Films Worth Viewing

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Since I am older than dirt, and I have watched movies regularly for almost as long, and I own over 2,000 films, Ihave been thinking about doing a sort of series on watchable films. Those who have long memories perhaps will recall my beer of the week series.
If there is interest, I propose a film a week with some alternatives to allow for different tastes and difficulty in finding the first choice.

I propose to continue the series as long as there is interest.
 

8893

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Thirded.

Suggested beer, pie or soup pairings as appropriate might also be a nice bonus feature on occasion.
 
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This is my initial trilogy. Three films vastly different, but with the continuity of a journey taken All three are worth viewing

The first film is "Oldboy", director Park Chung-wook. This Korean film premiered in 2003.

This is a remarkable film; for a good part of the film I wasn't sure what was going on. The protagonist is imprisoned for fifteen years without knowing the reason. He isn't likable; he has been working years to break out. Suddenly he is released on a rooftop with a suitcase full of clothes. There is a man on a ledge, holding a dog, preparing to jump. Dae su, the hero, stops him and forces the jumper to listen to the story of his 15 year imprisonment. The jumper pleads with him to listen to his story. Dae su ignores him, while he is walking down the street; the man jumps. Dae su isn't looking as he walks away. We don't know what happens to the dog.

Then things get complicated. We follow Dae su in his search for the truth and revenge for his imprisonment. The journey is harrowing physically, mentally, and emotionally. This is not a comfortable film. I don't use the word great for many films. This is one of the few that merits such a rating.

Next up one of the most celebrated children's films of all time, "The Red Balloon."
 
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Agreed, great movie. The hallway hammer scene is an all timer. The level of malevolence in the twist at the time, left me stunned.

I never did get around to watching the other two films from that trilogy.

Obviously the Spike Lee remake is not worth anyones time.
 
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I caught Oldboy at Cinestudio back when. It's great but I have to admit I may have closed my eyes a few times.
 
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"The Red Balloon" directed by Albert Lamorisse was released in 1956. 16 mm prints were shown widely in the US in schools. It is finally available on DVD; it is part of the Crirterion Collection. I highly recommend their
work.

A young boy finds a very large red balloon attached to a lamp post. He climbs up and detaches it holding the rope in his teeth. This begins a short (34 minutes) film where the young boy has a series of adventures with the balloon which has a mind of its own. Sometimes the balloon obeys the boy's requests; other times the
balloon shows its independence. One example is when it goes after a blue balloon held by a young girl.

The balloon is enormously attractive to children:however, among those children are those who wish to destroy
it. The balloon is destroyed. The film still ends on a uplifting note

This is a great gift idea for children.

Next up "The Last Temptation of Christ."
 

Dove

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So, we read your reviews and go, "ahhhh."? How am I supposed to find Oldboy?
 
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Oldboy is available on DVD. Go on Amazon, not sure what a used copy is going for, but a couple of suggestions: 1. opt for good quality or higher, and 2. if you can, select a Goodwill local as a seller. Try your local library. Even if your local branch doesn't have it, your library may well share resources with other libraries in your area.
 
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Just checked Amazon: you are better off buying it new"$13.31, or if you have Amazon Prime, you can stream it free if you sign up for a trial with either of two lesser known streaming services.
 
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"The Last Temptation of Christ" directed by Martin Scorsese premiered in 1988. Based on a book by Nikos Kazantzakis ,itself very controversial, the film was widely denounced as blasphemy. Noted reviewers including Roger Ebert found themselves using their reviews to respond to the religious critics. On a personal note, the Kazantzakis' book was a favorite of mine. It is one of the very few I can remember very clearly for a half a century. In the book and film Jesus is depicted as the Son of Man. He begins as a carpenter making crucifixes.
He is tormented by headaches which cripple him and a voice within.

The movie traces his short ministry in a series of episodes. The journey from man to God is illuminated by these
episodes. Jesus is tempted by the Devil in the wilderness. He finally understands that he must sacrifice his life upon the cross to fulfill his destiny. In this version of the Passion, Jesus convinces Judas to betray him.

Willem Dafoe seems an unusual choice for Jesus, but Harvey Keitel is an arresting Judas. This is a provocative
and unsettling film. I realize that both the subject matter and the treatment are not everyone's choice of viewing matter. Still films can and should at least sometimes make us go beyond mere enjoyment. If you think this introduction is hyperbolic claptrap; I can see your point of view.

Next week: "The Seven Samurai", "The Magnificent Seven," and "Breaking Away."
 

ZooCougar

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"The Last Temptation of Christ" directed by Martin Scorsese premiered in 1988. Based on a book by Nikos Kazantzakis ,itself very controversial, the film was widely denounced as blasphemy. Noted reviewers including Roger Ebert found themselves using their reviews to respond to the religious critics. On a personal note, the Kazantzakis' book was a favorite of mine. It is one of the very few I can remember very clearly for a half a century. In the book and film Jesus is depicted as the Son of Man. He begins as a carpenter making crucifixes.
He is tormented by headaches which cripple him and a voice within.

The movie traces his short ministry in a series of episodes. The journey from man to God is illuminated by these
episodes. Jesus is tempted by the Devil in the wilderness. He finally understands that he must sacrifice his life upon the cross to fulfill his destiny. In this version of the Passion, Jesus convinces Judas to betray him.

Willem Dafoe seems an unusual choice for Jesus, but Harvey Keitel is an arresting Judas. This is a provocative
and unsettling film. I realize that both the subject matter and the treatment are not everyone's choice of viewing matter. Still films can and should at least sometimes make us go beyond mere enjoyment. If you think this introduction is hyperbolic claptrap; I can see your point of view.

Next week: "The Seven Samurai", "The Magnificent Seven," and "Breaking Away."
Just from looking at what you have reviewed and what is coming up. You have great taste. These are all fantastic movies.
 

ZooCougar

Shut Up Carl.
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"The Last Temptation of Christ" directed by Martin Scorsese premiered in 1988. Based on a book by Nikos Kazantzakis ,itself very controversial, the film was widely denounced as blasphemy. Noted reviewers including Roger Ebert found themselves using their reviews to respond to the religious critics. On a personal note, the Kazantzakis' book was a favorite of mine. It is one of the very few I can remember very clearly for a half a century. In the book and film Jesus is depicted as the Son of Man. He begins as a carpenter making crucifixes.
He is tormented by headaches which cripple him and a voice within.

The movie traces his short ministry in a series of episodes. The journey from man to God is illuminated by these
episodes. Jesus is tempted by the Devil in the wilderness. He finally understands that he must sacrifice his life upon the cross to fulfill his destiny. In this version of the Passion, Jesus convinces Judas to betray him.

Willem Dafoe seems an unusual choice for Jesus, but Harvey Keitel is an arresting Judas. This is a provocative
and unsettling film. I realize that both the subject matter and the treatment are not everyone's choice of viewing matter. Still films can and should at least sometimes make us go beyond mere enjoyment. If you think this introduction is hyperbolic claptrap; I can see your point of view.

Next week: "The Seven Samurai", "The Magnificent Seven," and "Breaking Away."
We could probably have a whole thread reviewing Kurosawa’s influence on American cinema. The Seven Samurai and Yojimbo have been remade/copied umpteen times. Even Star Wars is basically very similar to The Hidden Fortress.
 

8893

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We could probably have a whole thread reviewing Kurosawa’s influence on American cinema. The Seven Samurai and Yojimbo have been remade/copied umpteen times. Even Star Wars is basically very similar to The Hidden Fortress.
I watched The Magnificent Seven last night, based on The Seven Samurai.
 

storrsroars

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We could probably have a whole thread reviewing Kurosawa’s influence on American cinema. The Seven Samurai and Yojimbo have been remade/copied umpteen times. Even Star Wars is basically very similar to The Hidden Fortress.
Not to mention Rashomon, which was inspiration for many later films and TV shows that rely on alternative perspectives from various characters to tell a story, including Usual Suspects, Gone Girl, Courage Under Fire, among others.

I should probably rewatch Last Temptation of Christ. Back when I originally saw it, I was not in a particularly charitable or receptive mood regarding organized religion and didn't really judge it as a movie or even art. Haven't watched it in 30 years.
 
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As mentioned, Magnificent Seven was an official English language remake of Seven Samurai, turned into a western. Yojimbo, another great Kurosawa movie, was turned into another well known western, A Fistful of Dollars. That one was unofficial, and it resulted in a lawsuit against Sergio Leone and company. I haven't watched Seven Samarai since my college days at UConn, at some point I'll have to get back to that one. Meanwhile, Magnificent Seven has become in recent years one of my favorite westerns.
 
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Since I am older than dirt, and I have watched movies regularly for almost as long, and I own over 2,000 films, Ihave been thinking about doing a sort of series on watchable films. Those who have long memories perhaps will recall my beer of the week series.
If there is interest, I propose a film a week with some alternatives to allow for different tastes and difficulty in finding the first choice.

I propose to continue the series as long as there is interest.
zymurg....holy crap, I though you bought it years ago. How are you?

Add this one to your list, and I'm in....."The Blue Lagoon"....not the Brooke Shields remake which was junk, but the original British version filmed back in the late 1940's starring a very young Jean Simmons, Donald Huston, and Cyril Cusack. Almost impossible now to get on home video, but someone recently uploaded a decent print onto YouTube.
 
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I am still alive, and I am currently working on my next series of introductions. I have put some of my movies in storage; of course my response was to buy more movies. The immediate upshot was that "The Seven Samurai"
is one of the films so re-located. I like to watch films immediately prior to writing introductions, but my memory is clear enough to write about "The Seven Samurai." So look for my next trilogy beginning probably next Tuesday.
 

intlzncster

i fart in your general direction
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This is my initial trilogy. Three films vastly different, but with the continuity of a journey taken All three are worth viewing

The first film is "Oldboy", director Park Chung-wook. This Korean film premiered in 2003.

This is a remarkable film; for a good part of the film I wasn't sure what was going on. The protagonist is imprisoned for fifteen years without knowing the reason. He isn't likable; he has been working years to break out. Suddenly he is released on a rooftop with a suitcase full of clothes. There is a man on a ledge, holding a dog, preparing to jump. Dae su, the hero, stops him and forces the jumper to listen to the story of his 15 year imprisonment. The jumper pleads with him to listen to his story. Dae su ignores him, while he is walking down the street; the man jumps. Dae su isn't looking as he walks away. We don't know what happens to the dog.

Then things get complicated. We follow Dae su in his search for the truth and revenge for his imprisonment. The journey is harrowing physically, mentally, and emotionally. This is not a comfortable film. I don't use the word great for many films. This is one of the few that merits such a rating.

Next up one of the most celebrated children's films of all time, "The Red Balloon."
Old Boy, Great film.

I think I've seen the red balloon about 20 years ago.
 

intlzncster

i fart in your general direction
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"The Red Balloon" directed by Albert Lamorisse was released in 1956. 16 mm prints were shown widely in the US in schools. It is finally available on DVD; it is part of the Crirterion Collection. I highly recommend their
work.

A young boy finds a very large red balloon attached to a lamp post. He climbs up and detaches it holding the rope in his teeth. This begins a short (34 minutes) film where the young boy has a series of adventures with the balloon which has a mind of its own. Sometimes the balloon obeys the boy's requests; other times the
balloon shows its independence. One example is when it goes after a blue balloon held by a young girl.

The balloon is enormously attractive to children:however, among those children are those who wish to destroy
it. The balloon is destroyed. The film still ends on a uplifting note

This is a great gift idea for children.

Next up "The Last Temptation of Christ."
I often steer clear of pure religious films, as a rule. But I love Willem Dafoe. WIll have to see if I break my rule here.
 
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Not to mention Rashomon, which was inspiration for many later films and TV shows that rely on alternative perspectives from various characters to tell a story, including Usual Suspects, Gone Girl, Courage Under Fire, among others.

I should probably rewatch Last Temptation of Christ. Back when I originally saw it, I was not in a particularly charitable or receptive mood regarding organized religion and didn't really judge it as a movie or even art. Haven't watched it in 30 years.
The Usual Suspects, is that the one where Kevin Spacey goes around to all the frat parties grabbing guys by the crotch?
 

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