O.T. Anyone having problems with Dorian?



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In CT, they broke into the news last night with Emergency Weather Warning re tornado activity. There was quite a focus on Storrs and the campus at one point. But nothing touched down.
 

Biff

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In CT, they broke into the news last night with Emergency Weather Warning re tornado activity. There was quite a focus on Storrs and the campus at one point. But nothing touched down.
That weather front had nothing to do with Dorian.
 
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In CT, they broke into the news last night with Emergency Weather Warning re tornado activity. There was quite a focus on Storrs and the campus at one point. But nothing touched down.
People in the rest of the country laugh at our "severe" weather. Connecticut has the lowest risk of natural disasters.
 

triaddukefan

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Cloudy all day, windy, but just a drizzle of rain here in central NC. Its gonna be a loooooooong night for the eastern part of the state. Have a friend in the North Charleston area..... I was questioning her decision not to evacuate....but besides a few down tree limbs, some rain.. things weren't nearly as bad as they could have been.



We are hunkered down and waiting here in Alabama. Feds are revising maps as we speak! But really, I hope everyone is safe along the Atlantic coast.
Glad that you are safe and dry down in Alabama..... I was worried about yall.
 
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TRIAD: have a number of relatives and friends in the Carolinas; all have reported in right in line with your experience....."things not nearly as bad" as anticipated, at least up to this point. Stay well and safe, Yarders.
 
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People in the rest of the country laugh at our "severe" weather. Connecticut has the lowest risk of natural disasters.
Tell that to the old folks in the Mad River or Naugatuck River Valleys---or along the Sound Coast disasters or the Winter disasters of being with out power and heat. Ct ain't a paradise of great weather Or the 20th Century mini- ice age disaster or the 88 storm of the centuries. Or the winter I departed Ct with 20 plus inch storms over and over. I'll take South Carolina.
 
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We all know what caused Dorian .... at least that's what some chuckle heads think.
I was wondering if it wasn't the front was it the back? We all know it was the warm water thrown out the back door of those jets going to the V.I."s
 

RockyMTblue2

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Tell that to the old folks in the Mad River or Naugatuck River Valleys---or along the Sound Coast disasters or the Winter disasters of being with out power and heat. Ct ain't a paradise of great weather Or the 20th Century mini- ice age disaster or the 88 storm of the centuries. Or the winter I departed Ct with 20 plus inch storms over and over. I'll take South Carolina.
It was the 19th century mini-ice age @Bellemare. The 20th century mini-ice age, sagely predicted by the environmental brigade based on flourocarbon emissions never happened, your deodorant can etc, never happened. I suspect that's your point. The early 19th century one was real and just may be making a new visit based on sunspot inactivity. The first 8 months of 2019 in MT is the 4th coldest on record. The real temperature data for the last 20 years supports that possibility, but never let truth get in the way of an agenda.

Oops, sorry.
 

RockyMTblue2

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When I heard yesterday that 400 +/- souls were trapped on one of the out islands of the Hatteras area I got real mad. Has there ever been a hurricane that moved this slow and about which we knew the expected storm surge to the micro-millimeter!!!! They had days to get the heck out of there -days. So now rescue personnel in great numbers have to put themselves in extreme danger to rescue your dumb asses!!!! And, by the way, in all probability these are rich, stupid people they have to save. Not talking New Orleans here folks. "Honey the helicopter is here. But I haven't finished my martini Luv. By the way do you think we could ask them to fly over the yacht mooring so we can check on "Storm Chaser" Luv."

Sorta the opposite of Sam Kinison's stand-up riff on World Hunger.
 
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I missed it altogether due to some good timing. I left South Florida on Friday to visit family for Labor in CT. Was on the first plane that landed in Ft. Lauderdale when it reopened. All we had was street flooding and that was caused more by the King tides, not the storm.
 
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Tell that to the old folks in the Mad River or Naugatuck River Valleys---or along the Sound Coast disasters or the Winter disasters of being with out power and heat. Ct ain't a paradise of great weather Or the 20th Century mini- ice age disaster or the 88 storm of the centuries. Or the winter I departed Ct with 20 plus inch storms over and over. I'll take South Carolina.
The insurance companies who assess risk disagree. Connecticut doesn't have to deal with hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, temperature extremes, high winds, damaging hail, floods, or severe ice storms. None of these things are issues for Connecticut. It helps to have a small state with a climate moderated by the Atlantic Ocean.
 
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Here is south central coastal Florida we got wind and rain and a bunch of palm fronds that would have eventually come down, anyway. We're treating this as a dress rehearsal for the next one. Weather Underground says there's one off the coast of Africa with a strong chance of development, though no one knows where it'll track. If not that one, we've still got a couple of months to go.
 

huskeynut

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Central Florida got a few rain bands and some light winds. Our community was prepared. CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) was put on alert but not needed. No loss of power, not even a flicker. A lot of closings for two days including all the amenities. Glad we didn't get a lot of rain. A lot of rain brings out the water moccasins/ cotton mouths. Our community has 20 some ponds and a large lake plus conservation areas and wetlands. High water table brings those vipers out.

Like Tomcat said - dress rehearsal for what's coming next.
 

RockyMTblue2

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The insurance companies who assess risk disagree. Connecticut doesn't have to deal with hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, temperature extremes, high winds, damaging hail, floods, or severe ice storms. None of these things are issues for Connecticut. It helps to have a small state with a climate moderated by the Atlantic Ocean.
And buffered by Long Island.
 

RockyMTblue2

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Tell that to the old folks in the Mad River or Naugatuck River Valleys---or along the Sound Coast disasters or the Winter disasters of being with out power and heat. Ct ain't a paradise of great weather Or the 20th Century mini- ice age disaster or the 88 storm of the centuries. Or the winter I departed Ct with 20 plus inch storms over and over. I'll take South Carolina.
You are right of course about the Mad and Naugatuck river valleys. BUT, why oh why do people keep rebuilding in the flood plain (as in right on) those rivers. Why do Californians keep building in predictably no-way-out tinderbox hills, etc etc etc.
 

RockyMTblue2

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My birthplace now being buffeted by Dorian, which they now call a cyclone.
 

JRRRJ

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People in the rest of the country laugh at our "severe" weather. Connecticut has the lowest risk of natural disasters.
That's based on recent history. In the '50s CT was whacked by a number of serious hurricanes. Carol, in particular took a path right up the Connecticut River. When we drove into E Hartford the day after, Main St was still a foot deep in water. She's why the levees are so high now. There's no reason why a sequence like the '50s can't happen again.

Here's a link from the CT Post about the major wind events since The Long Island Express in '38 (before they gave the storms names).
 

JRRRJ

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The insurance companies who assess risk disagree. Connecticut doesn't have to deal with hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, temperature extremes, high winds, damaging hail, floods, or severe ice storms. None of these things are issues for Connecticut. It helps to have a small state with a climate moderated by the Atlantic Ocean.
Again, talking short-term trends. The insurers want to keep premiums low for competitive reasons, so they're willing to take an occasional bath (mitigated by buying reinsurance from places like Lloyd's) when the extreme events occur.

I'll give you volcanoes & significant earthquakes. But during the 38 years (1951-1989) I lived in CT, I experienced:

1. A number of bad ice storms, where rain froze on the trees and there were massive limb- and tree-falls due to the weight of the ice, and the roads were undriveable until they were sanded and salted. Many power lines were taken out by the falling lumber. We were without power for 8 days in 1973 ("The Great Ice Storm"), and we were in a populous area of Manchester. Parts of CT were powerless for weeks, and parts of northern New England for more than a month.
2. I saw hail that was in the baseball-size range in central CT. Replaced 2 windshields because of it, on separate occasions.
3. The 20th-century mini ice age was during the '50s and early '60s (in my experience, I was born in '51). There was a light dusting of snow on our sidewalks that I had to sweep off seemingly every morning in the winter. A moderate-to-heavy snow at least once a week. The sidewalks at our Manchester home were valleys through a 1-to-3 foot field of snow for most of the winter, excepting the occasional thaw. The piles left by the snow plows in front of our house on a narrow street were over my head. The mounds we made at the end of our driveway by shoveling a hole through those piles for the cars were big enough for us to hollow out to make igloos. I used to shower just before leaving home to walk to the school bus stop most mornings. And my hair usually froze while I was enroute. Sub-zero temps were common. I went tent camping in '61 at our Boy Scout troop's campsite in Coventry on one of the 2 coldest days in CT history (The record at Bradley Field was -32 degrees F. I'm pretty sure it was colder in Coventry. ;^)
4. CT doesn't have to deal with frequent tornadoes, but there were at least 2 that I remember that tore up multiple homes in the (early-to-mid?)'80s. One, I believe, was in Poqonnock.
5. High winds & floods: see my previous post.
 
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