OT: Tom "Terrific" Seaver Has Dementia

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#1
Hate to spoil game night but sad news for all of us Met fans and baseball in general. Tom is a class act and one of the best of all times. Loved watching him pitch and can still picture his right leg dragging the dirt during his delivery. I once had my hands on a foul ball from Seaver to Willie McCovey. Heartbreaking when you read he "will retire from public life ".

Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver has been diagnosed with dementia and will retire from public life, his family announced on Thursday.In a statement released by the Hall of Fame, Seaver's family expressed thanks to those who have supported the New York Mets great throughout his career and asked for privacy.Tom Seaver recorded 311 wins, 3,640 strikeouts, 61 shutouts and a 2.86 ERA during his 20-year career. Louis Requena/MLB Photos via Getty ImagesSeaver, 74, helped propel the Miracle Mets of 1969 to a World Series title. The right-hander, known as "Tom Terrific," won the Cy Young Award that year and led the National League with 25 wins.The Mets, who retired Seaver's No. 41 in 1988, are celebrating the 1969 team on June 29. They released a statement on Thursday saying they plan to honor Seaver, even though he will not be able to attend the ceremonies.View image on Twitter





Ed Kranepool, Seaver's teammate on the 1969 Mets, told the Berger Record, "He always handled himself with dignity and class. My wife Monica and I have the Seavers in our prayers."
Ron Swoboda, another member of that team, said "Nobody competed like Tom Seaver. I was proud to be his teammate."
Another Met in the Baseball Hall of Fame, Mike Piazza, posted on social media Thursday, "He will always be the heart and soul of the Mets, the standard which all Mets aspire to."
Piazza, whose career did not overlap with Seavers', said "This breaks my heart. Do not feel worthy to be mentioned in the same breath, yet honored to be with him in the Baseball Hall of Fame."
Seaver, the 1967 Rookie of the Year, was selected to the All-Star Game 12 times, led the league in strikeouts five times and won three Cy Young Awards. He finished his career with 311 wins and 3,640 strikeouts.
He also pitched for the Cincinnati Reds and Chicago White Sox, and finished his 20-year career with the Boston Red Sox in 1986. Seaver was a first-ballot Hall of Famer in 1992, receiving 98.8 percent of the vote.
Seaver's family says he will continue to work in the vineyard at his home in California.
 
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#2
Hate to spoil game night but sad news for all of us Met fans and baseball in general. Tom is a class act and one of the best of all times. Loved watching him pitch and can still picture his right leg dragging the dirt during his delivery. I once had my hands on a foul ball from Seaver to Willie McCovey. Heartbreaking when you read he "will retire from public life ".

Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver has been diagnosed with dementia and will retire from public life, his family announced on Thursday.In a statement released by the Hall of Fame, Seaver's family expressed thanks to those who have supported the New York Mets great throughout his career and asked for privacy.Tom Seaver recorded 311 wins, 3,640 strikeouts, 61 shutouts and a 2.86 ERA during his 20-year career. Louis Requena/MLB Photos via Getty ImagesSeaver, 74, helped propel the Miracle Mets of 1969 to a World Series title. The right-hander, known as "Tom Terrific," won the Cy Young Award that year and led the National League with 25 wins.The Mets, who retired Seaver's No. 41 in 1988, are celebrating the 1969 team on June 29. They released a statement on Thursday saying they plan to honor Seaver, even though he will not be able to attend the ceremonies.View image on Twitter



Ed Kranepool, Seaver's teammate on the 1969 Mets, told the Berger Record, "He always handled himself with dignity and class. My wife Monica and I have the Seavers in our prayers."
Ron Swoboda, another member of that team, said "Nobody competed like Tom Seaver. I was proud to be his teammate."
Another Met in the Baseball Hall of Fame, Mike Piazza, posted on social media Thursday, "He will always be the heart and soul of the Mets, the standard which all Mets aspire to."
Piazza, whose career did not overlap with Seavers', said "This breaks my heart. Do not feel worthy to be mentioned in the same breath, yet honored to be with him in the Baseball Hall of Fame."
Seaver, the 1967 Rookie of the Year, was selected to the All-Star Game 12 times, led the league in strikeouts five times and won three Cy Young Awards. He finished his career with 311 wins and 3,640 strikeouts.
He also pitched for the Cincinnati Reds and Chicago White Sox, and finished his 20-year career with the Boston Red Sox in 1986. Seaver was a first-ballot Hall of Famer in 1992, receiving 98.8 percent of the vote.
Seaver's family says he will continue to work in the vineyard at his home in California.
My first idol. Sad news
 

storrsroars

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#3
My first idol. Sad news
Yep. I used Seaver as a model for developing a pitcher's body, or at least a rationalization as to why my thighs are still more developed than the rest of my body even at 62 and why I never did curls or presses ;-)

Anyway, that didn't help my fastball, lol.

Very sad to hear this. I enjoyed his opinions on baseball and the Mets and still sadly recall him (and all Mets fans) being devastated by the "midnight massacre".
 
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#5
I was 6 years old in 1972 and Topps put out cards within their set that made a Tom Seaver puzzle with the reverse side. Even as a kid you could tell he was a Hall of Fame caliber guy.

Truly sad news.
20190307_202712.jpg
 
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#7
Mets fan of almost 40 years. I missed the Seaver Mets era and don't really remember the Seaver Reds years. To be honest, I was always confused why so many Mets fans held him as the symbol of the franchise.....but the franchise really didn't ever do anything to keep him involved or celebrate his legacy.

Case in point. Why is it the Jackie Robinson Rotunda at CitiField and not Seaver? Why is there not a statue of Seaver anywhere in the new facility? There's a "Shea Bridge" in centerfield. Why not the Seaver Bridge? I don't know. I feel like there's a disconnect. Hopefully they do the right thing, albeit a bit late, and make sure he's solidified in his spot in team history there.
 

storrsroars

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#8
Mets fan of almost 40 years. I missed the Seaver Mets era and don't really remember the Seaver Reds years. To be honest, I was always confused why so many Mets fans held him as the symbol of the franchise.....but the franchise really didn't ever do anything to keep him involved or his legacy.

Case in point. Why is it the Jackie Robinson Rotunda at CitiField and not Seaver? Why is there not a statue of Seaver anywhere in the new facility? There's a "Shea Bridge" in centerfield. Why not the Seaver Bridge? I don't know. I feel like there's a disconnect. Hopefully they do the right thing, albeit a bit late, and make sure he's solidified in his spot in team history there.
Mets only have five retired numbers: Jackie Robinson, Casey Stengel (not really sure why?), Gil Hodges, Tom Seaver and Mike Piazza. Pretty small list there. Amazingly nobody from the 86 Champs.
 

whaler11

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#9
I know Seaver is a Met, but when you are born in 1973 you picture him with the White Sox.
 

8893

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#10
I know Seaver is a Met, but when you are born in 1973 you picture him with the White Sox.
Funny, you recently referred to us as the same age. I knew you were younger but not sure how much; but I’m not going to fight being considered younger these days. And even if you said the difference was seven years—which it is—I’d have likely agreed it’s not much.

But in this context it makes a big difference. I remember watching the 1973 World Series and I remember being devastated when Seaver was traded in 1977. I still have the SI issue with him in the Reds hat.
 

whaler11

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#11
Funny, you recently referred to us as the same age. I knew you were younger but not sure how much; but I’m not going to fight being considered younger these days. And even if you said the difference was seven years—which it is—I’d have likely agreed it’s not much.

But in this context it makes a big difference. I remember watching the 1973 World Series and I remember being devastated when Seaver was traded in 1977. I still have the SI issue with him in the Reds hat.
Just took a walk through his numbers and it makes sense why I best remember him with the White Sox. Those years at that age were ridiculous.

Warner Fusselle must have been in my ear every week about it.
 
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#12
I read this online and cried. I remember 67 when he won ROY. 69 was probably my favorite WS. "Who the hell is Rod Gaspar. Koosman was the pitcher in the series. Family has no idea what they are in for . When Shamsky spoke of him repeating himself often...That was my wife around a year ago. Saying the same thing every couple minutes. Of course now she is 60 and well into stage 7. So yeah it hit close to home.
 
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#13
I read this online and cried. I remember 67 when he won ROY. 69 was probably my favorite WS. "Who the hell is Rod Gaspar. Koosman was the pitcher in the series. Family has no idea what they are in for . When Shamsky spoke of him repeating himself often...That was my wife around a year ago. Saying the same thing every couple minutes. Of course now she is 60 and well into stage 7. So yeah it hit close to home.
Madmannsucks...I’m sorry to hear about your wife. I know its horrible seeing a loved one going through this. Wishing you and your family the best.
 
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#14
Mets only have five retired numbers: Jackie Robinson, Casey Stengel (not really sure why?), Gil Hodges, Tom Seaver and Mike Piazza. Pretty small list there. Amazingly nobody from the 86 Champs.
Casey was their first manager.

Saw my first Mets game at the Polo Grounds. Loved their run in 1969.

Was born in Brooklyn to a diehard Dodger fan while they still played at Ebbets Field. Never went to a game there though. In spite of that, I gravitated to the Giants, even after they left NY too.
 

storrsroars

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#15
Casey was their first manager.
And?

Since 1960, there have been 14 teams added to MLB. Besides Stengel, the only "first manager" among those teams with a retired number is Don Baylor of the Rockies. And he had three winning seasons and made the playoffs. Stengel had his number retired for his previous history with NYC baseball, not because he achieved anything with the Mets. How his # is retired and not Davey Johnson's is ridiculous.
 
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#16
Mets fan of almost 40 years. I missed the Seaver Mets era and don't really remember the Seaver Reds years. To be honest, I was always confused why so many Mets fans held him as the symbol of the franchise.....but the franchise really didn't ever do anything to keep him involved or celebrate his legacy.

Case in point. Why is it the Jackie Robinson Rotunda at CitiField and not Seaver? Why is there not a statue of Seaver anywhere in the new facility? There's a "Shea Bridge" in centerfield. Why not the Seaver Bridge? I don't know. I feel like there's a disconnect. Hopefully they do the right thing, albeit a bit late, and make sure he's solidified in his spot in team history there.
Because that organization has been run by a bunch of imbeciles for a very long time.
 
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#17
Not a baseball fan, so I'm not really familiar with him. Unfortunately I am familiar with dementia. Had a friend who recently died in their early 60's from it.
 
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#19
Casey was their first manager.

Saw my first Mets game at the Polo Grounds. Loved their run in 1969.

Was born in Brooklyn to a diehard Dodger fan while they still played at Ebbets Field. Never went to a game there though. In spite of that, I gravitated to the Giants, even after they left NY too.
I don't remember the year but the Mets may have had the greatest starting rotation in the history of baseball. Seaver, rookie Nolan Ryan, Koosman, and one more....I think John Matlack?
 
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#20
I don't remember the year but the Mets may have had the greatest starting rotation in the history of baseball. Seaver, rookie Nolan Ryan, Koosman, and one more....I think John Matlack?
Jon Matlack had limited games in 1971 (RoY in '72) which was the only year he and Ryan were both Mets. and Gary Gentry. with Tug McGraw in the bullpen. Nolan's career didn't take off until he was an ex-Met.
 
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Chin Diesel

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#21
A few years too young to see him in his prime, but he is a legend for a reason.

His stuff was nasty.

Legit chance to throw a no no any start.
 

UConnNick

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#22
I read this online and cried. I remember 67 when he won ROY. 69 was probably my favorite WS. "Who the hell is Rod Gaspar. Koosman was the pitcher in the series. Family has no idea what they are in for . When Shamsky spoke of him repeating himself often...That was my wife around a year ago. Saying the same thing every couple minutes. Of course now she is 60 and well into stage 7. So yeah it hit close to home.
So sorry about your wife, Madmann. Thoughts and prayers to you and your family.

Your post reminded me of my dad. He became a huge Mets fan during that summer of '69. He listened to all of the Cubs games on a very powerful German radio that could receive signals seemingly from outer space. He delighted in every Mets win and Cubs loss down the stretch.

Your mention of Art Shamsky reminded me of a baseball game I had as a kid...Strat-o-matic. It was all based on stats and probabilities from the 1966 season, I think it was. Shamsky was a utility outfielder for the Reds that season. He hit a ridiculous number of homers that season, a lot as a pinch hitter, I think 20. When you played the game you always played him in your starting lineup because he would hit HRs like crazy, due to his incredible HR to limited AB ratio.

The amazin' Mets of 1969...Tommie Agee, Ron Swoboda, Ed Kranepool, and that all-world pitching staff...Tom Seaver, Nolan Ryan, Jerry Koosman. I remember that season like it was yesterday.
 

storrsroars

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#23
I don't remember the year but the Mets may have had the greatest starting rotation in the history of baseball. Seaver, rookie Nolan Ryan, Koosman, and one more....I think John Matlack?
Seaver, Koosman (who was arguably the better pitcher in '69), Gary Gentry, Jim McAndrew, Don Cardwell, with Ryan making a handful of starts. IIRC, all had ERA's under 4, with Seaver & Koos under 3. Great rotation, but not the best in MLB history.
 
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#24
So sorry about your wife, Madmann. Thoughts and prayers to you and your family.

Your post reminded me of my dad. He became a huge Mets fan during that summer of '69. He listened to all of the Cubs games on a very powerful German radio that could receive signals seemingly from outer space. He delighted in every Mets win and Cubs loss down the stretch.

Your mention of Art Shamsky reminded me of a baseball game I had as a kid...Strat-o-matic. It was all based on stats and probabilities from the 1966 season, I think it was. Shamsky was a utility outfielder for the Reds that season. He hit a ridiculous number of homers that season, a lot as a pinch hitter, I think 20. When you played the game you always played him in your starting lineup because he would hit HRs like crazy, due to his incredible HR to limited AB ratio.

The amazin' Mets of 1969...Tommie Agee, Ron Swoboda, Ed Kranepool, and that all-world pitching staff...Tom Seaver, Nolan Ryan, Jerry Koosman. I remember that season like it was yesterday.
We, mom, dad, and I fell in love with the 69 team. Left out Cleon Jones, Ed Charles, Rod Gaspar, Harrelson, Grote, et al. We went to a weeknight game against the Cubs. Fergie Jenkins shut the Mets down. Sold out. In 1993 we spread my dad's ashes along 3rd base line at the old Shea.
 
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#25
Seaver, Koosman (who was arguably the better pitcher in '69), Gary Gentry, Jim McAndrew, Don Cardwell, with Ryan making a handful of starts. IIRC, all had ERA's under 4, with Seaver & Koos under 3. Great rotation, but not the best in MLB history.
I remember the Mets beat the Bucs in both games of a D/H by a 1 to 0 score in 1969. Koosman and Cardwell each pitched a CG shutout, and also both runs were driven in by the pitchers.
 
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