OT Running

Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
3,515
Likes
3,892
61 and I am still playing hoops twice a week (until COVID suspended that) and running/jogging 2-3x week. A couple of years ago I got into biking and that has really helped. Honestly may not go back to the basketball post COVID because my body feels better from less pounding on the floor. Xcountry skiing in the winter is also a lot easier on the body.
 
Joined
Sep 18, 2011
Messages
90
Likes
149
I love the Couch to 5K plan.

5 surgeries on my left knee (PCL reconstruction & 4 meniscus repairs/removals) & still hanging in there at 48.

I try to walk at least a mile on my non-C25K days. Filling the exercise rings on my Apple Watch is a great motivator.
 

back2BE4us

The Carpenter will carpent.
Joined
Oct 10, 2019
Messages
54
Likes
106
38 yo, about 180lbs, run about 350 miles a year.

FWIW about 5 years ago I switched from running in common neutral shoes (Brooks Ghost, Adidas Boost) to full-on Hoka One One Bondi series. They are full-stack, maximum cushioning shoes that are surprisingly lightweight. The massive benefit is that since they are so cushioned it creates less impact on joints and recovery time is much faster.

I will never go back to typical cushioned shoes again unless I do trail work. Anyone who has not tried them absolutely has to. It's not a gimmick, it's a very real and beneficial technology that other companies are finally starting to copy. The minimalist, 0mm heel-toe drop, "natural" shoe was a ridiculous experiment, especially for most heavier or older runners. Probably caused more injuries than helped.

The newest version is the Bondi 7. I love the Bondi 6 and have bought about 4 pairs off of eBay for roughly $70 apiece ($150 in stores). Also comes in wide sizes.

Hope that helps anyone!
 
Joined
Apr 16, 2020
Messages
601
Likes
401
I restarted a very meager running program
53 years old
I’ve been doing walking only for 18 months since I found out I had a condition.
But my doctor is allowing me to go full boat to what I can handle
My workout
2 minutes 4 mph
2 minutes 7.5 mph
Then repeat back to 4-7.5
I do this for 18 minutes
Drop back to 3.5 mph for 30 sec
Then run the last 90 sec at 10 mph comes out to close to even walk / run
I’m completely shot at this point
My goal over the next year is to move for more time at the 7.5 intervals less at the brisk walk and I’m hoping to be able to do 3 minutes by next year to end it. I like the 20 min for me. Not interested in further
Any thoughts or advice on this? Thanks
Why don't you buy a Sports watch so you can monitor your heart rate? I have a Myzone which comes with a belt and clip. You wet the electrode on the strap, fasten the clip, and enter the Myzone app which you download from Google Playstore, and enter basic data, like your date of birth, and the app will know your maximum heart rate.

I am 73 so my max heart rate is 220-73, or 147. I can see the % of heart rate on the watch and on my tablet or android phone, where the apps are downloaded. I feel pretty good at 70-75% of heart rate or 103 bpm to 111. If I want to push myself, I do intervals where I get the bpm to 80% or 120 bpm. I do not run. It puts a lot of stress on the joints.

If you had a stress test, the doctor should have told you the safest heart rate % for you. I don't mean the maximum heart rate for you age, but the percent of maximum or beats per minute that you can handle.

You can read the data on HIIT is you like, subject to conferring with your doctor. HIIT or Tabata means you exercise as hard as you can at intervals so you can accomplish the equivalent of a 30 minute workout in 8 minutes. Again, if you had a condition, you need to ask your doctor what is appropriate.

HIIT can mean 30 seconds as fast as you can pedal (if on an exercise bike or on an arc trainer/elliptical). Then a moderate rate for 2 minutes, and back to the 30 seconds. Or, some HIIT means 30 seconds as fast as you can go and 30 seconds at a moderate clip, and this is all done in about 8 minutes.

I like wearing the watch and looking at it and at the app. Myzone gives you the cumulative calories during a period of exercise via the heart icon.

Just my take. I am not looking to kill myself over it. If I can get 500 to 600 calories in an hour session, I feel I have accomplished something.

The other take is, nothing wrong in 2 thirty minute sessions, twice a day, or 3 twenty minute sessions. And, you don't even need an hour a day. Two sessions of 20 minutes each is fine.

Using the mph sounds like you are running, since 3 mph is considered more than just a leisurely walk. Measuring the bpm IMO is a more sound and careful way to measure progress, especially if you are on the mend for a condition.

If you always were an athlete, I can understand why you want to get back to what was a fairly rigorous regimen.

Wish you well on your exercise regimen.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2013
Messages
1,158
Likes
2,221
57 years old. Im 6’3”. Former offensive lineman whose weight topped out at 250 during playing days. Stayed active after that (occasional running, Nordic Trac, skiing, pick up hoop, etc). Weight has fluctuated the past 25 years between 225-235. Started running 5Ks in my early 40s. ACL reconstruction/meniscus tears/arthritis has caught up with my knees this past year. Fixed up my road bike once covid hit and started doing weekly 20-25 milers with a group. Love it. Family got an Eschelon bike too. No more high impact stuff for me any more.

Moral of the story: Muscles may stay stronger longer if you exercise but connective tissue still ages at the same rate. Getting/staying active is better than being a slug, but but listen to your body.
 
Joined
Apr 16, 2020
Messages
601
Likes
401
God bless. I'm 50 and was just telling my nephew that the next time I run there will be a bear very close behind. I honestly can't remember the last time I ran or even walked briskly. I used to enjoy it and then one day I didn't.
One way to get into brisk walking is something I do myself.

Either in your backyard, or at a field in a nearby park, take a kickball and kick the ball maybe 4-8 feet in front of you and this forces you to brisk walk or mildly jog to catch up with the ball, I alternate the feet so I may kick in with the right foot and when I catch up with it, then with the left foot. Actually, I don't always kick it straight ahead, but sometimes to the left rf right. This forces my body to change direction.

I went to the football field at the nearby high school and went up and down the field and had a great time.

You get the heart rate up. Wear an over the ear headset and listen to the music of your choice. This pushes you along. You are not running, but are walking or maybe mildly jogging.

Simple, but effective.
 
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
3,515
Likes
3,892
I read a great book years ago titled Younger Next Year. I'm not one for self-help books, but this one was really good. It addresses health as you age and one of the great points of the book is that what constitutes an active life style is often very different from one person to another. The most important thing is to move and be active and engaged at a level that makes sense for the individual. Highly recommend it.
 

QDOG5

Got a couple of couches sleep on the love seat
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
1,155
Likes
2,212
I've been an active runner for 30 years. I'm 58 now and 2020 was the least I've run in the last 30. I'm hoping to turn it around in '21. I was never a fast runner, 7:45 per mile bitd, 10:00 now. I've never run a marathon but I have run 15 halfs, a lot of 10 milers and 10ks. The most interesting race I participated in was the Pikes Peak ascent which is a half marathon starting in the town of Manitou Springs and ending atop Pikes Peak. Only the true athletes run it. The majority of participants(me) run the first mile followed by a 12 mile climb. The crazy thing is the next day is a marathon up and down the mountain and about 20% of the participants do the double. I don't have a large to do list - I would like to finish a marathon, maybe run/walk it. Also, I'd like to run a Litchfield Hills Road Race because I'm from the area and have never run it. Anyone care to share some running stories?
 
Last edited:

Chin Diesel

Power of Love
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
24,141
Likes
34,257
Just took a nice mid day break from staring at my computer inside my house. Had a major push for a Windows 10 update on my work computer. Said it would take 2-3 hours and, well midday seemed like a way better choice than watching it download tonight.

Went out to the garage and knocked out 60 minutes on the treadmill. My post on the first page of this thread said I'm still doing 8 minute walk with 2 minute runs. Got below 17 minute mile which is closer to where I want to be for cardio purposes. Upped the speed for the walk pace and the run pace. Next week I'll go 7/3 walk/run and get it below 16 minute miles with a goal towards 15 minute mile combined walk/run. As I said, I'm doing this more for blood pressure and heart rate than I am speed or fat burn. 15 minute pace for an hour is 4 miles; add in a 1/4 mile cool down and I'm good with those numbers.

Also worked arms with bicep and tricep dumbbells when I got done with treadmill. And...... I still have 75 minutes left on download.
 

Fishy

Puncher of Throats
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
15,781
Likes
53,004
I've been an active runner for 30 years. I'm 58 now and 2020 was the least I've run in the last 30. I'm hoping to turn it around in '21. I was never a fast runner, 7:45 per mile bitd, 10:00 now. I've never run a marathon but I have run 15 halfs, a lot of 10 milers and 10ks. The most interesting race I participated in was the Pikes Peak ascent which is a half marathon starting in the town of Manitou Springs and ending atop Pikes Peak. Only the true athletes run it. The majority of participants(me) run the first mile followed by a 12 mile climb. The crazy thing is the next day is a marathon up and down the mountain and about 20% of the participants do the double. I don't have a large to do list - I would like to finish a marathon, maybe run/walk it. Also, I'd like to run a Litchfield Hills Road Race because I'm from the area and have never run it. Anyone care to share some running stories?

The Litchfield race is very nice - very pretty. It’s not the toughest course, but there is a laugh-out-loud hill right after mile six on Gallows Lane.

Hardest race I have ever done is the Escarpment Trail Run - it’s a 30K trail race over the five high peaks in the Catskills. The uphills are tough, but you really feel the downhills in your legs for about a week afterwards. One of the landmarks near the end of the race is a plane that crashed into the side of the mountain....you know you’ve been through something when you’re happy to see a plane crash.
 
Joined
Aug 28, 2011
Messages
1,904
Likes
3,572
Just be careful with running. In the next decade or so I think more people will realize that running is murder on the body. It's probably the worst form of exercise: the least efficient and does the most damage. Even if you don't feel it immediately, you will someday, especially if you're a street/pavement runner. The wear and tear will catch up to you. Repetitive impact movements done a million times over: it's easy to see why it's bad for your knees, your ankles, your back, etc. Not to mention many people have poor running gaits. At least try trail running or go to your local HS track if you want to run.

I was always an athlete, played college hoops and did cross-country and track through HS. I loved running and stuck with it through my 30s (shorter distances, usually under five miles per run) but I decided to stop about two years ago and, man, my body feels a million times better. I wasn't doing anything crazy, about 12 miles a week (3x4), but even that was enough to give me aches and pains all over. Even with proper shoes, proper form, proper stretching pre/post workout my body has simply had enough. I now do spin/biking workouts (HIIT is amazing) and go for 3-4 mile walks with the wife on off days.

I'm friends with a woman who was a college athlete and got huge into running in her late 20s. She has a solid social media following, travels all over the country, does marathons, coaching, training--all that. This poor woman is constantly discovering new obscure injuries that she has to go through. At least once a year she tells me about some bizarre new injury or problem I had never heard of before. She was a pillar of health before she took up running. It's an unforgiving hobby, which sucks because it's quite enjoyable.
 

QDOG5

Got a couple of couches sleep on the love seat
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
1,155
Likes
2,212
@Lefty2one, I understand and agree with you. I got into running because my wife started training for a marathon and our conversations became mostly running oriented :) so I decided to start running also. My wife ran Chicago twice and NYC once along with many halfs also. She has had neuromas removed from both feet and although she has no foot problems now she is finished with running. She is a Peloton devotee. I have tight hips from running but it it my favorite exercise and I intend to continue running. Stretching and advil are my go tos now. I realize it is not the most prudent exercise at my age but at 10 minute pace it's almost a speed up walk. Also, my post was more about runs folks have done or are planning on doing rather than an endorsement of running. The HS in my hometown has 27 state boys XC titles and the girls won their first this year. Running is big around here.
 
Last edited:

huskeynut

Leader of the Band
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Messages
5,384
Likes
7,613
First, great you are getting out and exercising.

I'm 69 and I bike 7 to 8 miles every day. My speed is between 10.5 and 11.5 mph. I'm on flat roads. Since I started up riding again, I have lost 18 pounds and improved my BP and cardio.

I use to run. But 2 surgeries on each knee, one the old fashion way, and a bad back from a car accident took its toll. If I walk I can make about 2 miles before I have to stop because of the back.

I definitely recommend using some form of fitness app. I have one on my iWatch that is sinked to my iPhone. Its great for keeping track of all my rides.
 
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
3,515
Likes
3,892
I totally get the concerns around the pounding from running and I've been playing hoops for years 2-3 times a week. At 61 I realized I needed to find other forms of cardio activity. I didn't cut out the running and hoops, but I've curtailed them and I have to say I feel a lot better. The bike was a huge find for me, as was xcountry skiing. I get on the rower a bit in the winter as well, but don't enjoy that as much.

I also stopped lifting weights as I was constantly hurting myself (shoulders mostly) and I've gone to resistance stuff, mostly push-ups. I feel a lot better from that as well.

I think especially as you get older you have to be realistic about what your body can withstand in terms of impact. But you have to keep moving and find the right stuff.
 

CL82

UConn Basketball: A Caldron of Intensity
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
39,910
Likes
68,371
I restarted a very meager running program
53 years old
I’ve been doing walking only for 18 months since I found out I had a condition.
But my doctor is allowing me to go full boat to what I can handle
My workout
2 minutes 4 mph
2 minutes 7.5 mph
Then repeat back to 4-7.5
I do this for 18 minutes
Drop back to 3.5 mph for 30 sec
Then run the last 90 sec at 10 mph comes out to close to even walk / run
I’m completely shot at this point
My goal over the next year is to move for more time at the 7.5 intervals less at the brisk walk and I’m hoping to be able to do 3 minutes by next year to end it. I like the 20 min for me. Not interested in further
Any thoughts or advice on this? Thanks
Couch to 5K Free download

Easy interval training with music and instruction. Down load it to your phone and you're good to go. At the end of 9 weeks you should be able to run 3.1 miles in 9 weeks.
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
2,352
Likes
2,830
WIW about 5 years ago I switched from running in common neutral shoes (Brooks Ghost, Adidas Boost) to full-on Hoka One One Bondi series. They are full-stack, maximum cushioning shoes that are surprisingly lightweight. The massive benefit is that since they are so cushioned it creates less impact on joints and recovery time is much faster

Seconding this. I'm 34 with a torn hip labrum and the hokas let me get a couple pain free miles in a few times per week.

Also important is strengthening all the little muscles around your joints. Get a bosu ball and do some balance work while watching TV
 
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
4,621
Likes
6,590
I've been an active runner for 30 years. I'm 58 now and 2020 was the least I've run in the last 30. I'm hoping to turn it around in '21. I was never a fast runner, 7:45 per mile bitd, 10:00 now. I've never run a marathon but I have run 15 halfs, a lot of 10 milers and 10ks. The most interesting race I participated in was the Pikes Peak ascent which is a half marathon starting in the town of Manitou Springs and ending atop Pikes Peak. Only the true athletes run it. The majority of participants(me) run the first mile followed by a 12 mile climb. The crazy thing is the next day is a marathon up and down the mountain and about 20% of the participants do the double. I don't have a large to do list - I would like to finish a marathon, maybe run/walk it. Also, I'd like to run a Litchfield Hills Road Race because I'm from the area and have never run it. Anyone care to share some running stories?

I have a bunch of family in CO Springs. So I've been to Manitou and know what you're talking about. Looks insane. Had done "the incline" a while back but heard they basically had to shut it down because its become so popular with people.
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2016
Messages
400
Likes
602
Just be careful with running. In the next decade or so I think more people will realize that running is murder on the body. It's probably the worst form of exercise: the least efficient and does the most damage. Even if you don't feel it immediately, you will someday, especially if you're a street/pavement runner. The wear and tear will catch up to you. Repetitive impact movements done a million times over: it's easy to see why it's bad for your knees, your ankles, your back, etc. Not to mention many people have poor running gaits. At least try trail running or go to your local HS track if you want to run.

I was always an athlete, played college hoops and did cross-country and track through HS. I loved running and stuck with it through my 30s (shorter distances, usually under five miles per run) but I decided to stop about two years ago and, man, my body feels a million times better. I wasn't doing anything crazy, about 12 miles a week (3x4), but even that was enough to give me aches and pains all over. Even with proper shoes, proper form, proper stretching pre/post workout my body has simply had enough. I now do spin/biking workouts (HIIT is amazing) and go for 3-4 mile walks with the wife on off days.

I'm friends with a woman who was a college athlete and got huge into running in her late 20s. She has a solid social media following, travels all over the country, does marathons, coaching, training--all that. This poor woman is constantly discovering new obscure injuries that she has to go through. At least once a year she tells me about some bizarre new injury or problem I had never heard of before. She was a pillar of health before she took up running. It's an unforgiving hobby, which sucks because it's quite enjoyable.

I do not totally agree with this. Yes, runners do get hurt as do other athletes, but running is certainly not the worst form of exercise. It is like any other sport, if you just go out and start running without an understanding of what you are doing, of course you can increase your chances to get hurt.

As I mentioned in my earlier post, for those of you starting out, getting back into it, or even experienced runners, try your best to focus on effort and not speed. Your Apple watch as well as most GPS watches track your heart rate and you want to do the majority of your running at about 60%-75% of your max heart rate. Even without a heart rate monitor, you can do this by running or run/walk at a pace where you can easily carry on a conversation with a running partner. After you establish a base you can start to include speed intervals, hill climbs, tempo runs, fartlek runs, etc into your training but the bulk (~ 80%-85%) of your running should be at that slow aerobic pace.

This will vastly limit the amount of impact on your body. You will actually get faster over time as you strengthen your cardio and you will enjoy running much more. I admit, it is hard at first to slow down when you know you can go faster but you adjust and it becomes much easier over time.

I am 52 and have been running regularly since my 20’s without a single injury and I can tell you I have been injured much worse doing other sports like playing hoops or weightlifting. In this crazy pandemic year of canceled races, I set new PR’s in marathon, half marathon, 10K and 5K - which I am calling the PR Grand Slam. (ETA: These were all live races either pre pandemic or post with approved Covid restrictions. Not virtual races). The 5K record was a race I never thought I would break since I set the original (19:33) back in 2003 when I was 35, But this last October I ran it in 19:11 (6:11/mile). Getting old does not necessarily mean getting slow!!
Anyone care to share some running stories?
As for fun running stories, last January (2020) I completed the Dopey Challenge at Walt Disney World. For those of you not familiar, the challenge is running back to back a 5K (Thursday), 10K (Friday), half marathon (Saturday) and full marathon (Sunday). 2020’s version had the added bonus of 80°+ temp on Sunday for the marathon. 48.6 miles in total over 4 days. It was very difficult but was tons of fun!! I was registered to do it again this year but it was canceled. ☹
 
Last edited:

Chin Diesel

Power of Love
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
24,141
Likes
34,257
Anyone care to share some running stories?

About 15-20 years ago I was in the US Navy stationed in Virginia Beach, Va. They had a cool 1/2 marathon called the Rock and Roll half marathon. Every mile marker had a stage and a band playing live music to help pass the time.
Anywho, I'm somewhere overseas when Mrs. Diesel emailed me about the event. She suggested we do it together. I was in decent shape and doing the math I figured I coudl easily knock out 9 minute miles and told her to put me down for 120 minutes (2 hours).
So, I'm on an aircraft carrier where they usually allow running on the flight deck in the morning before everything gets moving for the day and my training is going well. Periodically Mrs. Diesel tells me how well she is doing with her training back in the states.
I get home and we are a week or two before the event when Mrs. Diesel tweaks her knee and declares herself out of the race. No worries. I was able to convince a couple of other guys I work with to do the race, so I knew I'd have some company.
Night before race is registration. It's a decent size race with I think about 10k-15k runners at that point in its history. I go to get my packet and notice unlike 95% of the runner who had a white racing bib, I had a red bib. I asked the person why I had the red bib. The person explained since I was an elite runner, I'd be in the lead group running the race. I asked how in the hell was I elite and the person mentioned I had a time of 1 hour and 20 minutes. Turns out Mrs. Diesel took my 120 minute time and wrote it as 1 hour 20 minutes. I asked for a regular bib and was told forget about it, just go back in to which ever group behind me I wanted to run. They were releasing groups every minute by time slot.
So it's race day, Mrs. Diesel drops me off near the start line and tells me she is going to the finish line with our two kids both age 3 and younger. Me and my red bib are walking around and everyone wants to know why I have a different color bib. Got a bit tiring explaining the screw up.
So, the main group goes off and it's a while before me and the group I was in start running. So, early 2000's and still a lot of crappy flip phones out there, so i bought a disposable camera and some of those squeeze goo things and threw it all in a fanny pack. I wanted to get pics of the race and the bands while I was running. We are about mile marker 4 or 5 when my phone rings from Mrs. Diesel. Being the concerned loving husband and father I slow down to pick up the phone.
Mrs. DIesel: Where are you? There's a bunch of people already crossing the finish line and I haven't seen you yet.
Me: Still running. Got a little more than an hour to go.
Mrs. Diesel: Why aren't you finished?
Me: Well, by the time I got in the group with the pace I was going to run, we were about 25 minutes behind the lead group.
Mrs. Diesel: I'm bored. The kids are tired. We're leaving. Can you get a ride home?

We haven't signed up for another race together since then.
 
Joined
Mar 4, 2014
Messages
12,384
Likes
7,936
Just be careful with running. In the next decade or so I think more people will realize that running is murder on the body. It's probably the worst form of exercise: the least efficient and does the most damage. Even if you don't feel it immediately, you will someday, especially if you're a street/pavement runner. The wear and tear will catch up to you. Repetitive impact movements done a million times over: it's easy to see why it's bad for your knees, your ankles, your back, etc. Not to mention many people have poor running gaits. At least try trail running or go to your local HS track if you want to run.

I was always an athlete, played college hoops and did cross-country and track through HS. I loved running and stuck with it through my 30s (shorter distances, usually under five miles per run) but I decided to stop about two years ago and, man, my body feels a million times better. I wasn't doing anything crazy, about 12 miles a week (3x4), but even that was enough to give me aches and pains all over. Even with proper shoes, proper form, proper stretching pre/post workout my body has simply had enough. I now do spin/biking workouts (HIIT is amazing) and go for 3-4 mile walks with the wife on off days.

I'm friends with a woman who was a college athlete and got huge into running in her late 20s. She has a solid social media following, travels all over the country, does marathons, coaching, training--all that. This poor woman is constantly discovering new obscure injuries that she has to go through. At least once a year she tells me about some bizarre new injury or problem I had never heard of before. She was a pillar of health before she took up running. It's an unforgiving hobby, which sucks because it's quite enjoyable.
I get that it can be painful for some people but everything in moderation. I agree with mixing it up with trail running, HS track, I even jogged on grass fields when I had some pain in my knee. Just gotta know when to dial it back. I am not sure what you mean by "least efficient." Running is one of the most efficient forms of exercise in terms of burning calories and it's the easiest to do if you don't have a lot of time. Put on your kicks and you are good to go. I used to enjoy spin classes but I haven't belonged to a gym in 15 years. Cycling is great in the summer when it's hot and the days are long.
 

Chin Diesel

Power of Love
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
24,141
Likes
34,257
38 yo, about 180lbs, run about 350 miles a year.

FWIW about 5 years ago I switched from running in common neutral shoes (Brooks Ghost, Adidas Boost) to full-on Hoka One One Bondi series. They are full-stack, maximum cushioning shoes that are surprisingly lightweight. The massive benefit is that since they are so cushioned it creates less impact on joints and recovery time is much faster.

I will never go back to typical cushioned shoes again unless I do trail work. Anyone who has not tried them absolutely has to. It's not a gimmick, it's a very real and beneficial technology that other companies are finally starting to copy. The minimalist, 0mm heel-toe drop, "natural" shoe was a ridiculous experiment, especially for most heavier or older runners. Probably caused more injuries than helped.

The newest version is the Bondi 7. I love the Bondi 6 and have bought about 4 pairs off of eBay for roughly $70 apiece ($150 in stores). Also comes in wide sizes.

Hope that helps anyone!

Mrs. Diesel went to our local running shoe store and got the Hoka Clifton series.

Sales rep described the Clifton's as a Smore's where the marshmallow hasn't been melted and there is still some feedback where as the Bondi's are a melted marshmallow. Seems to match up to your description of maximum cushioning.
 
Joined
Feb 24, 2014
Messages
170
Likes
146
The Litchfield race is very nice - very pretty. It’s not the toughest course, but there is a laugh-out-loud hill right after mile six on Gallows Lane.

Hardest race I have ever done is the Escarpment Trail Run - it’s a 30K trail race over the five high peaks in the Catskills. The uphills are tough, but you really feel the downhills in your legs for about a week afterwards. One of the landmarks near the end of the race is a plane that crashed into the side of the mountain....you know you’ve been through something when you’re happy to see a plane crash.
The problem with the Litchfield Hills Road Race is that it begins at 1pm the second Sunday in June. It’s usually hot as hell. I always tried to get in some training runs when it’s hot and humid to prepare. But like you said it’s a pretty course.

I ran from the time I was 14 until age 57. I started braking down and had to quit running two years ago. I really miss it. If I had to do over again, I would not have run marathons. Also, I would have started using the run/walk method in my 30s or 40s. For me, run / walk was way easier on my body.

Now I Ruck. It gives a strength and cardio workout. No injuries from it so far.
 

Top Bottom