Change Ad Consent Hurley suggests the season shouldn't start on time. Clearly, he should retire! | Page 4 | The Boneyard

Hurley suggests the season shouldn't start on time. Clearly, he should retire!

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Chin Diesel

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To me it means we are approaching daily positive case numbers of New York State without a New York City. Our Governor refuses to give out daily information on current hospital bed utilization but I fear it is very high. My wife and I are 69, and we are very careful, but everyday see continued examples of stupidity, not observing social distancing walking into stores without a mask and championing the gotta die of something crowd that still smokes cigarettes. Once this settles into my age bracket, and it will, deaths will go up. My only hope is we know more about treatment now than we did in New York. To keep this in perspective about sports, I see no way teams from Florida, Arizona and Texas can travel this fall. My wife and I are headed to NY tomorrow we will have to quarantine for 2 weeks. If we have to then athletes should too, the virus doesn't know the difference.
Curious as to where you live. I get hospital bed numbers every day where I live. Three different hospital systems and each day they give updates. I wouldn't ever trust a statewide bed count because of the number of people who get moved in an out of ICU's for whatever reason throughout the day. By the time the state got reports from all the hospitals, assimilated it and put out a press release, the numbers would have already changed. I'm perfectly fine knowing a regional number of 2-3 surrounding counties.
 

Edward Sargent

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Curious as to where you live. I get hospital bed numbers every day where I live. Three different hospital systems and each day they give updates. I wouldn't ever trust a statewide bed count because of the number of people who get moved in an out of ICU's for whatever reason throughout the day. By the time the state got reports from all the hospitals, assimilated it and put out a press release, the numbers would have already changed. I'm perfectly fine knowing a regional number of 2-3 surrounding counties.
I am in Clearwater and get the numbers for our regional Baycare system and you are correct the regional numbers are more important.
 
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To me it means we are approaching daily positive case numbers of New York State without a New York City. Our Governor refuses to give out daily information on current hospital bed utilization but I fear it is very high. My wife and I are 69, and we are very careful, but everyday see continued examples of stupidity, not observing social distancing walking into stores without a mask and championing the gotta die of something crowd that still smokes cigarettes. Once this settles into my age bracket, and it will, deaths will go up. My only hope is we know more about treatment now than we did in New York. To keep this in perspective about sports, I see no way teams from Florida, Arizona and Texas can travel this fall. My wife and I are headed to NY tomorrow we will have to quarantine for 2 weeks. If we have to then athletes should too, the virus doesn't know the difference.
You said, "10,000 positive tests today, only a couple thousand more than the highest single day number of cases in the world."

I still have no clue what this means? It makes no sense.
 

Edward Sargent

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You said, "10,000 positive tests today, only a couple thousand more than the highest single day number of cases in the world."

I still have no clue what this means? It makes no sense.
10,000 new COVID cases is what I meant.
 
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Had to go into my office today at the university. I passed maybe 8 or 9 students the halls of my building. Zero of them had masks on.

Hello!!???!?!

Surprised we were even running in person summer classes.
 
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I think a lot of posters are not understanding Danny’s comments in context. He did talk about getting recruits on campus. He was dealing with the Sal’s BLM fallout, so some of his comments were particularly sensitive about various demographic categories. What may happen at the appropriate time, is people in those categories will express their preference and Danny will attempt to honor them. Unless, something dramatically changes the pressure not to play won’t cone from within our team and staff. Danny, in my judgement, is being smart not dictating his personal preference on others. It’s best to let them arrive to their own decision. .
 
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I think a lot of posters are not understanding Danny’s comments in context. He did talk about getting recruits on campus. He was dealing with the Sal’s BLM fallout, so some of his comments were particularly sensitive about various demographic categories. What may happen at the appropriate time, is people in those categories will express their preference and Danny will attempt to honor them. Unless, something dramatically changes the pressure not to play won’t cone from within our team and staff. Danny, in my judgement, is being smart not dictating his personal preference on others. It’s best to let them arrive to their own decision. .
What do you think about Jay Wright's comments?
 
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Just open up and play with limited fans or no fans at all. There have been deaths, but we know even more what demographics to protect. We also know that those death numbers are inflated for cash benefit. Infection mortality for under 50 years old is about 0.0037 percent...and under 60 it is .037 percent. If you take away comorbidities from any of those groups, you have a greater chance of dying from lightning. The upper age bracket, particularly with comorbidities has weighted the IMF numbers significantly. Cases are going up, and that is not necessarily a problem if the "right" people get it. From the last accountability report from Congress, the CDC was also combining antibody tests with a viral test. Over 45% of deaths have been in nursing homes. The product of common core math is apparent. This really isn't rocket science.
 

willie99

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The CDC has estimated that unknown COVID-19 cases are some 10x to 20x greater than known cases. So if we're testing more, we're absolutely positively going to find more cases. Furthermore, we're stepping up antibody testing, and we're learning about people who previously had COVID-19, and those numbers are also being included in new cases.

Hence the new cases numbers are significantly less relevant than what's being reported. You test more, you find the cases you already knew were out there. To me, new cases only become more concerning when the medical profession begins to say it's probable that inflicted individuals are significantly higher than the additional 20x greater they've already projected.

I'm not sure I've ever seen more inconsistent reporting in my life, it's borderline criminal. It's certainly not the behavior of good and honest men. We need the truth, and it's really hard to find.

I apologize to management for making a political post, I avoid that like the black plague around here, but it's seemingly being allowed in this thread.
 

Edward Sargent

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Just open up and play with limited fans or no fans at all. There have been deaths, but we know even more what demographics to protect. We also know that those death numbers are inflated for cash benefit. Infection mortality for under 50 years old is about 0.0037 percent...and under 60 it is .037 percent. If you take away comorbidities from any of those groups, you have a greater chance of dying from lightning. The upper age bracket, particularly with comorbidities has weighted the IMF numbers significantly. Cases are going up, and that is not necessarily a problem if the "right" people get it. From the last accountability report from Congress, the CDC was also combining antibody tests with a viral test. Over 45% of deaths have been in nursing homes. The product of common core math is apparent. This really isn't rocket science.
If only it were just simple math - its not
 
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I stand by my belief that you won’t be hearing from Danny Hurley that the season should start, just as you did not hear from him that the players should return to campus on 6/19. It’s appropriately a decision for others to make. At any rate, Coach Hurley knows he has no direct authority on this decision, it involves the NCAA, other schools, etc. The appropriate public position is just to express concerns about everyone staying healthy. Of course, this doesn’t imply that he doesn’t privately want good health for everyone. Of course he does. So please don’t mischaracterize what I am saying.
 

David 76

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Again
The CDC has estimated that unknown COVID-19 cases are some 10x to 20x greater than known cases. So if we're testing more, we're absolutely positively going to find more cases. Furthermore, we're stepping up antibody testing, and we're learning about people who previously had COVID-19, and those numbers are also being included in new cases.

Hence the new cases numbers are significantly less relevant than what's being reported. You test more, you find the cases you already knew were out there. To me, new cases only become more concerning when the medical profession begins to say it's probable that inflicted individuals are significantly higher than the additional 20x greater they've already projected.

I'm not sure I've ever seen more inconsistent reporting in my life, it's borderline criminal. It's certainly not the behavior of good and honest men. We need the truth, and it's really hard to find.

I apologize to management for making a political post, I avoid that like the black plague around here, but it's seemingly being allowed in this thread.
Your facts would be very reassuring if vulnerable people didn't work, shop and live with less vulnerable people. You can't have rampant spread, or any spread without threatening everyone.
 
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The CDC has estimated that unknown COVID-19 cases are some 10x to 20x greater than known cases. So if we're testing more, we're absolutely positively going to find more cases. Furthermore, we're stepping up antibody testing, and we're learning about people who previously had COVID-19, and those numbers are also being included in new cases.

Hence the new cases numbers are significantly less relevant than what's being reported. You test more, you find the cases you already knew were out there. To me, new cases only become more concerning when the medical profession begins to say it's probable that inflicted individuals are significantly higher than the additional 20x greater they've already projected.

I'm not sure I've ever seen more inconsistent reporting in my life, it's borderline criminal. It's certainly not the behavior of good and honest men. We need the truth, and it's really hard to find.

I apologize to management for making a political post, I avoid that like the black plague around here, but it's seemingly being allowed in this thread.
NYC did it right.

They started counting the numbers of people dying from heart attacks on their way to the hospital prior to testing. When there's a 1000% increase in such cases from month-to-month, there's something in the water.

Reminds me of the famous video from Bergamo Italy, where a guy drinking his morning coffee filmed himself reading a February 2020 newspaper, passing over the 1 page list of obituaries. He turns to the mid March newspaper and the obituary section goes on and on and on and on. 15+ pages. Increase of 1500%.
 
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From the article in the Register, seems to an issue with online classes:

The Toronto product needs to be registered in a course that is not completely online before obtaining his I-20 form to get to America. That means finding a course and a professor at UConn that would fit that need. Brown-Fergson would only need to have one in-person session with the professor, and the rest could be done online.
I may teach at UConn and I can tell you that most if not all professors hate the prospect of only online teaching this fall. For classes I’m involved in, we have come up with a plan for some blending of online-live. I would guess it should be fairly easy for the academic advisors to find at least one course for Javonte Brown Ferguson to allow this to happen.
 
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I may teach at UConn and I can tell you that most if not all professors hate the prospect of only online teaching this fall. For classes I’m involved in, we have come up with a plan for some blending of online-live. I would guess it should be fairly easy for the academic advisors to find at least one course for Javonte Brown Ferguson to allow this to happen.
Most of, if not all, professors AND students hate the idea of online only classes. But these schools need their money so I don’t think it matters to them.
 
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Most of, if not all, professors AND students hate the idea of online only classes. But these schools need their money so I don’t think it matters to them.
??

It would be the reverse, wouldn't it? They'd make MORE money with in person classes.

I read the NYT article about people not wanting to teach in person yesterday, and not one mention about in class dynamics for classes that aren't large lectures. Teaching students socially distanced, everyone with a mask on, but of course taping the class for students online at home (which we all must do now when we're in person so as not to run afoul of laws), is a recipe for perhaps an even worse learning/teaching experience than an online class. The only way this works is if no one wears a mask. For large lectures, there's much less of a difference between online and in person. For laboratory work, in person is invaluable.
 
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??

It would be the reverse, wouldn't it? They'd make MORE money with in person classes.

I read the NYT article about people not wanting to teach in person yesterday, and not one mention about in class dynamics for classes that aren't large lectures. Teaching students socially distanced, everyone with a mask on, but of course taping the class for students online at home (which we all must do now when we're in person so as not to run afoul of laws), is a recipe for perhaps an even worse learning/teaching experience than an online class. The only way this works is if no one wears a mask. For large lectures, there's much less of a difference between online and in person. For laboratory work, in person is invaluable.
The main point I’m trying to make is that it’s ridiculous how these schools will charge full tuition for fully online when it’s worth a fraction of in-person learning. If I was still at UConn, I’d either take community college credits or take a gap semester and work.
 
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The main point I’m trying to make is that it’s ridiculous how these schools will charge full tuition for fully online when it’s worth a fraction of in-person learning. If I was still at UConn, I’d either take community college credits or take a gap semester and work.
In a situation like we're experiencing now, where airlines are getting money so they don't go belly up, there is no way to assess value or cost or worth. The only thing to ask is, which corporations or institutions or non-profits are getting propped up by the Fed and treasury. The colleges have the choice to either fire staff (which will make them less like colleges and more like papermills) or charge what they otherwise would (in order to meet their responsibilities (fungible spending has been cut to the bone already, 90% reductions in dept. budgets at my school). Or, we could be more creative and have the federal gov't support these institutions the way airlines are getting support, which would allow them to give a break to families. I'm weighing these decisions for my own children, by the way, so I think you have a solid argument. But until these institutions see relief, there's not much they can do. I'm not calling up the headmaster at my kids' private school and telling him to cut everyone a break, because I know it will sink them. The only thing I can do is decide whether it's worth it to pay tuition for what MAY be online zoom lessons.
 
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??

It would be the reverse, wouldn't it? They'd make MORE money with in person classes.

I read the NYT article about people not wanting to teach in person yesterday, and not one mention about in class dynamics for classes that aren't large lectures. Teaching students socially distanced, everyone with a mask on, but of course taping the class for students online at home (which we all must do now when we're in person so as not to run afoul of laws), is a recipe for perhaps an even worse learning/teaching experience than an online class. The only way this works is if no one wears a mask. For large lectures, there's much less of a difference between online and in person. For laboratory work, in person is invaluable.
The great outdoors
 
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There were 700,000 tests yesterday. If the new case number did not go up it would be suspicious.

In case anyone is interested here are the daily death numbers (entire country) since the beginning of he pandemic. The brown line is the seven day moving average.
Screen Shot 2020-07-04 at 9.08.18 PM.png
 
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