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Mr. French

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I’m 99.9% sure I had this at the start of March, I never was able to get tested during that time.

It took about 2.5 months for my breath to feel normal and I’m not sure it’s even “normal” now. I can’t point to anything specific as far as further effects but I know I haven’t really felt right since.

People talking about survival rate as a means to make it sound less serious infuriate me.

When you have it, you’ll feel the anxiety of not knowing whether you’re part of the 2% that will stop breathing, or whether you’ve infected your 18 month old. Or your pregnant fiancée.

Then tell me “survival rate is so high, it’s not that serious! We need to reopen!!”
 
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Good news if the death rate is going down, but have you read about the effects of the illness on many of those who get it? There is an alarming number of people who have had the illness and its attendant symptoms, who then tested negatively, but for months after, have experienced digestive problems, severe headaches, and persistent weakness and they are not all elderly.

Medical experts have opined that the virus alters body organs and their functions for a long period afterwards, and possibly permanently.

Yes, school opening is a risk-benefit issue. No easy solutions. Hopefully, an effective vaccine or treatment.

Yes, I’ve read about the effects, talked to people who have had it, and talked to a good friend who is treating patients. The virus is no joke. Luckily in my experience many people don’t have these effects, but many also do. It’s not something to be taken lightly. I’m not saying that because the survival rate is now estimated to be over 99.5% across all age groups that we should just quickly get back to normal. Just trying to say that hopefully there is a silver lining in that even though the disease has its effects on people it’s nowhere near as deadly as we originally thought. Still have to take it seriously though, not denying that.
 

pj

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Good news if the death rate is going down, but have you read about the effects of the illness on many of those who get it? There is an alarming number of people who have had the illness and its attendant symptoms, who then tested negatively, but for months after, have experienced digestive problems, severe headaches, and persistent weakness and they are not all elderly.

Medical experts have opined that the virus alters body organs and their functions for a long period afterwards, and possibly permanently.

Yes, school opening is a risk-benefit issue. No easy solutions. Hopefully, an effective vaccine or treatment.

Yes, the virus can establish persistent systemic infection with long-term effects including immune suppression. In the end, we will have to develop inexpensive therapies that relieve these effects. Fortunately we know how to make such things. Just as anti-HIV drugs have turned a once deadly infection into something people can live with, so anti-coronaviral drugs will relieve the persistent effects of COVID-19.

It would be nice if we could prevent people from getting the disease, but even a vaccine doesn't achieve that. A vaccine merely helps the immune system keep the viral load down so that an infection is less noticeable. This virus spreads too easily to stop it from spreading to nearly everyone. School closings don't prevent it from spreading. So they are not really relevant to the medical issues.
 

pj

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I’m 99.9% sure I had this at the start of March, I never was able to get tested during that time.

It took about 2.5 months for my breath to feel normal and I’m not sure it’s even “normal” now. I can’t point to anything specific as far as further effects but I know I haven’t really felt right since.

People talking about survival rate as a means to make it sound less serious infuriate me.

When you have it, you’ll feel the anxiety of not knowing whether you’re part of the 2% that will stop breathing, or whether you’ve infected your 18 month old. Or your pregnant fiancée.

Then tell me “survival rate is so high, it’s not that serious! We need to reopen!!”

Somewhat similar to my experience, I had it late January to early March, my 5 year old brought it home from kindergarten presumably from his Italian classmates.

However, mine was less severe, no loss of breath that I noticed, just a cough that would never go away.

It's appropriate to be outraged that the NIH and Chinese were doing gain-of-function engineering on coronaviruses in Wuhan. It's senseless to think we should shut down all schooling and other life activities. We need to live our lives and treat a medical issue with medicine.
 
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I recognize the 2 week UConn on campus resident quorentine has been communicated. The news is that other colleges have come up with a better approach using the two test approached I discussed. These schools plan to get state approval and release their plans soon.

UConn is bringing dorm resident back two weeks early to allow for required coronavirus testing, required education on new campus safety policy/procedures/practices in relation to Covid and possible quarantine periods if needed based on test results.

The thought that each school may have a different reopening plan is not breaking news. I’m not sure how anything can be characterized as a “better approach” til it actually happens and the results are reviewed. No actionable plan is written in stone and needs to evolve based on individual campus demographics/challenges/experiences.
 
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Dream Jobbed 2.0

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My wife is a teacher at a HS. The current game plan is to have teachers wipe down the class rooms between classes. Also, all students must wear a mask throughout the day.

Try telling a 1st grader to keep the mask on all day.

Parents don't want the kids home. And they will be the first to btch and moan when the schools are not properly able to handle this lack of social distancing and mask requirment.
I’m a teacher and I have no fear about kids keeping the mask on in normal circumstances but what about when a kid gets upset and rips it off and starts spitting. Kids with autism? Type of mask you have will also just be another status symbol.
 
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Lol this is a true narcissist at work. Long time lurker here. Stick to Your extremely basic understanding of policy and academic bureaucracy and nothing else. As an MD, I can tell you there is no such thing as “best practice” here. It’s a nonsensical term to begin with, but especially so here. This is uncharted territory. Your narcissistic and elitist views have no application here, and if the university were to heed your advice over that of the experts, they would be making a huge mistake. There may be a “common practice,” but the “Best practice” is to be determined.
Maybe you should have continued to be a lurker. No need to attack chief00.
 
C

Chief00

Instead of hijacking threads turning them into nonsense CV-19 debates, let's just start a nonsense thread!

Covid-19 is very much a factor in our MBB season. It’s the elephant in the room. How colleges are administratively handling directly impacts the sport. Down the road, when school is remote after Thanksgiving at UConn, do we allow games with spectators? So this season, mentioning Covid19 isn’t hijacking a thread, its intermingled with our ability to practice, play and watch games.
 
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C

Chief00

UConn is bringing dorm resident back two weeks early to allow for required coronavirus testing, required education on new campus safety policy/procedures/practices in relation to Covid and possible quarantine periods if needed based on test results.

The thought that each school may have a different reopening plan is not breaking news. I’m not sure how anything can be characterized as a “better approach” til it actually happens and the results are reviewed. No actionable plan is written in stone and needs to evolve based on individual campus demographics/challenges/experiences.
You miss the key point, require the student to test with negative result BEFORE arriving on campus.
This is so basic and filled with logical sense. Once you get a positive kid on campus - the infections start - despite the quarantine you are pretending is happening.
 
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Chief, please stick to basketball commentary. That creates more than enough conversation here. You cant possibly fit in being an expert on contagious diseases on top of all the recruiting that you do for the school. Plus I assume you have "real" job too. Not sure where you get the time to sleep.

But, but, but, isn't everybody on the Boneyard an expert? :rolleyes:
Chief'n doesn't allow time for sleep but Chief does what he has to do to keep the grind going.
 

August_West

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Chief getting Covid would be kismet. ( but yet I still don’t wish on him)
 
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Good news if the death rate is going down, but have you read about the effects of the illness on many of those who get it? There is an alarming number of people who have had the illness and its attendant symptoms, who then tested negatively, but for months after, have experienced digestive problems, severe headaches, and persistent weakness and they are not all elderly.

Medical experts have opined that the virus alters body organs and their functions for a long period afterwards, and possibly permanently.

Yes, school opening is a risk-benefit issue. No easy solutions. Hopefully, an effective vaccine or treatment.

There are many kinds of infections that can permanently alter the body. Lyme is one. Cat Scratch disease is another. For most people, not a problem. For a huge chunk of Lyme contractors, huge problem. Covid causes the same kind of blood vessel damage and disease that the bacteria above do.
 
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The professors (older staff) are the people who need to take precautions and do everything possible to isolate themselves from the students. They are the people who are at risk. The students will be fine. 99.9% of the students will have no issues from the virus.
 
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You miss the key point, require the student to test with negative result BEFORE arriving on campus.
This is so basic and filled with logical sense. Once you get a positive kid on campus - the infections start - despite the quarantine you are pretending is happening.

Okay, so a university mandates that each arriving residence hall student must have a documented negative Covid-19 PCR test (most accurate) within 72 hours prior to arrival on campus. Sally Sorority has her test done, receives her results from her MD and it shows that she tested negative so she is all set to check in on campus Monday. Saturday night she goes out barhopping with the rest of her friends for a farewell celebration. Sally being Sally when she drinks, ends up swapping spit w/ a number of "friends" (some who inevitably are pre-symptomatic/asymptomatic).

Sally arrives on campus, provides her negative test results, gets her residence hall keycard and everyone is happy till 4 days later Sally feels like crap when walking back from class, goes to the on-campus health center and tests Covid positive and the on-campus/off-campus contact tracing begins.

The point is requiring a negative test prior to arrival on campus may weed out a few Covid+ kids (and may save a few $$) but is also providing the same false sense of security that testing kids upon arrival on campus and quarantining them if necessary does. There is no right or wrong/better or worse approach. Its an exercise in risk reduction and liability CYA.
 
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I don't agree with what CTBballfan243 is saying.

As a high school teacher at a school with 2,000+ students I chuckled at Gov. Lamont's guidelines. I will go as far as to say that i'll be shocked if we're in school in September.

There's just too much risk and not enough reward. So many ricochet shots from this, far reaching, and some will take years to be evident.
 

August_West

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I don't agree with what CTBballfan243 is saying.

As a high school teacher at a school with 2,000+ students I chuckled at Gov. Lamont's guidelines. I will go as far as to say that i'll be shocked if we're in school in September.

There's just too much risk and not enough reward. So many ricochet shots from this, far reaching, and some will take years to be evident.


I mean they had to have a plan early. It doesnt seem workable. They also have to have contingenices. I understand that.

I would be shocked to see classes in session in September. Especially elementary.
 

Fairfield_1st

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The point is requiring a negative test prior to arrival on campus may weed out a few Covid+ kids (and may save a few $$) but is also providing the same false sense of security that testing kids upon arrival on campus and quarantining them if necessary does.
I agree that your story about Sally could easily happen, but it's still better to have known positive tests stay home than going to the campus and then finding out. It's all about reducing the spread. Chief did indicate another test, maybe in 2 weeks, would identify Sally and anyone else she may have swapped spit with. I think the method makes sense. Maybe that 2nd test is in the first week to limit Sally's impact or even upon arrival, so 2 tests within a week's time.
Throwing a monkey wrench into any plan is the validity of the testing. Here's hoping whatever UConn does it works out well.
 
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With all the plans proposed and likely to be adopted, is there a "tipping point" built into the plan? I mean if the Covid 19 cases for the students keep seeing a rise, is there a ratio or percentage of cases for the student body, that triggers a shutdown of the university?

Has public health come up with a formula or algorithm when to "close the shop?" Or, is it just a decision on a case by case basis?

Will a "flattening of the curve," however that is determined, going to mean a reopening if there is a closing?

It will be most unfortunate if one specialty school has virtually no cases, and another specialty school has a lot.
 
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I mean they had to have a plan early. It doesnt seem workable. They also have to have contingenices. I understand that.

I would be shocked to see classes in session in September. Especially elementary.

The real hot button issue is that everyone seems to be in agreement across the board that distance learning is not effective for elementary and younger middle school students - that's why there's pressure from all sides to get us all back in the classroom. When it comes to high school education, if you can't make distance learning work for you - you stink at teaching.

I'm not a try-hard like some of my colleagues with videos and all kinds of content every day - along with demanding these kids show up to a Google Meet 4x a week, but I've learned that less is more. It's all about the functionality of what you give the kids. I've heard of colleagues just slapping down a 230 page PDF and saying, first 3 chapters due tomorrow. It is the simplest of simple adjustments, but I chop them all down into small 2-3 chapter size PDFs and that had a remarkable effect on anxiety and productivity.

The bugaboo in all of this is that parents need to get back to work. That's the wrench into everything. The reality of that just suuuuuuuuuucks for everyone involved. My wife and I don't have kids at home, and have been working remotely for 3 and a half months and it's been a godsend to be honest. I've saved a ridiculous amount of money on gas, I still can't get over how much extra cash I've had.

I don't know what the answer is. I truly feel for the parents who are just absolutely screwed if distance learning continues. I just think that's unfortunately the best move we have. All it takes is one sick kid, maybe not even sick! One asymptomatic kid, adult, cafeteria worker, delivery man - to bring down an entire school.

I'll do whatever I'm asked to do, but sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeesh.. This fall is going to be a wild one.
 
C

Chief00

Okay, so a university mandates that each arriving residence hall student must have a documented negative Covid-19 PCR test (most accurate) within 72 hours prior to arrival on campus. Sally Sorority has her test done, receives her results from her MD and it shows that she tested negative so she is all set to check in on campus Monday. Saturday night she goes out barhopping with the rest of her friends for a farewell celebration. Sally being Sally when she drinks, ends up swapping spit w/ a number of "friends" (some who inevitably are pre-symptomatic/asymptomatic).

Sally arrives on campus, provides her negative test results, gets her residence hall keycard and everyone is happy till 4 days later Sally feels like crap when walking back from class, goes to the on-campus health center and tests Covid positive and the on-campus/off-campus contact tracing begins.

The point is requiring a negative test prior to arrival on campus may weed out a few Covid+ kids (and may save a few $$) but is also providing the same false sense of security that testing kids upon arrival on campus and quarantining them if necessary does. There is no right or wrong/better or worse approach. Its an exercise in risk reduction and liability CYA.
You conveniently leave out the second test when they get to campus - which closes the risk window further. But, of course life is not without some risks.
What on Earth do you think Sally is going to do during this brilliant two week quarantine- sitting in her non - air conditioned room for two weeks in August? When was the last time you were a student?
 
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The real hot button issue is that everyone seems to be in agreement across the board that distance learning is not effective for elementary and younger middle school students - that's why there's pressure from all sides to get us all back in the classroom. When it comes to high school education, if you can't make distance learning work for you - you stink at teaching.

I think that very much depends on your student population
 

Wordbomar

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I agree with 95% of what you said @M.S.G.

However, even at the high school levels in low income communities, it has been difficult for some to get access to the needed materials. Distance learning is not good (we all know this), but it seems like we just asking for trouble sending the kids back to school. The flu rages during the winter months, now imagine how Covid will be considering it is by all accounts more contagious. Not many good answers.
 

August_West

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The bugaboo in all of this is that parents need to get back to work. That's the wrench into everything.


That IS the wrench in everything.

I live with a K teacher. she busted her butt to create great content every week. No one ( I mean like 15% of people, because as Im sure you know thats measurable) actually watched the content after the first 3 weeks of online learning. and that was with MOST parents at home.

HS should be able to pull it off...... Early elementary, I dont see how. Kids that age are germ factories and dont even really understand how or why they need a mask. Plus at that age socialization is such a huge component of early childhood education. How that gets balanced I cant figure out. And no one else can. Its a troubling time.
 
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I agree with 95% of what you said @M.S.G.

However, even at the high school levels in low income communities, it has been difficult for some to get access to the needed materials. Distance learning is not good (we all know this), but it seems like we just asking for trouble sending the kids back to school. The flu rages during the winter months, now imagine how Covid will be considering it is by all accounts more contagious. Not many good answers.

We made Chromebooks available to kids, they could come to school and pick one up. Also I believe some broadband companies were said to be offering free hot spots to homes that didn't already have internet access. My school is about 65/35 urban/low income and we pulled it off, I guess? I only know what I saw and what I got out of it. I don't know if it's measurable to tell how well it truly worked across the board.
 
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That IS the wrench in everything.

I live with a K teacher. she busted her butt to create great content every week. No one ( I mean like 15% of people, because as Im sure you know thats measurable) actually watched the content after the first 3 weeks of online learning. and that was with MOST parents at home.

HS should be able to pull it off...... Early elementary, I dont see how. Kids that age are germ factories and dont even really understand how or why they need a mask. Plus at that age socialization is such a huge component of early childhood education. How that gets balanced I cant figure out. And no one else can. Its a troubling time.

That's the damn shame of it all. How quickly PARENTS even checked out. I know it's not their job, but damn that is so ridiculous! I do appreciate the trickle down of respect that teachers finally might be able to get.. Yeah I can't even say that with a straight face!
 
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