OT: - Best Pizza in CT | Page 225 | The Boneyard

OT: Best Pizza in CT

August_West

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You leave the hot steel in the oven and use a wooden paddle to insert and remove pies?
yes. The steel (like a stone) needs to be preheated for quite a while before putting a pie on it. It is no different operation wise than using a stone, its just better.
 
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You leave the hot steel in the oven and use a wooden paddle to insert and remove pies?

Like August said. You use it the same way as a stone. It takes a good hour or two to preheat, but it retains SO much more heat. It's just better. They're pretty heavy though. I think mine are 30-40lbs each.

Another big time move is to get 2 pizza steels and use your oven. Put them on the two racks closest to the heat source so there's just a couple inches between them. Crank the oven high as it will go and them you get heat from both sides cooking your 'za. That's my go to move in the winter when I don't want to use my grill or pizza oven.

If you have time to preheat for an hour, the steels are even great for making cookies and other baked goods.
 

8893

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yes. The steel (like a stone) needs to be preheated for quite a while before putting a pie on it.

Like August said. You use it the same way as a stone. It takes a good hour or two to preheat, but it retains SO much more heat. It's just better. They're pretty heavy though. I think mine are 30-40lbs each.
It's the sous vide of pizza!

Great, I will start planning today for the pizza we are having on Saturday...
 

August_West

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It's the sous vide of pizza!

Great, I will start planning today for the pizza we are having on Saturday...


you dont preheat your stone?
 
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The original LizSue in Stamford blows away the Norwalk location. I'm still RIP Spinellis on Main Ave that's at least 10 years gone. The Uncle Leo's reincarnation up the street in Wilton doesn't cut it.

Stamford location is better. The problem is that the Liz Sue of today pales in comparison to the bagels made by the family who started it and named the store after their daughters. We might be on New York’s doorstep, but you can no longer find a quality bagel boiled and baked in Fairfield County (Adam Goldberg’s Pop Up Bagels at Marcia Selene Catering in Glenbrook are as close as they get).
 
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Of course. Not for hours though!

I figure if I'm willing to throw together a dough 24-48 hours in advance, I can heat up a stone for an hour too to get the whole experience. I just turn the oven on at the same time I start making my sauce, prepping my work surfaces with flour/semolina, all that. I'll usually make my sides while it's heating too.
 

8893

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I figure if I'm willing to throw together a dough 24-48 hours in advance, I can heat up a stone for an hour too to get the whole experience. I just turn the oven on at the same time I start making my sauce, prepping my work surfaces with flour/semolina, all that. I'll usually make my sides while it's heating too.
Yeah, I stopped making or even stretching my own dough several years ago. I can't improve measurably on the crusts we get from Pizza Gourmet, and if I want to, we are spoiled with such good local options for carry out that it's not worth it for me to try to improve on it.
 
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The best Apizza in CT is at my house. I have a wood fired oven and a dough recipe which has evolved over the years. I use a sourdough starter which I’ve now had for over 9 years. I ”acquired” it in the Bronx. If anyone wants to discuss pm me.

On the sourdough starter, I don’t think pizza should be made without it. It gives the pizza some much more flavor. I use a minimum 3 day cold ferment to bring out the flavor.

I’ve been talking to the owner of Bad Ass Bagles in Norwalk and she uses a sourdough starter for her bagels. Her bagels are awesome, as are her own cream cheeses.
The issue I've always had with sourdough is that I have no idea how much to add. Yeast is much more fool-proof. Is there a formula for how much starter you add?
 
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Stamford location is better. The problem is that the Liz Sue of today pales in comparison to the bagels made by the family who started it and named the store after their daughters. We might be on New York’s doorstep, but you can no longer find a quality bagel boiled and baked in Fairfield County (Adam Goldberg’s Pop Up Bagels at Marcia Selene Catering in Glenbrook are as close as they get).
Not true regarding Fairfield County; Bagel King in Fairfield makes Grade A bagels.
 

Hans Sprungfeld

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Things change, and so, "the what actually happened" version:

A dozen bagels Katz's and a good family brunch. Details withheld in deference to the thread's intended focus.

Dinner at Sally's last night under the tent, after discussion of my guests' preferences on a number of factors, guided us to Wooster Street.

They accepted my suggestion of 4 smalls: plain tomato sauce, white potato, Garden Special, and bacon w/mootz. All excellent, all loved, just enough leftover for them. My daughter was fully skeptical on the plain sauce pie, and it was her clear favorite. Sneaky disclosure: she's 'eating for two.'

In my role as dad, I ordered the potato and Garden with their usual onions. Daughter was happy to eat whatever I picked off, and I was happy to have their residual flavor.

With so many options (an interesting take on the old 'set & setting' trope), the pressure was on. A total winner.

I'm back to cooking today - Jewish brisket and matzo ball soup. They liked their sandwiches I suggested from Pastrami Queen & brought back to Central Park on Saturday after they'd been to The Met Museum. They might combine Katz's and Russ & Daughters today. He's a Lawrence, KS guy, and she got her tastes from traveling east, often for holidays & celebratory meals, from my side of her ancestry. They search out the cuisine wherever they go - Miami, Indianapolis, and counting.
 

8893

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My daughter was fully skeptical on the plain sauce pie, and it was her clear favorite. Sneaky disclosure: she's 'eating for two.'
Congrats, gramps! Great news!!!

As an aside, I am surprised that you would place their potato pie equal to the rest. It's easily my least-favorite New Haven apizza I've ever had. Granted, I don't like rosemary and I hate onions as a condiment; but one of my co-workers ordered it as part of an office pizza luncheon once and it was the only pizza from decades of office pizza luncheons that was left mostly uneaten. I put it in the office fridge and had to throw it out two days later because no one touched the leftovers.

But I guess there must be a reason they call it one of their specialty pies, so I shouldn't be shocked that it has its fans.
 
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Yeah, I stopped making or even stretching my own dough several years ago. I can't improve measurably on the crusts we get from Pizza Gourmet, and if I want to, we are spoiled with such good local options for carry out that it's not worth it for me to try to improve on it.
Same boat here -- I don't have the expertise or time to make dough that is better than what we can just buy. Saves so much time and energy not worth it to me. I spend a lot more time on sauce and ingredients where I feel like it matters.

Congrats, gramps! Great news!!!

As an aside, I am surprised that you would place their potato pie equal to the rest. It's easily my least-favorite New Haven apizza I've ever had. Granted, I don't like rosemary and I hate onions as a condiment; but one of my co-workers ordered it as part of an office pizza luncheon once and it was the only pizza from decades of office pizza luncheons that was left mostly uneaten. I put it in the office fridge and had to throw it out two days later because no one touched the leftovers.

But I guess there must be a reason they call it one of their specialty pies, so I shouldn't be shocked that it has its fans.
Sally's Potato is easily one of my favorites in New Haven :) -- I'm a potato lunatic, though. So not too surprising. Bufalina's special about a year back which used creme fraiche is definitely still in my top 5 pizzas consumed all time.
 

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8893

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So not too surprising. Bufalina's special about a year back which used creme fraiche is definitely still in my top 5 pizzas consumed all time.
We ate there on Saturday night. No special pies this weekend because they were rolling out the new early fall menu. The Funghi is back, and that was the favorite for my wife and the other couple we were with. My favorite was the new Uva, featuring seedless grapes, Melinda Mae cheese from the Mystic Cheese Co., thyme oil and sausage. The Maiale is back also and still excellent.
 

ClifSpliffy

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Things change, and so, "the what actually happened" version:

A dozen bagels Katz's and a good family brunch. Details withheld in deference to the thread's intended focus.

Dinner at Sally's last night under the tent, after discussion of my guests' preferences on a number of factors, guided us to Wooster Street.

They accepted my suggestion of 4 smalls: plain tomato sauce, white potato, Garden Special, and bacon w/mootz. All excellent, all loved, just enough leftover for them. My daughter was fully skeptical on the plain sauce pie, and it was her clear favorite. Sneaky disclosure: she's 'eating for two.'

In my role as dad, I ordered the potato and Garden with their usual onions. Daughter was happy to eat whatever I picked off, and I was happy to have their residual flavor.

With so many options (an interesting take on the old 'set & setting' trope), the pressure was on. A total winner.

I'm back to cooking today - Jewish brisket and matzo ball soup. They liked their sandwiches I suggested from Pastrami Queen & brought back to Central Park on Saturday after they'd been to The Met Museum. They might combine Katz's and Russ & Daughters today. He's a Lawrence, KS guy, and she got her tastes from traveling east, often for holidays & celebratory meals, from my side of her ancestry. They search out the cuisine wherever they go - Miami, Indianapolis, and counting.
'i'm back to cooking today - Jewish brisket...'
?????? wait, whut? someone is now running around circumsizing bulls?
talk aboot a tuff job. yikes!
 

Hans Sprungfeld

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'i'm back to cooking today - Jewish brisket...'
?????? wait, whut? someone is now running around circumsizing bulls?
talk aboot a tuff job. yikes!
Meant only that it's no rub & smoke job.

Perhaps "Jewish style" would have been a better way to put it. I was more focused on not being too colloquial and labeling my venture, "making Jew food," which is in that, "It's OK when I say it" category, but I'm selective about by audience. I guess that means we're family here...
 
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Meant only that it's no rub & smoke job.

Perhaps "Jewish style" would have been a better way to put it. I was more focused on not being too colloquial and labeling my venture, "making Jew food," which is in that, "It's OK when I say it" category, but I'm selective about by audience. I guess that means we're family here...
Perfect timing with Sukkot beginning tonight.
 

Hans Sprungfeld

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Congrats, gramps! Great news!!!

As an aside, I am surprised that you would place their potato pie equal to the rest. It's easily my least-favorite New Haven apizza I've ever had. Granted, I don't like rosemary and I hate onions as a condiment; but one of my co-workers ordered it as part of an office pizza luncheon once and it was the only pizza from decades of office pizza luncheons that was left mostly uneaten. I put it in the office fridge and had to throw it out two days later because no one touched the leftovers.

But I guess there must be a reason they call it one of their specialty pies, so I shouldn't be shocked that it has its fans.

Sally's Potato is easily one of my favorites in New Haven :) -- I'm a potato lunatic, though.
It came as a shocker to me when a woman at my picnic table offered me a slice on opening night of NH Docs Film festival. I accepted the offer to be polite and because I was hungry. The onion were super easy to remove, and that first time there was a greater crisp to the crust as the potato slices were at the start of browning.

Last night's was a notch below, but still a winning combo. Last month, I introduced a friend to mashed potato & bacon at BAR, and yet again that first, "Can this really work?" bite was a yes.

I loved witnessing my child go from thinking, "Really? I can't see it," to loving it.
 
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Got my Ooni Fyre up to 845 degrees Saturday. Burned the crap out of the first one. Next 3 came out great. Finally starting to get how to get that thing up and raging. It's not easy. It takes some time and reps and rhythm but the pies had nice crust, char and a soft airy doughy center.
 

ColchVEGAS

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Got my Ooni Fyre up to 845 degrees Saturday. Burned the crap out of the first one. Next 3 came out great. Finally starting to get how to get that thing up and raging. It's not easy. It takes some time and reps and rhythm but the pies had nice crust, char and a soft airy doughy center.

Agreed. I have the Ooni Pro and typically use hardwood lump coal. I aim for the deck to be 650-700 for when the first pizza goes in. I am not too concerned with the overall temp but usually 500-700 is the target I have found gives the best cooking experience without having to keep rotating without burning the crust too much.
 
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This sounds like it might be right up @8893 ’s alley…



-> Perhaps pizza traditionalists will revolt at a Pulled Pickle Pizza, a combination of pulled pork and dill pickle resting on Monterey Jack and cheddar, and dressed in BBQ sauce. Or the Lemon Boy, which has sliced lemon and smoked mozzarella mingling with olive oil and garlic, spiced with Aleppo Pepper and drizzled with honey. <-
 

8893

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This sounds like it might be right up @8893 ’s alley…



-> Perhaps pizza traditionalists will revolt at a Pulled Pickle Pizza, a combination of pulled pork and dill pickle resting on Monterey Jack and cheddar, and dressed in BBQ sauce. Or the Lemon Boy, which has sliced lemon and smoked mozzarella mingling with olive oil and garlic, spiced with Aleppo Pepper and drizzled with honey. <-
Would.
 

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