Connecticut Wakes Up On NIL Legislation

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I have always thought a good idea would be that athletes can get paid for their NIL while under scholarship and the money goes to the school to be held in an escrow account and paid to the athlete when they graduate.
Telling young adults what to do with money they earned themselves will be a disaster.
 

Bald Huskie

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Just to understand! If Conn passes the NIL bill, and July 1 comes along. Does that mean Paige (just using her for an example) can sign with an agent, sign with Nike, and immediately receive multiple thousands of dollars as a sign on bonus? Is this all covered in the Bill, is this the reality of what will occur? crazzzzy
 
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Just to understand! If Conn passes the NIL bill, and July 1 comes along. Does that mean Paige (just using her for an example) can sign with an agent, sign with Nike, and immediately receive multiple thousands of dollars as a sign on bonus? Is this all covered in the Bill, is this the reality of what will occur? crazzzzy
Sure Paige can do that. But she'll never play for UConn ever again.
 
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What's the conflict?
The state laws are irrelevant as the NCAA is the sole arbiter for determining whether a player is eligible, and right now the rules say that if Paige does any of those things she will no longer be an eligible student-athlete. All of these state laws are kind of silly to be honest. They aren't making anything legal that's already not legal.
 
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The state laws are irrelevant as the NCAA is the sole arbiter for determining whether a player is eligible, and right now the rules say that if Paige does any of those things she will no longer be an eligible student-athlete. All of these state laws are kind of silly to be honest. They aren't making anything legal that's already not legal.
I see. NCAA is the boss.
 

the Q

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I see. NCAA is the boss.

As it should be

Of course I’d prefer them to be competent

But they should be the boss as a private association
 
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This is way more complicated than anyone realizes. I believe the NCAA understands that this is going to pass, and they are trying to move it through congress/Federal Government so the rules are the same for everyone. It every state has their own NIL rule/law it will be chaos. Every state has a different view of NIL. Emmert is very stubborn, but he is in front of this. There are many egos involved here.

An early version of the Iowa proposal stated:

" which proposed that when an athlete signs a financial aid agreement, he or she would choose to receive either room, board, books, tuition and cost-of-attendance stipends, or the freedom to monetize his or her NIL – but not both."

Iowa passed the bill, but no idea of the language
 
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This is way more complicated than anyone realizes. I believe the NCAA understands that this is going to pass, and they are trying to move it through congress/Federal Government so the rules are the same for everyone. It every state has their own NIL rule/law it will be chaos. Every state has a different view of NIL. Emmert is very stubborn, but he is in front of this. There are many egos involved here.

An early version of the Iowa proposal stated:

" which proposed that when an athlete signs a financial aid agreement, he or she would choose to receive either room, board, books, tuition and cost-of-attendance stipends, or the freedom to monetize his or her NIL – but not both."

Iowa passed the bill, but no idea of the language
It's actually not that complicated. Players can already make money off of their name, image, or likeness. Does anyone know the law or code that specifically bans people from doing that? What existing law do these new laws repeal? This is just more of what American law and politics has become: performative over practical.
 
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As it should be

Of course I’d prefer them to be competent

But they should be the boss as a private association
agreed 100% I really hope ppl appreciate someday how much a scholarship is worth, like you get to play the sport you love and never worry about anything education wise, and some of these schools have some of the best facilities you could ask for esp in cfb
 

oldude

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One additional complication to NIL legislation was reported today by ESPN. Foreign students, who currently represent 12% of all NCAA athletes, are restricted in the amount of money they can earn in the US by the terms of their student visa. So a player like Aaliyah would be severely limited in her ability to earn NIL compensation.

Perhaps the solution to this particular issue would be for some foreign athletes to swap out their student visas for green cards, which allow foreigners to live and work in the US. Of course that solution would result in another layer of complexity for NIL.
 

CL82

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Emmert is very stubborn, but he is in front of this. There are many egos involved here.
If he actually was in front of this, there would be no need for states to enact pointless legislation. The NCAA would have modified its rules a year ago and that would’ve been the end of it.
 

oldude

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If he actually was in front of this, there would be no need for states to enact pointless legislation. The NCAA would have modified its rules a year ago and that would’ve been the end of it.
Agree to a point. But to some extent, Emmert is simply a mouthpiece for NCAA member institutions who are trying to maintain complete control of all revenue, particularly in the face of a sizable loss in revenue during the pandemic.
 

CL82

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Agree to a point. But to some extent, Emmert is simply a mouthpiece for NCAA member institutions who are trying to maintain complete control of all revenue, particularly in the face of a sizable loss in revenue during the pandemic.
Keep in mind that is NIL funds are an earning opportunity. It isn't lost revenue to the NCAA member institutions. If Paige decides to monetize her Instagram account, it's not like that money comes out of UConn's pocket.
 

the Q

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Keep in mind that is NIL funds are an earning opportunity. It isn't lost revenue to the NCAA member institutions. If Paige decides to monetize her Instagram account, it's not like that money comes out of UConn's pocket.

Some of it certainly could.

Especially if they allow kids to violate current agreements like shoe deals
 

CL82

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Some of it certainly could.

Especially if they allow kids to violate current agreements like shoe deals
Unlikely, since, as I understand the concept, the kids do not have a right to wear the team uniforms in profit seeking ventures. The shoe is a part of the uniform. So a kid can talk about wearing adidas but on the court, he's wearing Nike, if that is the team shoe deal.
 
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What about the billboards a few years ago which advertised UConn game tickets by showing the face of Molly Bent (and several other players on other billboards)? Would Molly and the others have to be paid by the university for the use of their pictures in advertisements?

Routine items such as team pictures raise the same issue, particularly if they are sold as consumer items. Certainly clothing with a player's name and/or uniform number on it would raise an issue if it were sold in the UConn bookstore, for example.
 

the Q

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Unlikely, since, as I understand the concept, the kids do not have a right to wear the team uniforms in profit seeking ventures. The shoe is a part of the uniform. So a kid can talk about wearing adidas but on the court, he's wearing Nike, if that is the team shoe deal.

Yes it’s like when you see geno ads that just say hall of fame coach.

I recall one state or proposal exempted shoe deals and allowed players to do that.

Apparel and pouring rights are two of the biggest cash cows for universities that could be at risk.
 

oldude

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What about the billboards a few years ago which advertised UConn game tickets by showing the face of Molly Bent (and several other players on other billboards)? Would Molly and the others have to be paid by the university for the use of their pictures in advertisements?

Routine items such as team pictures raise the same issue, particularly if they are sold as consumer items. Certainly clothing with a player's name and/or uniform number on it would raise an issue if it were sold in the UConn bookstore, for example.
This is what NIL is all about. Big time college football sells 10’s of thousands of game day programs with player images and stories, and the players are not compensated. Most prospective NIL legislation would not allow athletes to profit when they are wearing team uniforms, which would preclude, programs, billboards, game highlights and so on.

But as I understand it, a top player like Paige would be free to do her own, separate shoe and apparel contract. Her endorsements ads would never have her in a UConn uniform. But there’s no reason that I know of that she couldn’t do a Nike commercial, wearing newly created PB brand clothing.

It’s a Brave New World.
 
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...Most prospective NIL legislation would not allow athletes to profit when they are wearing team uniforms, which would preclude, programs, billboards, game highlights and so on.

... a top player like Paige would be free to do her own, separate shoe and apparel contract. Her endorsements ads would never have her in a UConn uniform. ...
Does that mean that UConn would be free to sell #5 UConn basketball jerseys in the bookstore (with a sign over the rack showing Paige making a layup in a game) and make a profit on them, of which Paige would have no share? That hardly seems fair.
 
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CL82

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Yes it’s like when you see geno ads that just say hall of fame coach.
Yep
I recall one state or proposal exempted shoe deals and allowed players to do that.
Interesting. I hadn't seen that.
Apparel and pouring rights are two of the biggest cash cows for universities that could be at risk.
Doubtful in my opinion. The model isn't divide the universities' pie; it is expand the pie to give the players a slice.
 

CL82

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Does that mean that UConn would be free to sell #5 UConn basketball jerseys in the bookstore (with a sign over the rack showing Paige making a layup in a game) and make a profit on them, of which Paige would have no share? That hardly seems fair.
As I understand it, UConn can sell a #5 jersey but not use Paige's image without her permission, which raises an interesting question. If Paige can sell the rights to her image to third parties, why couldn't she sell those rights directly to the university? That seems both like a convenient solution and a huge avenue for abuse.
 

oldude

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Does that mean that UConn would be free to sell #5 UConn basketball jerseys in the bookstore (with a sign over the rack showing Paige making a layup in a game) and make a profit on them, of which Paige would have no share? That hardly seems fair.
I believe the answer to your question is yes. Some folks would argue that Paige gets free room and board from UConn for the right to market her uniform and likeness.

But here’s a curveball to consider. I would suspect that Nike, UConn’s shoe & apparel sponsor, will do everything they can to sign an endorsement deal with Paige. But there is a possibility that a competitor like PUMA, who is anxious to be a bigger player in the women’s market, and just signed a big endorsement deal with Stewie for her own brand, could swoop in and sign Paige.

So the upshot of such a deal would be that Paige wears Nike apparel whenever playing for UConn but does commercials for Puma shoes & sportswear.

Yet another interesting dilemma.
 

CL82

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FWIW:

1623432427026.png
 
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It's actually not that complicated. Players can already make money off of their name, image, or likeness. Does anyone know the law or code that specifically bans people from doing that? What existing law do these new laws repeal? This is just more of what American law and politics has become: performative over practical.
NCAA Division I Manual Article 2 Principles for Conduct of Intercollegiate Athletics

2.9 The Principle of Amateurism. [*] Student-athletes shall be amateurs in an intercollegiate sport, and their participation should be motivated primarily by education and by the physical, mental and social benefits to be derived. Student participation in intercollegiate athletics is an avocation, and student-athletes should be protected from exploitation by professional and commercial enterprises.
 

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