Is the AAC even P6?

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#1
As UConn considers its future conference affiliations its position in football is much different than its position in basketball.

Football peaked at the right time for UConn. UConn had its best foot forward for CR when it unfolded, it just didn’t work out.

As we look forward it might be better to look at what is best for each Revenue Sport.

UConn football as a program has been bad the last half dozen years or so. The outlook for the coming years is uncertain. A recovery is not convincing yet. The AAC for all of its faults is a good spot for UConn football. There is some revenue and good competition. The AAC isn’t so great, however, as to make it a no brainer vs other options, such as independence in football.

For all it’s P6 rhetoric the AAC is not a consensus Top 6 program in either sport. In hoops it’s definitely not Top 6. In football MW has a claim to Top 6. I’m not even sure what P6 is worth, but it is a campaign that is questionable when performance is Top 7ish.

For performance, history, and future UConn is a basketball-first University. The return in the coming years is convincing for hoops. The AAC is Top 7 in hoops and also is footprint challenged with a lack of regional rivals. I’m not sure where the AAC tournament is played.

The Big East is clearly a superior basketball conference. UConn is a great fit for our NYC centric conference. There are some differences, but the basketball first nature of UConn fits the conference mission along with the NYC presence and MSG tournament.

Olympic sports benefit from the more regional footprint, as a small aside.

If not for football, basketball to the Big East is the logical move.

With football, going Big East and keeping football in the AAC or as an independent are credible options.
 

Stainmaster

Occasionally Constructive
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#5
As UConn considers its future conference affiliations its position in football is much different than its position in basketball.

Football peaked at the right time for UConn. UConn had its best foot forward for CR when it unfolded, it just didn’t work out.

As we look forward it might be better to look at what is best for each Revenue Sport.

UConn football as a program has been bad the last half dozen years or so. The outlook for the coming years is uncertain. A recovery is not convincing yet. The AAC for all of its faults is a good spot for UConn football. There is some revenue and good competition. The AAC isn’t so great, however, as to make it a no brainer vs other options, such as independence in football.

For all it’s P6 rhetoric the AAC is not a consensus Top 6 program in either sport. In hoops it’s definitely not Top 6. In football MW has a claim to Top 6. I’m not even sure what P6 is worth, but it is a campaign that is questionable when performance is Top 7ish.

For performance, history, and future UConn is a basketball-first University. The return in the coming years is convincing for hoops. The AAC is Top 7 in hoops and also is footprint challenged with a lack of regional rivals. I’m not sure where the AAC tournament is played.

The Big East is clearly a superior basketball conference. UConn is a great fit for our NYC centric conference. There are some differences, but the basketball first nature of UConn fits the conference mission along with the NYC presence and MSG tournament.

Olympic sports benefit from the more regional footprint, as a small aside.

If not for football, basketball to the Big East is the logical move.

With football, going Big East and keeping football in the AAC or as an independent are credible options.
Your conference will be the equivalent of the best FCS football conference in 15-20 years. None of this matters.
 
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#7
“Why are you so confident of a pending P5 invite?”

“Well, a couple of years ago, on this Wake Forest blog, a couple of the bloggers said we had a chance. A REAL chance. No Shite! You can look it up!”
 
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#10
The Big Ten also will allow games vs. Cincinnati and Connecticut, of the American Athletic Conference, to count as a Power 5 opponent, Big Ten senior associate commissioner Mark Rudner said. A source said Navy, in its first year in AAC, will also count. However, not all members of the AAC will count toward the Power 5 nonconference requirement, a source told ESPN.

Big Ten OKs Irish, 5 others for Power 5 quota
 

huskeynut

Leader of the Band
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#11
As UConn considers its future conference affiliations its position in football is much different than its position in basketball.

Football peaked at the right time for UConn. UConn had its best foot forward for CR when it unfolded, it just didn’t work out.

As we look forward it might be better to look at what is best for each Revenue Sport.

UConn football as a program has been bad the last half dozen years or so. The outlook for the coming years is uncertain. A recovery is not convincing yet. The AAC for all of its faults is a good spot for UConn football. There is some revenue and good competition. The AAC isn’t so great, however, as to make it a no brainer vs other options, such as independence in football.

For all it’s P6 rhetoric the AAC is not a consensus Top 6 program in either sport. In hoops it’s definitely not Top 6. In football MW has a claim to Top 6. I’m not even sure what P6 is worth, but it is a campaign that is questionable when performance is Top 7ish.

For performance, history, and future UConn is a basketball-first University. The return in the coming years is convincing for hoops. The AAC is Top 7 in hoops and also is footprint challenged with a lack of regional rivals. I’m not sure where the AAC tournament is played.

The Big East is clearly a superior basketball conference. UConn is a great fit for our NYC centric conference. There are some differences, but the basketball first nature of UConn fits the conference mission along with the NYC presence and MSG tournament.

Olympic sports benefit from the more regional footprint, as a small aside.

If not for football, basketball to the Big East is the logical move.

With football, going Big East and keeping football in the AAC or as an independent are credible options.
You can stop posting this nonsense. There is no desire to return to the New Big East. Just because its the only option you have, doesn't mean it has to be ours.
 
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#16
The B1G is only going to expand for some combination of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas - choose 2 of 3. The SEC will also only expand if it can get either Texas or Oklahoma from the Big12. The ACC will add Notre Dame and whoever ND wants - or maybe just ND. The PAC12 has nowhere to expand. The BIG12 has already rejected the idea of expansion. In any case, its implosion is the likely necessary pre-condition for new changes. So really the options for future realignment are limited. The financials just don't work except for a very few cases.

The most likely outcome therefore is preservation of the status quo. No one is going anywhere. Which means the schools in the AAC have every incentive to make the AAC as high quality as they can. (So, yes, they should all sign the grant of media rights for example.) Going elsewhere means going down in the pecking order. The New Big East especially is a chimera that won't hold its value over time.
 
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#17
“Why are you so confident of a pending P5 invite?”

“Well, a couple of years ago, on this Wake Forest blog, a couple of the bloggers said we had a chance. A REAL chance. No Shite! You can look it up!”
That should make people more confident if a school like Wake considers us a lock, when they are at the bottom of their own conference.

You are truly obtuse.
 
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#18
Wake is not the bottom of the ACC. Have won a bowl three years in a row, this year against a team that smoked us (yes, almost everybody smoked us). Clawson has done a great job there.
 
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#21
That's just your opinion, man. Other UConn alumni feel differently.
And others feel that Villanova's self-centered vote in 1982 put the first nail in the coffin that the true Big East was eventually buried in; but, that's just the opinion of some UConn alumni and the first two Big East commissioners - Dave Gavitt and Mike Tranghese.
 
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#23
And others feel that Villanova's self-centered vote in 1982 put the first nail in the coffin that the true Big East was eventually buried in; but, that's just the opinion of some UConn alumni and the first two Big East commissioners - Dave Gavitt and Mike Tranghese.
It was Pitt or PSU for a basketball first conference based on northeast metro areas. Pitt may have been the better fit.

PSU as a football power and a hoops light weight still joins the Big 10 before the major shake ups ever take place.

Mike T.’s stories on the history are self serving. The old Big East was not destined to failure. It failed because men (presidents and conference leaders) could not deal with each other honestly or for a greater purpose. Better leadership may have changed the history more than a decision on Pitt vs PSU, and with that the bigger issue for Mike T was probably Mike T.
 
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#25
By all accounts, yes
On the court, the new Big East is very similar to the current AAC as they both have 1 historically strong program (Villanova with 3 titles, UConn with 4 respectively), a small number of solid programs (G-town and Marquette with 1 title each and Cincinnati with 2) and others with varrying success or lack there of. So, if you consider the new Big East to be a major basketball conference, then the AAC must be one, also.
 
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