Tennessee vs. Stanford -- for whom to root?

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#28
It is difficult to root at all under any circumstances for Tenn for anyone reading their site and the same old accusations from 2006..... "you know what you did" uttered by Pat Summit..... and descriptive nastiness of Geno etc..... Funny that when I meet Tenn fans at games they are for the most part great.... but their fan online site is a snake pit....
 
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#29
Until geno passes Tara I'll take Tennessee any day over stanford. I've never liked tara anyway but seriously, we haven't played Tennessee in 11 years I hate muffet and notre dame more then I ever hated Tennessee and I haaaaaaated Tennessee.
 

Bama fan

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#36
:D I suspect that my veiled reference to the Orange Order of Northern Ireland Protestants was lost on many.
Irish Catholics refer disparagingly to "King Billy" , aka William III of Orange. His ascendancy to the throne, along with Mary II, marked the bitter end of the struggle between the Stuart monarchs and the growing Protestant movement in England. And, of course, it was devastating to Irish catholics , many of whom were put to death, deported, and had their property seized. Irish Catholics in Ireland have no love for the colour orange.
 

OneTrickPony

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#39
Irish Catholics refer disparagingly to "King Billy" , aka William III of Orange. His ascendancy to the throne, along with Mary II, marked the bitter end of the struggle between the Stuart monarchs and the growing Protestant movement in England. And, of course, it was devastating to Irish catholics , many of whom were put to death, deported, and had their property seized. Irish Catholics in Ireland have no love for the colour orange.
Take a look at the Irish National Flag...

1544197211472.png
 

Bama fan

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#41
Take a look at the Irish National Flag...

View attachment 37205
And your point is what? In the Irish Republic, formed after the rebellion which led to the Irish Free State, the leaders recognized that the alliance of catholics and protestants was necessary for the progress of the nation. The flag represents that alliance. But the Irish Catholic population living in Northern Ireland remains highly critical of the Orange Order. The "Troubles", unfortunately, are far from over as there is lingering distrust on both sides. :(
 

DefenseBB

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#42
Irish Catholics refer disparagingly to "King Billy" , aka William III of Orange. His ascendancy to the throne, along with Mary II, marked the bitter end of the struggle between the Stuart monarchs and the growing Protestant movement in England. And, of course, it was devastating to Irish catholics , many of whom were put to death, deported, and had their property seized. Irish Catholics in Ireland have no love for the colour orange.
Awesome history lesson that was only slighted by not mentioning the College of William and Mary (second oldest higher education school behind Harvard and educator of 3 presidents-Jefferson, Monroe, Tyler) was founded by his majesty in 1693.
 

Bama fan

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#47
Awesome history lesson that was only slighted by not mentioning the College of William and Mary (second oldest higher education school behind Harvard and educator of 3 presidents-Jefferson, Monroe, Tyler) was founded by his majesty in 1693.
No slight to the College of William and Mary intended. Their majesties did indeed found that institution of higher learning. Unfortunately for the Catholic population of Ireland, their royal majesties used money taken from them to fund their beneficence! And that is no slight to the school, but rather to "Dutch Billy".
 

OneTrickPony

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#49
And your point is what? In the Irish Republic, formed after the rebellion which led to the Irish Free State, the leaders recognized that the alliance of catholics and protestants was necessary for the progress of the nation. The flag represents that alliance. But the Irish Catholic population living in Northern Ireland remains highly critical of the Orange Order. The "Troubles", unfortunately, are far from over as there is lingering distrust on both sides. :(
Northern Ireland is not the Irish Republic. You can still have a fistfight in Glasgow by wearing green or orange anytime the Celtics play the Rangers.

William III actually pushed to have the Toleration Act of 1689 extended to Roman Catholics.

The historian Kenneth Pearl sees the Act of Toleration as "in many ways a compromise bill. To get nonconformists' (Protestants who were not members of the Church of England) support in the crucial months of 1688". Both the Whig and Tory parties that had rallied around William and Mary had promised nonconformists that such an act would be enacted if the revolution succeeded. James II had himself issued an act of toleration, but the nonconformists believed their future would be more secure if the Sovereign was not a Roman Catholic.

Roman Catholics were no longer hunted down after the passage of the Act, and William III was seen as an ally personally. The Orange on the Celtic Flag is a tip of the hat to the Dutchman that curbed the worst tendencies of the English Anglicans.
 
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