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Airplane etiquette

Chin Diesel

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We'll see how this plays out.

FAA is still basically a shill for major airlines when it comes to policy.

I'm about 6' tall and rarely have issues with leg room (seat pitch). You really need to go in to the small regional jets for me to be bumping knees on seats in front of me. And on those fights I do whatever I can for exit row seats or paying to move up to more leg room. Seat width is a bigger deal for me. Especially when they start putting trays or video screens in the arm rest.

Congress could make FAA boost size of seats, legroom on airplanes
 
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We'll see how this plays out.

FAA is still basically a shill for major airlines when it comes to policy.

I'm about 6' tall and rarely have issues with leg room (seat pitch). You really need to go in to the small regional jets for me to be bumping knees on seats in front of me. And on those fights I do whatever I can for exit row seats or paying to move up to more leg room. Seat width is a bigger deal for me. Especially when they start putting trays or video screens in the arm rest.

Congress could make FAA boost size of seats, legroom on airplanes

One question I have always been curious about is if the airplane manufactures and/or airlines have tested to see how much longer it takes a plan to be fully evacuated in an emergency with more passengers and narrower rows with the same number of exists as in the past. I was told by an engineer once in the '90's that this safety issues was a reason why more seats could not be crammed into a plane.
 

Chin Diesel

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One question I have always been curious about is if the airplane manufactures and/or airlines have tested to see how much longer it takes a plan to be fully evacuated in an emergency with more passengers and narrower rows with the same number of exists as in the past. I was told by an engineer once in the '90's that this safety issues was a reason why more seats could not be crammed into a plane.
There are regulations in place regarding egress in an emergency. Airlines will tell you they are in compliance with all laws, which is true.

The idea of increasing standards for emergency exiting has been discussed as a back door regulation to make seats and aisles bigger.
 
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One question I have always been curious about is if the airplane manufactures and/or airlines have tested to see how much longer it takes a plan to be fully evacuated in an emergency with more passengers and narrower rows with the same number of exists as in the past. I was told by an engineer once in the '90's that this safety issues was a reason why more seats could not be crammed into a plane.
One of my biggest pet peeves is how we deboard a plane. It is the most inefficient process ever. There should be exits in the front and back, first and foremost. No reason there couldn't be.
 

polycom

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One of my biggest pet peeves is how we deboard a plane. It is the most inefficient process ever. There should be exits in the front and back, first and foremost. No reason there couldn't be.
There are exits in the front and the back it's that airports only have 1 jet bridge that is the issue. Airports are cheap and only use 1 jet bridge...
 
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That's fine. Throw a flight of stairs on wheels on the back one.
I remember pre 9/11 de-boarding the old Delta Shuttle 727's from the rear ramp at LaGuardia right onto the tarmac and then back into the terminal.

In recent times, I have only seen two jet bridges used on 747's (I believe all US airlines have stopped using them) and A-380's.
 
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polycom

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I remember pre 9/11 de-boarding the old Delta Shuttle 727's from the rear ramp at LaGuardia right onto the tarmac and then back into the terminal.

In recent timed, I have only seen two jet bridges used on 747's (I believe all US airlines have stopped using them) and A-380's.
This is correct they use 2 jet bridges for international boarding. Delta one cabin and then everyone else.
 

Husky25

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In my experience, most issues deplaning begin and end with the passengers sitting midcabin who feel a need to be the first ones off the plane.
 

Chin Diesel

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I think I've used a double entrance on an A-330 or 777 as well. I know I've used them and it wasn't a 747 or 380.

As for the back stairs, yes, they could do it with the rolling steps but that's another casualty of 9/11. Minimal passenger access to the tarmac. Only the smallest of commuter planes do that nowadays.

And yes, agree that deplaning is a clusterfoul.
 
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In my experience, most issues deplaning begin and end with the passengers sitting midcabin who feel a need to be the first ones off the plane.
Agree. Unless I have a very tight connection or a meeting that I need to get to right away (I usually fly out the day before for work nowadays due to all of the delays), I just catch-up on e-mails and the news and wait for everyone else to leave.
 

Husky25

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Deplaning got 100x worse when airlines started charging for checked baggage. You incentive people to carry on more, and taking bags out of overhead is the clog now.
That's a cop out. Nine times out of ten, there is an announcement that the plane is full, space in the bulkhead is limited, and gate check is available at no charge. The experienced traveler knows this. For the inexperienced traveler, there are 700 articles on airline secrets from why not to order airplane coffee to using the lavatories. This is never one of them.

Once the plane gets to the gate and the captain turns off the fasten seat belt sign, 70% of the passengers stand up, as if they are Pavlov's dog at dinnertime. No one is even manning the jetway yet, and people are climbing over one another.

Let's say you do get your bag. There is no other choice than to sit back down, only now with a 45 linear inch suitcase on your lap that bothers the seatback in front of you, with the slightest shift. Then it takes that much more time for you to awkwardly stand back up, delaying the rest of the passengers in the process.

Stay seated, zipper into the isle like you learned in 1st grade, and get off the plane.
 

HuskyHawk

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Deplaning got 100x worse when airlines started charging for checked baggage. You incentive people to carry on more, and taking bags out of overhead is the clog now.
Bingo. This is the culprit. I say, free checked bag, charge for any large carry-on. I just got back from New Orleans and it was absurd how much stuff people tried to carry on. Bags stashed far away from where people sit by necessity and it takes many people a long time to get those bags down from the overhead.

As for the dual exits, this was the norm at Bradley for years. It was one of the last airports to implement jet bridges. I remember having to go down the stairs and outside in the snow, rain, cold whatever. Miserable.

And @Husky25 I'm one of the people who stand. I don't ever bring a roll on bag, just a small backpack I then put on my seat. I don't see others pulling down larger bags mid-plane. One thing I do while standing in the middle is help distribute bags to people in front of me, when they are stored above my seat. That speeds things up.
 

Husky25

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And @Husky25 I'm one of the people who stand. I don't ever bring a roll on bag, just a small backpack I then put on my seat. I don't see others pulling down larger bags mid-plane. One thing I do while standing in the middle is help distribute bags to people in front of me, when they are stored above my seat. That speeds things up.
All that this amounts to is 1) you are part of the 30% and/or 2) we've never been on the same flight.
 
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This all brings flashbacks to my 28 years of a lot of flying that ended 3 years ago. It did change after 9/11 but I watched the second jet fly into wtc with my own 2 eyes and would have seen the first if my back wasn't to the window. So I gulp and accept the security measures however inefficient.

So for the frequents I will spin a little positivity. I and I bet you have flown free and stayed free in a lot of nice places if you play the points and card game. Took a family of 4 from Europe to Hawaii and sunny and ski destinations in between over the years, mostly on American and Hyatt but other programs too. So think about that in a "squeeze".
 

Chin Diesel

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So, FAA will have to come up with seat pitch and width standards, which as of today are undefined. I fully expect this to be a hodge podge set of regulations for existing planes, newly built planes, commuter jets, prop planes, transcontinental and intercontinental flights. Never mind US flagged carriers vice overseas flagged carriers.

Senate approves bill that would regulate airline seat sizes
 
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