New Orleans

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#1
Am taking my wife there for the Tulane game and then some sightseeing., I've been there once and know a little about touring there but would love suggestions. Anyone?
 
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#3
Am taking my wife there for the Tulane game and then some sightseeing., I've been there once and know a little about touring there but would love suggestions. Anyone?
A few questions:
Your age range?
Have you picked out a place to stay yet?
Are you on a tight budget?
Are you and your wife adventuresome diners?
Length of stay?
‘Tis my hometown...I can help.
 
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#4
Thank you for this. We're in our 60s, staying at the Wyndham French Quarter, My wife uses a mobility scooter. Fairly tight budget, and we are not very adventuresome when it come to food. I am thinking maybe taking her over to Frenchmen St. for some music after the game and a gray line (or equivalent tour the day after the game. Thoughts?
 
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#5
First off, you’re going at a good time of year. March is the prettiest month of the year there, when everything is blooming, but even though you’ll be in advance of that, the weather is likely to be quite temperate. In that regard, while your idea of doing some sightseeing by bus, given physical limitations, is smart, should the weather be nice I’d recommend the Hop On Hop Off double-decker tour. It’s well-guided, but offers the open-air option which is very pleasant. Then, even if you’re unable to do much hopping on and off, you’ll get a nice, concentrated tour that hits all the top highlights.
I endorse the Frenchmen St idea for music, especially because of Snug Harbor, a particularly good venue.
New Orleans, eating-wise, is a great place to be, even on a tight budget, because so much of the best food is found in joints. When I say joints, I mean that literally, but, don’t worry...you won’t be disappointed. Great poorboy sandwiches at Domilise’s, corner Annunciation and Bellcastle Sts. The italian Muffaletta sandwich, at Central Grocery on Decatur St in the quarter, near where you’re staying, is to die for. On game day, since you’ll be eating an early, pre-game meal, you might consider stopping at Superior Seafood on St Charles Ave at Napoleon Ave...great happy hour oysters ( for cheap!), good gumbo, etc., then it’s just a bit farther down the Avenue to Tulane.
For dinner one night, if you’d like to try a venue for true New Orleans cuisine at very moderate prices, check out Elizabeth’s Cafe, Chartres St at Gallier St. Truly a joint, but popular and good.
Finally, if you want to splurge a bit more, Brigtsen’s ( bright sens), in an old creole cottage in the Riverbend area, has scrumptious local cuisine. Enjoy your time there...I can’t get there myself til early March.
 
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#6
First off, you’re going at a good time of year. March is the prettiest month of the year there, when everything is blooming, but even though you’ll be in advance of that, the weather is likely to be quite temperate. In that regard, while your idea of doing some sightseeing by bus, given physical limitations, is smart, should the weather be nice I’d recommend the Hop On Hop Off double-decker tour. It’s well-guided, but offers the open-air option which is very pleasant. Then, even if you’re unable to do much hopping on and off, you’ll get a nice, concentrated tour that hits all the top highlights.
I endorse the Frenchmen St idea for music, especially because of Snug Harbor, a particularly good venue.
New Orleans, eating-wise, is a great place to be, even on a tight budget, because so much of the best food is found in joints. When I say joints, I mean that literally, but, don’t worry...you won’t be disappointed. Great poorboy sandwiches at Domilise’s, corner Annunciation and Bellcastle Sts. The italian Muffaletta sandwich, at Central Grocery on Decatur St in the quarter, near where you’re staying, is to die for. On game day, since you’ll be eating an early, pre-game meal, you might consider stopping at Superior Seafood on St Charles Ave at Napoleon Ave...great happy hour oysters ( for cheap!), good gumbo, etc., then it’s just a bit farther down the Avenue to Tulane.
For dinner one night, if you’d like to try a venue for true New Orleans cuisine at very moderate prices, check out Elizabeth’s Cafe, Chartres St at Gallier St. Truly a joint, but popular and good.
Finally, if you want to splurge a bit more, Brigtsen’s ( bright sens), in an old creole cottage in the Riverbend area, has scrumptious local cuisine. Enjoy your time there...I can’t get there myself til early March.
Thank you so much. All the ideas sound really good. We'll definitely try some and report back.
 

huskypantz

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#7
Hey folks, sorry to revisit but I have some NO questions. Looks like wife and I might take a last-minute trip. We'd be there 2/19-2/22. Technically we'll have 2.5 days of sightseeing there. I want to stay at a Marriott property, any recommendations on hotel location? Must see things to do, places/restaurants/bars? We're in our 40's so no crazy partying but we definitely will hit up a few bars/night clubs.
 
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#8
Glad I caught your inquiry. While you’ll be in the city prior to Mardi Gras itself, Carnival season will be in full swing. There are several Marriott properties, but the flagship location, which I’d recommend, is on Canal St., the main downtown avenue, and at the entry point to the French Quarter. From there you can easily walk most everywhere, the safest streets being those close by, and adjacent to the river. Galatoire’s (jacket required) is sort of a creole bistro that has delicious food, a few blocks away. Best to go without reservation and sit downstairs. Be slightly disingenuous and request “John,” your “usual” waiter. Three restaurants I particularly love, all a brief cab ride away: Commander’s Palace, Brigtsen’s, and Herbsaint. Favorite poor boy joint: Domilise’s (on Annunciation St.). Best jazz club: Snug Harbor. Have fun!
 

8893

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#9
Hey folks, sorry to revisit but I have some NO questions. Looks like wife and I might take a last-minute trip. We'd be there 2/19-2/22. Technically we'll have 2.5 days of sightseeing there. I want to stay at a Marriott property, any recommendations on hotel location? Must see things to do, places/restaurants/bars? We're in our 40's so no crazy partying but we definitely will hit up a few bars/night clubs.
I love both the Renaissance and Pere Marquette Marriott properties in New Orleans. Two of my favorite hotels there. Both great locations.
 
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#10
Just returned from there a couple of weeks ago. While I am far from an expert, I have some ideas:
1. If you have not been to the city before, orient yourself with a 2 1/2 hour bus tour. Make sure it goes to a cemetery, among other things. We found the steamboat ride to offer little in the way of sightseeing (it's a river, okay?) and the food was godawful.
2. If you are into war stuff, I hear the WWII museum is a must-see. Not my cup o tea, but lots of folks go.
3. Ride at least one trolley, more if you can. Just because.
3. If your bodies are up to it, try to do a lot of walking.The architecture is wondrous,. My favorite may be Esplanade Street, one of the streets that delineates a border of the French Quarter.
4. You might be able to find good music on Bourbon St., but don't bet on it. Head to Frenchmen Street, not far from the border of the French Quarter. good clubs and always good music.
5. Do you like music? There are a number of walking music tours. Let me put in a plug for a guy named Keith Abel (find him on line) who gives a helluva walking music tour. He's sort of scattered at first, but brings it all together by the end. On our tour, he spoke for 2 1/2 hours straight. One highlight is a laundromat. Don't ask. Just go. I highly recommend it.
6. Restaurants can be as pricey as you want them to be. We've eaten at Acme Oyster House on two trips. A fun, informal place, where tourists and locals go. Good food.
7. Places you really should see: Jackson Square and St. Louis Cathedral. Nearby, the French Market (flea markets and shops and restaurants) and near that, the state Jazz Museum (not a must-see, but fun if you have an extra hour). The Garden District, full of great houses. Louis Armstrong Square and Congo Square, both of which show up on the walking music tour, above.)
That should keep you busy.
 
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#11
1. Take the St Charles streetcar the entire route to experience several neighborhoods. Get off at Washington St and have lunch at Commander’s Palace
Bread pudding!! $.25 martinis
Visit the cemetary across the street and do a walking tour of the neighborhood
You can find a self guided tour on line

2. WWII museum
3. City park via streetcar or bus and visit the sculpture garden and NOMA
4. Nearby is Liuzza’s by the track shrimp poboy, gumbo etc
5. Brigsten’s for a tremendous dinner
6. Bacchanal in the Bywater for outdoor music, wine, drinks dinner cheese plates
7. Cafe Beignet on Royal
8. Frenchmen St, we like 3 muses
9. Walk walk walk and if you run or walk, the Crescent City trail is a great area along the river. Starts near the end of Esplande
10. Audobon park for a stroll and under rated zoo

So many more, just a few of my personal faves
 
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huskypantz

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#12
Excellent, thanks for all the feedback! I got a great rate with AAA at Renaissance Pere Marquette, looks like that's a fairly central location. I run and my wife enjoys walking/hiking so we'll definitely get some miles in. Any thoughts/recommendations on an airboat or swamp tour?
 

8893

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#14
We took this tour a few yrs ago.
Honey Island Swamp Tour provided by Historic New Orleans Tours | New Orleans, Louisiana - TripAdvisor

Nearby your hotel for HH oysters is Lüke in the Hilton on St Charles
Car rental is unnecesary, take a taxi from the airport. Same cost as a shuttle.
Of course, no car makes the swamp tour more difficult
Second this entirely, especially Honey Island Swamp Tour. Except I use Lyft instead of taxi these days. Swamp Tour will pick you up at your hotel for additional cost.

I love raw oysters, but not in New Orleans; I only eat them cooked there, and the charbroiled ones at Drago's and Acme are tremendous--one of the best bites in all New Orleans imo. If you do go to Luke, get the flammenkuchen (trust me) and their version of French 75 cocktail, one of my all-time favorite cocktails. Happy hour at Luke (or any other Besh restaurants) are among the best deals in town; and lunch at Commander's Palace is the absolute best deal imo (especially if you drink your limit of three 10-cent martinis--yes, you read that right).

You will love the Pere Marquette. The rooms are like vaults (i.e., heavy doors and well insulated from noise) and the bathrooms and beds are great. You can do a nice run from there up through the French Quarter, and then back along the river walk. If you want a longer run there is a nice trail through City Park.
 

8893

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#15
1. Take the St Charles streetcar the entire route to experience several neghboorhoods. Get off at Washington St and have lunch at Commander’s Palace
Bread pudding!! $.25 martinis
Visit the cemetary across the street and do a walking tour of the neighborhood
You can find a self guided tour on line

2. WWII museum
3. City park via streetcar or bus and visit the sculpture garden and NOMA
4. Nearby is Liuzza’s by the track shrimp poboy, gumbo etc
5. Brigsten’s for a tremendous dinner
6. Bacchanal in the Bywater for outdoor music, wine, drinks dinner cheese plates
7. Cafe Beignet on Royal
8. Frenchmen St, we like 3 muses
9. Walk walk walk and if you run or walk, the Crescent City trail is a great area along the river. Starts near the end of Esplande
10. Audobon park for a stroll and under rated zoo

So many more, just a few of my personal faves
Second these, too. At Brigsten's (also my favorite), make sure one of you gets the seafood platter--possibly the best entree, ever.
 
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#16
We took this tour a few yrs ago.
Honey Island Swamp Tour provided by Historic New Orleans Tours | New Orleans, Louisiana - TripAdvisor

Nearby your hotel for HH oysters is Lüke in the Hilton on St Charles
Car rental is unnecesary, take a taxi from the airport. Same cost as a shuttle.
Of course, no car makes the swamp tour more difficult
We did a similar swamp tour the last time we went to New Orleans the last time that city hosted the women's final four. In addition to the odd alligator, we came across tame wild boars in the swamp. They were partial to the marshmallows that the crew would throw out to them.

As was mentioned earlier, for music Snug Harbor on Frenchmen Street is an excellent venue.
 
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SubbaBub

Your stupidity is ruining my country.
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#17
I thought the 21 Amendment bar had a good music vibe. Much less crazy than some of the others on Bourbon St.
 

huskypantz

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#18
Thanks again for the tips- we had a great trip, I’ll provide my experiences for future yarders heading to NO who might peruse this thread.
  • Hotel was Pere-Marquette. Excellent location. Solid customer service. Serviceable bar/restaurant. We received a complimentary bottle of wine and chocolate truffles. Would return.
  • Honey Island swamp tour - this was well worth it for us. About a hour drive and our driver provided us unsolicited stories of taxi cab murders along the way. Raccoons and feral pigs came right up to the boat. We saw herons, egrets, vultures, turtles, snakes and of course a couple of gators. Apparently it was a little too cold for most gators to surface.
  • Restaurants included Acme and Brigtsen’s. Overall, the food was great - grilled oysters were our favorite. We ate a LOT of oysters along with some po boys, crawfish and gator.
  • Music was great. Saw a cool funk band at Bandstand on Bourbon. Made it to Snug Harbor for one show. Music was on street corners everywhere, it is ingrained in the city’s culture.
  • We did a lot of walking- canal to French Market, both along the river and via bourbon. The Frenchman St outlying area was a little sketchy but overall reasonably safe in tourist areas.
  • Uber note from a Newby - I did not realize how much the rates swing during busy hours. We switched over to fixed rate taxis as the situation warranted.
  • It is incredible how Katrina reshaped the city and region. The ride to Slidell/Honey Island really opens your eyes.
Those are my cliff notes. Fun trip.
 

dvegas

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#19
Ms Mae's The Club at Napolean and Magazine for the Ted's in New Orleans experience (24/7)

and Cassamentos 2 doors down for righteous seafood
 
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#20
I love raw oysters, but not in New Orleans; I only eat them cooked there, and the charbroiled ones at Drago's and Acme are tremendous--one of the best bites in all New Orleans imo.
@8893 Why? Cooking, charbroiling, frying, etc cooks out some of the heavy metals, chemicals, refinery by-products, etc the Mississippi carries into the Gulf? Just don't like Gulf oystahs? Some hybrid reasons?
 

8893

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#21
@8893 Why? Cooking, charbroiling, frying, etc cooks out some of the heavy metals, chemicals, refinery by-products, etc the Mississippi carries into the Gulf? Just don't like Gulf oystahs? Some hybrid reasons?
I guess I'd say hybrid.

For starters, I am a big believer in "The colder the water the better the oyster," and I don't think the water ever gets cold enough down there.

I also prefer briny and firm oysters, like the ones from northern Maine and The Maritimes; the Gulf oysters, by comparison, are too flaccid, too big and not briny enough for my tastes.

Finally, I have a theory that people prefer the sea salt content, air, smell and taste of the area where they are from, which is likely why I prefer oysters from the Northeast (I'm not too keen on West Coast oysters, either). I can smell the swamp near where I live and think it smells like fresh sea salt air; but when I smell the swamp in Louisiana it smells like ass to me.
 
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#22
I guess I'd say hybrid. For starters, I am a big believer in "The colder the water the better the oyster," and I don't think the water ever gets cold enough down there. ...
Ah, only oystahs from months with an "ah" in 'em preference. Hence, no Aprils, Mays, Junes, Julys, Augusts oystahs.
 

Chin Diesel

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#25
Thanks again for the tips- we had a great trip, I’ll provide my experiences for future yarders heading to NO who might peruse this thread.
  • Hotel was Pere-Marquette. Excellent location. Solid customer service. Serviceable bar/restaurant. We received a complimentary bottle of wine and chocolate truffles. Would return.
  • Honey Island swamp tour - this was well worth it for us. About a hour drive and our driver provided us unsolicited stories of taxi cab murders along the way. Raccoons and feral pigs came right up to the boat. We saw herons, egrets, vultures, turtles, snakes and of course a couple of gators. Apparently it was a little too cold for most gators to surface.
  • Restaurants included Acme and Brigtsen’s. Overall, the food was great - grilled oysters were our favorite. We ate a LOT of oysters along with some po boys, crawfish and gator.
  • Music was great. Saw a cool funk band at Bandstand on Bourbon. Made it to Snug Harbor for one show. Music was on street corners everywhere, it is ingrained in the city’s culture.
  • We did a lot of walking- canal to French Market, both along the river and via bourbon. The Frenchman St outlying area was a little sketchy but overall reasonably safe in tourist areas.
  • Uber note from a Newby - I did not realize how much the rates swing during busy hours. We switched over to fixed rate taxis as the situation warranted.
  • It is incredible how Katrina reshaped the city and region. The ride to Slidell/Honey Island really opens your eyes.
Those are my cliff notes. Fun trip.
Very good summary.

Seems like you were able to catch the vibe of the area vice just seeing touristy things. Nice.
 

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