correct one in the oven before letting me know of the error and then sending me home with both. After weeks of small pies finished in a single sitting, I enjoyed again having the experience of cold, room temp, and toaster oven leftovers.

My greatest impression of both Roseland and Zuppardi's was their friendliness. Yes, very good pizza, though neither transcendent...two more solid entries in the "No wonder they are beloved by their loyal locals" category, where my proximity-based go-to is Ernie's, with Grimaldi's as my backup when I want the milky fresh mozzarella of their "Brooklyn" pies.

PS - I read yesterday that Popeye's chicken sandwich returns on November 3rd, timed, I suppose so that Chick-fil-A employees can stop in on their day off.
 

RichZ

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How totally right you are:thin and crispy. I preferred the plain tomato to the sausage & cheese, though both good.
Just to add to your list, if you feel like trying my current 'go to' pie, stop at Salerno's in Stratford. Order a thin crust, 'Scamorza 47'. The sauce and cheese are their signature items from when the previous generation first opened their doors in 1947. The original pie was thicker and breadier (sound familiar?) but I prefer it on the thin crust. I wouldn't load it with a lot toppings. Let the unique cheese speak for itself!

PS - I read yesterday that Popeye's chicken sandwich returns on November 3rd, timed, I suppose so that Chick-fil-A employees can stop in on their day off.
A month ago, I might have been interested in this. But I have recently crossed Popeye's off the list after picking up a box of chicken on the way home from fishing, and finding it to be inedible (pink and spongy) when I got home. I wasn't about to drive 15 miles to bitch about the undercooked poultry, so I tossed it and bitched on the Popeye's customer service line. A week letter, I got an apologetic email. That's it. No refund. No coupons. Not even a "We hope nobody got sick from it." Just a "Oh, sorry about that, we'll notify the restaurant in question."
So yeah, Popeye's can stick their spicy chicken sandwich.
 

8893

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Just to add to your list, if you feel like trying my current 'go to' pie, stop at Salerno's in Stratford. Order a thin crust, 'Scamorza 47'. The sauce and cheese are their signature items from when the previous generation first opened their doors in 1947. The original pie was thicker and breadier (sound familiar?) but I prefer it on the thin crust. I wouldn't load it with a lot toppings. Let the unique cheese speak for itself!
I read this and wondered how we haven't discussed it here before. Then I thought we had. So I searched and saw that @zyron , you and I discussed it a few times, starting more than three years ago. It was his sense then that Salerno's had slipped, but maybe he needed this ordering tip from you. I will keep it in mind next time I go visit my folks. Nice to see mention of both Salerno's and Scamorza. Warms my heart because it harkens back to the very start of my love affair with pizza.
 

Hans Sprungfeld

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Just to add to your list, if you feel like trying my current 'go to' pie, stop at Salerno's in Stratford. Order a thin crust, 'Scamorza 47'. The sauce and cheese are their signature items from when the previous generation first opened their doors in 1947. The original pie was thicker and breadier (sound familiar?) but I prefer it on the thin crust. I wouldn't load it with a lot toppings. Let the unique cheese speak for itself!


A month ago, I might have been interested in this. But I have recently crossed Popeye's off the list after picking up a box of chicken on the way home from fishing, and finding it to be inedible (pink and spongy) when I got home. I wasn't about to drive 15 miles to bitch about the undercooked poultry, so I tossed it and bitched on the Popeye's customer service line. A week letter, I got an apologetic email. That's it. No refund. No coupons. Not even a "We hope nobody got sick from it." Just a "Oh, sorry about that, we'll notify the restaurant in question."
So yeah, Popeye's can stick their spicy chicken sandwich.
When I lived in north Bridgeport before circling back to New Haven, Salerno's filled that 'local' slot I keep referring to. The dining room was fixed in the 70's, the history was on display in the people who worked & ate there, and I'd get a consistent, traditional (if unspectacular) sausage & cheese pie that again made me wonder why pizza isn't always at least this good, and wh so many people accept bad pizza so often. Norwalk's Letizia's in Norwalk and Carminuccio's in Newtown similarly saved me from crossing into New Haven County,though trying to get New Haven quality is what led me initially to cross the Housatonic and go to Roseland. My sister is in north Stratford and I look forward to following your recommendation.

As to Popeye's, that's too bad. Even with sometimes unkempt interiors, lax management, short-staffing, early shutdowns, raucous customers, items that have "run out for the night," and other legitimate complainables, I've become a huge fan of the soundtrack when inside, the food in or out, and the freewheeling anti-Chik-fil-A vibe. I suppose it's my Arby's.

Fwiw, every Popeye's receipt offers a 48-hour window for filling out a survey, getting a validation code to score a 2-piece if you buy a soft drink. I still haven't learned if they have unsweetened tea, so the beverage buy requirement holds me back. I can see how this wasn't good enough for your needs
 

RichZ

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Fwiw, every Popeye's receipt offers a 48-hour window for filling out a survey, getting a validation code to score a 2-piece if you buy a soft drink. I still haven't learned if they have unsweetened tea, so the beverage buy requirement holds me back. I can see how this wasn't good enough for your needs
To be honest, I tossed the receipt with the undercooked chicken. But their online form doesn't even ask for the receipt#, just what store and the time of day you were there.
 
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I read this and wondered how we haven't discussed it here before. Then I thought we had. So I searched and saw that @zyron , you and I discussed it a few times, starting more than three years ago. It was his sense then that Salerno's had slipped, but maybe he needed this ordering tip from you. I will keep it in mind next time I go visit my folks. Nice to see mention of both Salerno's and Scamorza. Warms my heart because it harkens back to the very start of my love affair with pizza.
Salerno's seasonal plum tomato pie is great; it's only served for a few weeks in the summer when the local tomatoes are at their best.
 
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They have issues... Pizza showdown: Here are your top 4. It’s time to vote for the No. 1 pizza place in Connecticut!

Alphabetical order:
Camille’s Wood-Fired Pizza - Tolland
Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana - New Haven
Tony’s Pizza - Willimantic
Pleasant Pizza - Willimantic
Hartford Courant: Pizza showdown: You voted. The No. 1 pizza place in Connecticut is...

No. 1: Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana

Readers had effusive praise for Pepe’s during the first voting round. Among the comments:
  • “Perfectly crisp wood fired thin crust dough, delicious toppings with the right amount of sauce”
  • “Best tasting sauce I have ever had, plus the pie itself is baked in coal fired ovens that make for the perfect crust”
  • “Traditional, legendary, taste is superior”
  • “Pepe’s has the greatest pizza - thin crust, nice char, amazing Romano cheese flavor in each bite.”
  • “Coal fired ovens, delicious thin crust, tasty sauce, BEST clam and bacon pizza”
No. 2: Pleasant Pizza
413 Pleasant St., Willimantic
Pleasant’s dedicated voters lauded the Willimantic pizza shop for its creative food, its excellent customer service and connection to the community. Among the reader comments:
  • “Because not only do they have the tastiest pizza around, they are also the most hospitable pizzeria. You can tell that they take pride in their work, you taste it in every slice.”
  • “They have a diverse selection of delicious pizzas and a beautiful garden outside to enjoy them, often with live music.”
  • “The best pizza I have ever tasted. Crust is never mushy when you get it home. They are constantly trying new pizza varieties. Maria’s Garden is such a special secret!”
  • “Top quality ingredients put together in creative ways. There’s something for everyone.”
  • “They offer exceptional service, appetizing food and an endless effort to give back to their Willimantic community.”
 

jrazz12

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Hartford Courant: Pizza showdown: You voted. The No. 1 pizza place in Connecticut is...

No. 1: Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana

Readers had effusive praise for Pepe’s during the first voting round. Among the comments:
  • “Perfectly crisp wood fired thin crust dough, delicious toppings with the right amount of sauce”
  • “Best tasting sauce I have ever had, plus the pie itself is baked in coal fired ovens that make for the perfect crust”
  • “Traditional, legendary, taste is superior”
  • “Pepe’s has the greatest pizza - thin crust, nice char, amazing Romano cheese flavor in each bite.”
  • “Coal fired ovens, delicious thin crust, tasty sauce, BEST clam and bacon pizza”
No. 2: Pleasant Pizza
413 Pleasant St., Willimantic
Pleasant’s dedicated voters lauded the Willimantic pizza shop for its creative food, its excellent customer service and connection to the community. Among the reader comments:
  • “Because not only do they have the tastiest pizza around, they are also the most hospitable pizzeria. You can tell that they take pride in their work, you taste it in every slice.”
  • “They have a diverse selection of delicious pizzas and a beautiful garden outside to enjoy them, often with live music.”
  • “The best pizza I have ever tasted. Crust is never mushy when you get it home. They are constantly trying new pizza varieties. Maria’s Garden is such a special secret!”
  • “Top quality ingredients put together in creative ways. There’s something for everyone.”
  • “They offer exceptional service, appetizing food and an endless effort to give back to their Willimantic community.”
#2? I'm sorry but this "pizza" looks like [expletive]
Untitled.png
 

ClifSpliffy

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When I lived in north Bridgeport before circling back to New Haven, Salerno's filled that 'local' slot I keep referring to. The dining room was fixed in the 70's, the history was on display in the people who worked & ate there, and I'd get a consistent, traditional (if unspectacular) sausage & cheese pie that again made me wonder why pizza isn't always at least this good, and wh so many people accept bad pizza so often. Norwalk's Letizia's in Norwalk and Carminuccio's in Newtown similarly saved me from crossing into New Haven County,though trying to get New Haven quality is what led me initially to cross the Housatonic and go to Roseland. My sister is in north Stratford and I look forward to following your recommendation.

As to Popeye's, that's too bad. Even with sometimes unkempt interiors, lax management, short-staffing, early shutdowns, raucous customers, items that have "run out for the night," and other legitimate complainables, I've become a huge fan of the soundtrack when inside, the food in or out, and the freewheeling anti-Chik-fil-A vibe. I suppose it's my Arby's.

Fwiw, every Popeye's receipt offers a 48-hour window for filling out a survey, getting a validation code to score a 2-piece if you buy a soft drink. I still haven't learned if they have unsweetened tea, so the beverage buy requirement holds me back. I can see how this wasn't good enough for your needs
'north bridgeport' and no props to Jennie's? (formerly of The Hollow, a few blocks from Jerry's Apizza) and who let you in anyhow, since I don't recall that plebiscite. recall! anyway, recently a relative showed me a copy of a pic on salerno's wall in which another relative is part of the original staff. I didn''t know that relative, and I've never had their za. now, I will, but not because of the photo. zagats can't touch the BY pizza review. maybe we won't pull your card if you stand in the middle of McLevy green, and shout 'scamozza!' three times. honest abe did it, and then won his Presidential campaign.
'In February 1860, Abraham Lincoln came east to speak at Cooper Union in New York City, where on February 27 he impressed eastern Republicans as an intelligent, dignified statesman and gained support in his bid for the presidential nomination. Since the speech went over well, he made several others (all similar to his Cooper Union speech) in Connecticut and Rhode Island, traveling by train to various cities. After stopping in Providence, Norwich, Hartford, Meriden and New Haven, he made his final speech in the evening of Saturday, March 10, in Bridgeport.[19]
His train was scheduled to stop at 10:27 a.m. in Bridgeport, and he likely met with Republican leaders. "He was entertained at the home of Mr. Frederick Wood at 67 Washington Avenue, and it is said that there he had his first experience with New England fried oysters," wrote Nelson R. Burr in Abraham Lincoln: Western Star Over Connecticut. "Another tradition is that while he stayed in Bridgeport a little girl, Mary A. Curtis of Stratford, presented him with a bouquet of flowers and a bunch of salt hay from the Stratford meadows. ... Where the flowers came from at that season, and how the hay could be cheerfully green, is not explained.'
nah, he came for the za. repent!
 
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8893

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'north bridgeport' and no props to Jennie's?
I couldn't make sense out of anything past this, but Jennie's deserves a like nonetheless.

So, my Bridgeport/Stratford brethren, I am now trying to remember the very first place I recall us regularly getting our "scamotz" pies as a kid, when we lived in Lordship, so probably talking around 1970 to 1973-ish. IIRC it was in Bridgeport, near the intersection of Stratford/Lordship/Bridgeport, and it was either next door or at least very close to our go-to fish & chips place (which for some reason I remember as "John's," or maybe that was the name of the pizza place?). I have a vague recollection of it being on or around Central Ave. Anyone have any memory of that?
 

storrsroars

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When I lived in north Bridgeport before circling back to New Haven, Salerno's filled that 'local' slot I keep referring to. The dining room was fixed in the 70's, the history was on display in the people who worked & ate there, and I'd get a consistent, traditional (if unspectacular) sausage & cheese pie that again made me wonder why pizza isn't always at least this good, and wh so many people accept bad pizza so often. Norwalk's Letizia's in Norwalk and Carminuccio's in Newtown similarly saved me from crossing into New Haven County,though trying to get New Haven quality is what led me initially to cross the Housatonic and go to Roseland. My sister is in north Stratford and I look forward to following your recommendation.
I lived about a 1/2 mile south of the Trumbull Mall for a couple years in late 80s. About the only decent thing I recall food-wise in N. Bridgeport was a deli on the corner of Madison & Eckhart that introduced me to salt sticks and became my regular breakfast hit on my daily commute to Norwalk (apparently the building is now a Goodfellas). I know I must've eaten pizza while I lived there, but nothing stood out, nor do I recall ever going out for pizza in Bridgeport while living there. I recall most of my pizza eating was after work in Norwalk or Westport, or bringing pizzas home from Norwalk or Westport.

Btw, that Willi pizza in the photo... that's what 90% of all pizza in Pittsburgh looks like.
 

ClifSpliffy

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Stratford? we lived/live on the west side, and only went to Stratford to go to the Bridgeport (sikorsky) airport, with an occasional stop at Town Fair (they invented tires) for rye bread. as to bread, 'salt sticks?' they're shosh kifli, daggnabbit! get it right, or we'll pull your card, too. croissants? hunkies were making 'crescent rolls' with salt, poppy, etc while the french were still living in trees. lol.
 

storrsroars

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Stratford? we lived/live on the west side, and only went to Stratford to go to the Bridgeport (sikorsky) airport, with an occasional stop at Town Fair (they invented tires) for rye bread. as to bread, 'salt sticks?' they're shosh kifli, daggnabbit! get it right, or we'll pull your card, too. croissants? hunkies were making 'crescent rolls' with salt, poppy, etc while the french were still living in trees. lol.
Not I. Was on Madison Ave near Sacred Heart in a POS condo complex I bought when I thought the market had already crashed as far as it was going to. Little did I know my guess was $70K short of actual bottom.

I was unfamiliar with "hunky" until I moved to Pittsburgh and married into upwardly mobile hunky stock. If you come from hunky stock, that explains a whole lot... stubborn, unreasonable creatures, they.
 

Hans Sprungfeld

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'north bridgeport' and no props to Jennie's? (formerly of The Hollow, a few blocks from Jerry's Apizza) and who let you in anyhow, since I don't recall that plebiscite. recall! anyway, recently a relative showed me a copy of a pic on salerno's wall in which another relative is part of the original staff. I didn''t know that relative, and I've never had their za. now, I will, but not because of the photo. zagats can't touch the BY pizza review. maybe we won't pull your card if you stand in the middle of McLevy green, and shout 'scamozza!' three times. honest abe did it, and then won his Presidential campaign.
'In February 1860, Abraham Lincoln came east to speak at Cooper Union in New York City, where on February 27 he impressed eastern Republicans as an intelligent, dignified statesman and gained support in his bid for the presidential nomination. Since the speech went over well, he made several others (all similar to his Cooper Union speech) in Connecticut and Rhode Island, traveling by train to various cities. After stopping in Providence, Norwich, Hartford, Meriden and New Haven, he made his final speech in the evening of Saturday, March 10, in Bridgeport.[19]
His train was scheduled to stop at 10:27 a.m. in Bridgeport, and he likely met with Republican leaders. "He was entertained at the home of Mr. Frederick Wood at 67 Washington Avenue, and it is said that there he had his first experience with New England fried oysters," wrote Nelson R. Burr in Abraham Lincoln: Western Star Over Connecticut. "Another tradition is that while he stayed in Bridgeport a little girl, Mary A. Curtis of Stratford, presented him with a bouquet of flowers and a bunch of salt hay from the Stratford meadows. ... Where the flowers came from at that season, and how the hay could be cheerfully green, is not explained.'
nah, he came for the za. repent!
Wasn't Jasper McLevy a (capital S!) Socialist?

Was Jenny' s (showing as Jenna's on Yelp) formerly Julian's? If so, I had high hopes because cause of the wood on ven, but preferred Salerno's, though I could get a decent slice there.

There was also a place on Capitol Ave near Brooklawn that held some promise it didn't quite live up to, and I admit to a fondness for sitting at the counter and watching conveyor belt pizzas emerge from (Arthur's) Famous down near UB, though that was mostly a long time ago, and I chickened out from going back and instead tried Brewport last July when I was nearby for CT Free Shakespeare.
 
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Hans Sprungfeld

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I lived about a 1/2 mile south of the Trumbull Mall for a couple years in late 80s. About the only decent thing I recall food-wise in N. Bridgeport was a deli on the corner of Madison & Eckhart that introduced me to salt sticks and became my regular breakfast hit on my daily commute to Norwalk (apparently the building is now a Goodfellas). I know I must've eaten pizza while I lived there, but nothing stood out, nor do I recall ever going out for pizza in Bridgeport while living there. I recall most of my pizza eating was after work in Norwalk or Westport, or bringing pizzas home from Norwalk or Westport.

Btw, that Willi pizza in the photo... that's what 90% of all pizza in Pittsburgh looks like.
I know where Goodfellas is, but lived east of Main Street, perched above Lake Forest.
 

RichZ

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I couldn't make sense out of anything past this, but Jennie's deserves a like nonetheless.

So, my Bridgeport/Stratford brethren, I am now trying to remember the very first place I recall us regularly getting our "scamotz" pies as a kid, when we lived in Lordship, so probably talking around 1970 to 1973-ish. IIRC it was in Bridgeport, near the intersection of Stratford/Lordship/Bridgeport, and it was either next door or at least very close to our go-to fish & chips place (which for some reason I remember as "John's," or maybe that was the name of the pizza place?). I have a vague recollection of it being on or around Central Ave. Anyone have any memory of that?
C&C
Was on the corner of Connecticut and Caroll Avenues. Owned and operated by the same family that owned Salerno's on Park Ave, but the pizza was a little different (more tang to the sauce and a thinner crust).You can order a pie thin crust "C&C style" at Salerno's in Stratford today and it's very, very close.
 

RichZ

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Wasn't Jasper McLevy a (capital S!) Socialist?
McLevy was a "socialist" (actually, he was eventually drummed out of the National Socialist Party and was among the founders of the "Socialist Democratic Federation") but was among the least progressive politicians in CT history.
He is often quoted in reference to snow removal, as having said "The Lord put it there, and the Lord will take it away," but the phrase, or words to that effect actually came from the lips of an inebriated Director of Public Works in a bar room conversation. McLevy didn't express disagreement though.
He balanced the city's budget and lowered taxes by eliminating or reducing services and put public employees on a merit system. Pretty much the opposite of what we think of as a socialist approach.
 
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