OT: Stuff you didn’t know you needed

Chin Diesel

Power of Love
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If you own anything stainless steel, this is a game changer.

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I got a massage gun for xmas (went with the knockoff brand - Taotronic ~$130) and it's amazing. I hit my calves, achilles and hamstrings every night for 5-10 min and I'm actually able to run again...had pretty much given up on it due to recurring injuries

It's easy to use, and quite enough that I can watch tv while using it
Ordered. I've been having non stop running injuries. Thanks
 

HuskyHawk

Hoping to see something that looks like basketball
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Ordered. I've been having non stop running injuries. Thanks

That’s what that Tigers Tail I posted at the start is all about. You don’t need an electric gizmo.
 
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Instant Pot - Game changer for me.

Window washing kit - blades, telescopic pole, soap brush. Killer windows on the step ladder in under and hour. No more fear of falling 20 floors to see clearly outside.
 

dvegas

Duck Fuke
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I am going to the hardware store tomorrow to get some lumber to make an other shelf for my work desk at home. Went through my spare lumber and stuff and garage and shed and didn't have what I needed. I'm thinking some 4"x"4 blocks and a 1"x10" plank is enough to raise computer to slightly above eye level.

An a!tentative to a standing desk is a kneeling chair. There are times I have back spasms so severe I can barely manage to sit on the toilet (even worse getting off), but can do a little work at my desk on the kneeling chair. Had a $300 model for years, when it eventually wore out a $60 replacement from Staples works just fine. Takes a little time to get it adjusted correctly, but once its set, you ate goid to go.
 

CL82

UConn Basketball: A Caldron of Intensity
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An a!tentative to a standing desk is a kneeling chair. There are times I have back spasms so severe I can barely manage to sit on the toilet (even worse getting off), but can do a little work at my desk on the kneeling chair. Had a $300 model for years, when it eventually wore out a $60 replacement from Staples works just fine. Takes a little time to get it adjusted correctly, but once its set, you ate goid to go.
Preheat your bed before getting in it.
 
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I am not the chef in the house but I spoke to her about her cast iron skillets.. She has 5 or 6.. ..2 of which are going on 75 years of age ( her Grandmother's favorites).. And continues to use on a weekly basis..

Her advice.. After usuage and after cleaning/drying..Use vegetable oil to season vs olive oil ..Olive oil has a high flash point and when used on subsequent meals could affect the quality of your results.. Since skillets tend to need a fair amount of heat.. Part of the calculus.

She never cleans the skillets with soap after a meal.. ..Always with hot water and a good scrubbing..

Some purists will lightly heat the skillet on the stove top.(to dry it) vs drying with a towel to retain quality..
Not to be a total pedant, but I think you mean olive oil has a low smoke point. Honestly, the two biggest issues I see with family/friends that consider themselves bad cooks is defaulting to olive oil/cooking spray for EVERYTHINg and not using enough salt. Figure out those two areas and your meals become much better.

The heating to dry thing is less a purist or quality thing and more to make sure that it's actually dry. If you're drying with a towel, you'll probably (aside from ruining your towel) leave some moisture on that will rust over time. Inherited a few nicer old cast iron pans from my wife's grandmother and ended up having to grind them down to bare metal and reseason to get rid of caked on rust from her not drying them over the years.
 
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You found a 20 story telescoping pole, and still need a step ladder ?
Not quite. I was using an old rickety bar stool to kneel or stand on to get to the top of my windows. I kive on the 20th floor of my building and the railing is a couple feet behind me. Not good.

New situation is a small kitchen step ladder, window wiper and soaper which have a 6' pole attachement to reach up. No more wobbling around. The new tools are a gamechanger and the outside windows are done well in a flash.
 
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Her answer not mine.. Because iron skillets are made of somewhat porous metal.. The oil you use to season the skillet might occasionally "bleed" through the next time you use it for cooking... So.. If you're generally okay with the potential for a "hint" of coconut.. No problem.. Her opinion is that the flash point for residual coconut oil (through the seasoning process) should not be a problem on your next meal..

FWIW..We're big fans of coconut oil for other stuff.. Enjoy your skillet..They're a lot of fun as discussed today..

Seasoning tip #1, #2, #3 and #4: Use WAY LESS oil that you think you need to. A barely visible sheen is all you need. I use less than a teaspoon and wipe it off with a towel pretty vigorously when I'm done. And this is true for seasoning bare metal, not just a pre-seasoned lodge or after cooking a meal.

If you're seasoning properly there will be 0 hint of any oil taste. It is all carbon by the time you're done.
 
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Using soap on a cast iron skillet will get you written out of wills.

Never needs anything more than a clean water wash and scub and, as others have mentioned, canola/corn/vegetable oil.

FWIW modern soap doesn't have any impact on cast iron because they don't use lye. A little soap, a chain mail scrubber, and elbow grease are the best way to go. As long as you put it back on the stove to dry it off to avoid rust, it's fine.

I have cooked on cast iron or used my dutch oven for the past 4 or 5 years exclusively at home. That only changed this past Christmas--fiance bought me a carbon steel pan. You season it a lot like a cast iron. I thought she was nuts because it's just like a cast iron... but I think the shape of the pan is a lot better than my cast irons (really old classic Wagner one's) for anything with sauces. Browning meats it's about the same, but I still use my cast iron when I can because I know it so well.

The only downside is that the seasoning is a little more finnicky. It took me a couple tries to get it to really stick and I think it's prone to peeling off if you're not careful. Cast irons are really bullet proof... literally, lol... once you have a base of seasoning there's practically nothing you can do to mess them up.


It's one of these bad boys--I believe the 11 inch version.
 
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Not to be a total pedant, but I think you mean olive oil has a low smoke point. Honestly, the two biggest issues I see with family/friends that consider themselves bad cooks is defaulting to olive oil/cooking spray for EVERYTHINg and not using enough salt. Figure out those two areas and your meals become much better.

The heating to dry thing is less a purist or quality thing and more to make sure that it's actually dry. If you're drying with a towel, you'll probably (aside from ruining your towel) leave some moisture on that will rust over time. Inherited a few nicer old cast iron pans from my wife's grandmother and ended up having to grind them down to bare metal and reseason to get rid Dof caked on rust from her not drying them over the years.
Dove.. Pre-qualifying statement.. I am not the chef .. It is her opinion that olive oil generally has a higher flash point when compared to other oil choices.. Her choice of oil to use in the skillet is a function of the recipe and not simply deferring to the same oil to use every time. Not going to die on this hill.. I am not qualified to take a definitive position.. No where near as experienced as you and others.. Just relaying her thoughts..

My larger point was that cast iron skillets can be awesome long term cooking utensils if well cared for.. Agree with your comments/experiences stated above through my own observations/questions of her methods..

BTW..The older skillets she uses (her Grandmothers) ..Are about 75+yrs old.. Were used daily back then and she was told how to care for them Have held up really nicely. .. She's from Iowa farm country.. Was the go-to- skillet "back in the day."
 
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FWIW modern soap doesn't have any impact on cast iron because they don't use lye. A little soap, a chain mail scrubber, and elbow grease are the best way to go. As long as you put it back on the stove to dry it off to avoid rust, it's fine.

I have cooked on cast iron or used my dutch oven for the past 4 or 5 years exclusively at home. That only changed this past Christmas--fiance bought me a carbon steel pan. You season it a lot like a cast iron. I thought she was nuts because it's just like a cast iron... but I think the shape of the pan is a lot better than my cast irons (really old classic Wagner one's) for anything with sauces. Browning meats it's about the same, but I still use my cast iron when I can because I know it so well.

The only downside is that the seasoning is a little more finnicky. It took me a couple tries to get it to really stick and I think it's prone to peeling off if you're not careful. Cast irons are really bullet proof... literally, lol... once you have a base of seasoning there's practically nothing you can do to mess them up.


It's one of these bad boys--I believe the 11 inch version.
Nice set up.. Our non-skillet choices are All Clads.. Eye Ball test.. Looks similar to your new set up.. All Good.. Enjoy the ride..
 
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I picked up a cast-iron pan off Craigslist, had our neighbor who sharpens knives as side business get it completely sanded to smooth metal, then I re-seasoned it but used Avocado oil (high smoke point). On the bottom of my pan it says "Wapak #9". The pan has a very smooth surface (not pebbly), taller more vertical sides that are thinner too, so pan weighs a little less than you'd expect, but it still is solid. Haven't really cooked with it yet due to still in midst of remodeling, but I'm looking forward to using it.

One things I will desperately need is a good cooking thermometer so I don't overcook things. What is a decent one to get?
 
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Dove.. Pre-qualifying statement.. I am not the chef .. It is her opinion that olive oil generally has a higher flash point when compared to other oil choices.. Her choice of oil to use in the skillet is a function of the recipe and not simply deferring to the same oil to use every time. Not going to die on this hill.. I am not qualified to take a definitive position.. No where near as experienced as you and others.. Just relaying her thoughts..

My larger point was that cast iron skillets can be awesome long term cooking utensils if well cared for.. Agree with your comments/experiences stated above through my own observations/questions of her methods..

BTW..The older skillets she uses (her Grandmothers) ..Are about 75+yrs old.. Were used daily back then and she was told how to care for them Have held up really nicely. .. She's from Iowa farm country.. Was the go-to- skillet "back in the day."
Not making a judgement on Mrs. Chief's cooking, just sharing my thoughts. Outside of the olive oil having a low smoke point being the reason to not use as seasoning, the rest is just general thoughts on the subject. I'm sure she makes a mean meal in those skillets.
 
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Not making a judgement on Mrs. Chief's cooking, just sharing my thoughts. Outside of the olive oil having a low smoke point being the reason to not use as seasoning, the rest is just general thoughts on the subject. I'm sure she makes a mean meal in those skillets.
To be clear.. We rarely do any frying in the skillets .. Used for other recipes.. Esp meats.. My lane is more as a Sous Chef/DJ/Bartender/Sommelier/Dog walker.. But I digress.

Glad to see you and my man Get A Job are still vibing.. I was a little worried about you guys..BTW..I won't tell the wife you called her that..She's not a big fan..

Have a great day. .Looking forward to toasting to Corey's birthday and good news tonight.
 
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I picked up a cast-iron pan off Craigslist, had our neighbor who sharpens knives as side business get it completely sanded to smooth metal, then I re-seasoned it but used Avocado oil (high smoke point). On the bottom of my pan it says "Wapak #9". The pan has a very smooth surface (not pebbly), taller more vertical sides that are thinner too, so pan weighs a little less than you'd expect, but it still is solid. Haven't really cooked with it yet due to still in midst of remodeling, but I'm looking forward to using it.

One things I will desperately need is a good cooking thermometer so I don't overcook things. What is a decent one to get?

The smooth cast irons are generally older--they were made before they used sand molds like on the new lodges. I much prefer those to the newer ones. Eggs slide around easier and they're usually lighter.

Does yours have the cool old Wapak Indian head on the bottom?
 

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