Connecticut Wakes Up On NIL Legislation

RockyMTblue2

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They have finally realized reliance on the NCAA could leave us at a tremendous disadvantage and legislative leadership is promising bipartisan passage of a bill within the week.


Geno weighs in: “Everyone’s under the impression that this NIL is definitely going to pass at the NCAA level, and it’s going to go into effect this summer,” UConn women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma said. “But there’s a possibility that it may not. There are still people talking that they’re not comfortable with it. So as all these other states move forward, if the NCAA votes yes, then great, we’d have the same advantages as every other state. But if the NCAA votes no, and we don’t have a law on the books, then we’re at a huge disadvantage for any of the athletes that go to UConn.”

And he points out potential advantages for CT athletes.

“We do have a unique situation here,” Auriemma said. “The tremendous following we enjoy, the national exposure we have, the amount of times that UConn pops up in media and social media, our players do benefit from that. There are opportunities that would exist here that would be significantly greater than they would be at any other place, or certainly most places. And the fact that in women’s basketball, the players are there for four years, they get to build on their brand, their popularity, I think this is significant and a potential game-changer for women’s sports and UConn in particular.”
 

CL82

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Can any legislators move that fast?
I’ve never really understood the push for states to an act law on this issue. The NCAA is a voluntary organization that has its own rules. If the NCAA does not allow a player to monetize their name, image, likeness without causing a lack of eligibility, why would it matter that there is a state law allowing it? A player who monetize these rights would be ineligible. Likewise, if the NCAA allows name image, likeness monetization, why do you need a state law that allows it?
 

oldude

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Can any legislators move that fast?
After Geno weighed in, this will be a relatively easy bill to pass for state legislators, and Governor Lamont will sign it into law as soon as it hits his desk. I just wonder if they’ll name it after someone like politicians sometimes do. “The Paige Bueckers Name, Image & Licensing Act” has a nice ring to it.

As I’ve commented before, it’s my hope that the actions of CT and all the states who have already passed NIL rules will collectively push the NCAA to finally get off their butt and pass comprehensive NIL legislation that would create uniform nationwide rules before the hodgepodge of state rules go into effect on July 1. The NCAA is scheduled to address the issue this month. Let’s hope they don’t punt.
 

oldude

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I’ve never really understood the push for states to an act law on this issue. The NCAA is a voluntary organization that has its own rules. If the NCAA does not allow a player to monetize their name, image, likeness without causing a lack of eligibility, why would it matter that there is a state law allowing it? A player who monetize these rights would be ineligible. Likewise, if the NCAA allows name image, likeness monetization, why do you need a state law that allows it?
You are correct, but as I point out in another post, hopefully the surge in state laws backing NIL for college athletes will finally push the NCAA to act this month when they meet to create uniform, nationwide legislation ahead of the implementation of various state laws on July 1.
 

CL82

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You are correct, but as I point out in another post, hopefully the surge in state laws backing NIL for college athletes will finally push the NCAA to act this month when they meet to create uniform, nationwide legislation ahead of the implementation of various state laws on July 1.
I wonder if the NCAA‘s response will be to defer the state law, which would create different rules for different institutions based on their locations.
 
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oldude

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There is one other aspect to state laws authorizing NIL if the NCAA and/or Congress fails to act to approve NIL on a nationwide basis. If the NCAA/Congress fails to act there will undoubtedly be one or more athletes in states that authorized NIL that will challenge the NCAA by signing promotional agreements for their NIL.

If the NCAA attempts to ban those athletes, they will end up in court. The last thing the NCAA wants is dozens of “Ed O’Bannon” type lawsuits challenging their absolute control over an athlete’s NIL, and this time around it won’t just be one individual battling the NCAA on his own. You can expect colleges, universities and state governments to bring the full weight of their institutions and resources to bear in support of their respective athletes against the hegemony of the NCAA.
 

oldude

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I wonder if the NCAA‘s response will be to defer the state Moore, which would create different rules for different institutions based on their locations.
I sure hope not. That would create an unmanageable, Balkanized mess around the country.
 

CL82

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There is one other aspect to state laws authorizing NIL if the NCAA and/or Congress fails to act to approve NIL on a nationwide basis. If the NCAA/Congress fails to act there will undoubtedly be one or more athletes in states that authorized NIL that will challenge the NCAA by signing promotional agreements for their NIL.

If the NCAA attempts to ban those athletes, they will end up in court. The last thing the NCAA wants is dozens of “Ed O’Bannon” type lawsuits challenging their absolute control over an athlete’s NIL, and this time around it won’t just be one individual battling the NCAA on his own. You can expect colleges, universities and state governments to bring the full weight of their institutions and resources to bear in support of their respective athletes against the hegemony of the NCAA.
Is it hegemony though? It’s a voluntary organization. I’d argue that it’s a voluntary organization that has long since ceased to be functional as a regulatory agency, but it is still a choice. Institutions can join or not.

I suspect that’s why the NCAA is hesitating so much. I think they suspect that given the “wrong answer” institutions might break away. I think it’s a legitimate concern.
 

oldude

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Is it hegemony though? It’s a voluntary organization. I’d argue that it’s a voluntary organization that has long since ceased to be functional as a regulatory agency, but it is still a choice. Institutions can join or not.

I suspect that’s why the NCAA is hesitating so much. I think they suspect that given the “wrong answer” institutions might break away. I think it’s a legitimate concern.
Interesting thought. To some degree, the NCAA has already lost control of big time college football. Presumably, the NCAA is canvassing all their member institutions and conferences as we speak to get their input in advance of the Board of Governors meeting on June 23.

The legislation proposed by the state of CT, which mirrors the proposed NCAA rule on NIL, threads the needle by making such authorization “subject to the rules of individual colleges and universities.” Presumably, that will permit any school or conference to establish their own rules.

Of course, each school and conference would have to weigh the impact on recruiting of going their own way on NIL. But I could see a conference like the Ivy League establishing their own set of rules on NIL.
 
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LwrcasefaN

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I get the intent of NIL and I support the INTENT. Having said that...I can see this as potentially having many unintended negative outcomes on recruiting, team chemistry and even pressure outside from entities with no affiliation with the actual school. I think some trial years are necessary before any permanency...that can't be undone.
 
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I get the intent of NIL and I support the INTENT. Having said that...I can see this as potentially having many unintended negative outcomes on recruiting, team chemistry and even pressure outside from entities with no affiliation with the actual school. I think some trial years are necessary before any permanency...that can't be undone.
No question about it.
 
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The UConn women are so well positioned to cash in on NIL. The highest profile WBB team in the country. So well covered by SNY in the biggest media market in the country. For some reason the women are way ahead of the men in social media presence which is where most of the potential income is. Then you take a super star like Paige or maybe Azzi and a multi year shoe or apparel deal in 7 figures wouldn’t shock me. I think NIL gives us a recruiting advantage over any school in the country.
 

oldude

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The UConn women are so well positioned to cash in on NIL. The highest profile WBB team in the country. So well covered by SNY in the biggest media market in the country. For some reason the women are way ahead of the men in social media presence which is where most of the potential income is. Then you take a super star like Paige or maybe Azzi and a multi year shoe or apparel deal in 7 figures wouldn’t shock me. I think NIL gives us a recruiting advantage over any school in the country.
One of the advantages WBB has over MBB is there are no “one and done” WBB players. Most are around for at least 4 years. Worst case, some players leave college after their junior year if they attain the WNBA minimum age requirement of 22. That being the case, WBB players like Paige have more time to develop their “brand” in college.
 
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This will only encourage women to stay in school the full 4 years which is to everyone's advantage, especially the athletes. If Morgan Tuck didn't have the degree and intelligence, where would she be right now?
 

oldude

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This will only encourage women to stay in school the full 4 years which is to everyone's advantage, especially the athletes. If Morgan Tuck didn't have the degree and intelligence, where would she be right now?
I can forsee a scenario where top college players like Boston, Brink or Paige can actually make more money in college than they can in the pros, considering the potential for greater exposure in college and the limited salaries available to WBB player in the pros.
 
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The UConn women are so well positioned to cash in on NIL. The highest profile WBB team in the country. So well covered by SNY in the biggest media market in the country. For some reason the women are way ahead of the men in social media presence which is where most of the potential income is. Then you take a super star like Paige or maybe Azzi and a multi year shoe or apparel deal in 7 figures wouldn’t shock me. I think NIL gives us a recruiting advantage over any school in the country.
for some reason? You mean because women are more into social media than men? The top 3 players imo in Men's cbb were Suggs Mitchell Juzang and I could not find anything social media of them maybe because they just want to concentrate on cbb crazy I know. I already know this will prob be the end for college sports, players will be too busy worrying about instagram followers and putting up content that they'll just put their sport 2nd. I remember Geno jokingly calling Paige "Kardashian" cause of what she was social media wise can only imagine if this passes how much more she will use
 

HuskylnSC

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I get the intent of NIL and I support the INTENT. Having said that...I can see this as potentially having many unintended negative outcomes on recruiting, team chemistry and even pressure outside from entities with no affiliation with the actual school. I think some trial years are necessary before any permanency...that can't be undone.
There is the issue of outside entities putting pressure on for social media purposes. But it would be another plus for players signing with UConn. There isn't a better place for a player to build a brand than here. I imagine we will have a new position open up to help the players with brand management.
 
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There is the issue of outside entities putting pressure on for social media purposes. But it would be another plus for players signing with UConn. There isn't a better place for a player to build a brand than here. I imagine we will have a new position open up to help the players with brand management.
agree with you completely, players are gonna care more about social media content than actually playing the sport, it's gonna be a disaster
 

the Q

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I’ve never really understood the push for states to an act law on this issue. The NCAA is a voluntary organization that has its own rules. If the NCAA does not allow a player to monetize their name, image, likeness without causing a lack of eligibility, why would it matter that there is a state law allowing it? A player who monetize these rights would be ineligible. Likewise, if the NCAA allows name image, likeness monetization, why do you need a state law that allows it?

Im with you.

I don’t get this at all
 

oldude

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Im with you.

I don’t get this at all
The one advantage of states advancing their own legislation is that it will push the NCAA to get off their asses and finally pass comprehensive legislation that would set a level playing field nationally on NIL. Up to now, the NCAA has mostly punted on NIL, trying to hand the issue off to Congress.

The various state laws are scheduled to go into effect on July 1. The NCAA has been working to craft their own comprehensive legislation with the Board of Governors scheduled to meet in 2 weeks on June 23 to hopefully finalize their rules.
 
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Emmert is a tough nut. He is giving in somewhat on this issue. This is turning into a real battle with many egos involved. Congress needs to move quickly because this could be the worst disaster in NCAA history if each state enacts their own law.
 
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I have always thought a good idea would be that athletes can get paid for their NIL while under scholarship and the money goes to the school to be held in an escrow account and paid to the athlete when they graduate.
 

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