Music: Favorite Jazz piece or album

SVCBeercats

KARMA! Its called KARMA!
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#52
They searched high and low for someone to sing "This guy's in love with you," and finally settled on Herb's deadpan delivery, which worked perfectly. I'm not sure, did he ever sing anything else? Another bit of trivia: I think Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass had something like four or five albums in the top ten at one point in the mid-late 60's. If you pose the question, Who had the most albums in the top ten in the 60's, I bet 50 people will say the Beatles for every 1 who says Herb.
Alpert is the only recording artist to have a # 1 as both a vocalist and an instrumentalist - This Guy's in Love with You, 1968, and Rise, 1979. Alpert actually started his career as a vocalist.

Vocals:
Dore Alpert (Herb Alpert) - Dreamland - 1961 Teen Pop on RCA Victor Compact 33 pressing (as Dore Alpert)
Herb Alpert This Guy's in Love with You
Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass - To Wait For Love

Rather clear why he became a great instrumentalist. ;):rolleyes:
 

CL82

Trust the process
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#54
How about:

Latin/middle eastern? Who'd have thunk it? Definitely works.
 

jonson

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#55
Lush Life - John Coltrane. Genius.
For Coltrane--and from among many--I'll go with one that doesn't seem to get a lot of attention: "Out of this World" from the Impulse album labeled Coltrane. (I was fortunate enough to see him live 4x before his too-early passing.) For Miles, I guess the entire second side of Kind of Blue (I realize that's two tracks, not one)--first jazz album I bought knowing absolutely nothing about what I was lucking into. For Mingus, hard to say, but basically anything from the MingusMingusMingusMingusMingus Impulse album. Unfortunately, I got to see the last two live only once each, although, in Mingus's case, I did watch him almost getting into a fight with a customer (at the Village Vanguard in NYC) who was talking too much while the band played. They introduced a relatively young comedian named Bill Cosby to calm things down.
 
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#57
For Coltrane--and from among many--I'll go with one that doesn't seem to get a lot of attention: "Out of this World" from the Impulse album labeled Coltrane. (I was fortunate enough to see him live 4x before his too-early passing.) For Miles, I guess the entire second side of Kind of Blue (I realize that's two tracks, not one)--first jazz album I bought knowing absolutely nothing about what I was lucking into. For Mingus, hard to say, but basically anything from the MingusMingusMingusMingusMingus Impulse album. Unfortunately, I got to see the last two live only once each, although, in Mingus's case, I did watch him almost getting into a fight with a customer (at the Village Vanguard in NYC) who was talking too much while the band played. They introduced a relatively young comedian named Bill Cosby to calm things down.
You are one lucky man. 4x! Once would have been nirvana for me. Miles and Mingus. You're my hero.
 
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#59
I listened to the album " The Sound Of Jazz" while living in Louisiana ( compliments of Uncle Sam ). Just played it again for old time sake. Just wonderful.
A great record. When I bought the original record I said to myself that this is a great recording dying to get out. Sure enough Classic Records did a fine reissue that sounds as good as the performances.
 
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Bigboote

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#60
Alpert is the only recording artist to have a # 1 as both a vocalist and an instrumentalist - This Guy's in Love with You, 1968, and Rise, 1979. Alpert actually started his career as a vocalist.

Vocals:
Dore Alpert (Herb Alpert) - Dreamland - 1961 Teen Pop on RCA Victor Compact 33 pressing (as Dore Alpert)
Herb Alpert This Guy's in Love with You
Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass - To Wait For Love

Rather clear why he became a great instrumentalist. ;):rolleyes:
I had no idea he’d started out as a singer. Every day I learn something interesting is a good day.
 
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#61
For Coltrane--and from among many--I'll go with one that doesn't seem to get a lot of attention: "Out of this World" from the Impulse album labeled Coltrane. (I was fortunate enough to see him live 4x before his too-early passing.) For Miles, I guess the entire second side of Kind of Blue (I realize that's two tracks, not one)--first jazz album I bought knowing absolutely nothing about what I was lucking into. For Mingus, hard to say, but basically anything from the MingusMingusMingusMingusMingus Impulse album. Unfortunately, I got to see the last two live only once each, although, in Mingus's case, I did watch him almost getting into a fight with a customer (at the Village Vanguard in NYC) who was talking too much while the band played. They introduced a relatively young comedian named Bill Cosby to calm things down.
You saw Coltrane, Miles and Mingus in person. You win. And have become my hero.:D
 

LETTERL

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#62
Hannibal's Boogie

Here's another personal favorite. Spyro Gyra's Hannibal's Boogie, from their Point Of View album. I always thought this was one of their best songs...but it didn't even make it onto their Greatest Hits album. Hannibal's Boogie is the fifth cut on the album; the fourth cut, The Unknown Solider, did make it onto the Greatest Hits recording.
 

Bama fan

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#67
I'm a sucker for Brazilian jazz. 'Wave' is one of my favorites from the incomparable Antonio Carlos Jobim.

I heard a piece by the Sao Paolo band Bixiga 70 the other day. If you are not familiar, check them out on line. Not Jobim, but evolved from that tradition> Hope you like it. :)
 
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#68
220px-Getz-gilberto.jpg

Someone mentioned Antonio Carlos Jobim. I'm shocked that nobody has mentioned this CLASSIC.

Going OG (off genre) slightly, someone else mentioned having seen Coltraine, Miles Davis and Mingus live reminded me of my college days, when I saw Hendrix, Joplin and Morrison live before they all died far too young. Morrison I remember in particular because I was just two weeks at college in September of 1967 when I saw the Doors at a MIXER in the HOCKEY RINK of all places.

Back to jazz, I'm also reminded of the early 70's when there used to be something in NYC called the Jazz Boat. They took a retired Staten Island Ferry, put several Jazz groups on different decks and ran it in the early evening up and down the Hudson from Battery Park. The one I'll never forget was seeing Brubeck on the evening of the day Philippe Petit walked his tight rope wire between the not yet completed Twin Towers. The wire hadn't yet been removed, so it was still clearly visible as we cruised by to the strains of Take Five.
 

Bama fan

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#69
View attachment 40573
Someone mentioned Antonio Carlos Jobim. I'm shocked that nobody has mentioned this CLASSIC.

Going OG (off genre) slightly, someone else mentioned having seen Coltraine, Miles Davis and Mingus live reminded me of my college days, when I saw Hendrix, Joplin and Morrison live before they all died far too young. Morrison I remember in particular because I was just two weeks at college in September of 1967 when I saw the Doors at a MIXER in the HOCKEY RINK of all places.

Back to jazz, I'm also reminded of the early 70's when there used to be something in NYC called the Jazz Boat. They took a retired Staten Island Ferry, put several Jazz groups on different decks and ran it in the early evening up and down the Hudson from Battery Park. The one I'll never forget was seeing Brubeck on the evening of the day Philippe Petit walked his tight rope wire between the not yet completed Twin Towers. The wire hadn't yet been removed, so it was still clearly visible as we cruised by to the strains of Take Five.
You only lasted two weeks in college? I did a little better than that! ;) BTW, great posting!
 

Horatio

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#70
Pharoah Sanders- A Prayer Before Dawn

Cassandra Wilson- Traveling Miles, Blue Light TIL Dawn, New Moons Daughter, Blue Skies

John Coltrane- Love Supreme
John Coltrane Quartet- Live at the Village Vanguard

Miles Davis- Filles De Kilamanjaro

And this masterpiece
23726E25-58B0-4D28-AFB9-F9C3EB141A29.jpeg
 

Horatio

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#71
Pieces-

Landscape for Future Earth- Keith Jarrett
Spiritual- John Coltrane
Living Space- John Coltrane
Waters of March- Cassandra Wilson
Frelon Bun- Miles Davis
Someday my prince will come - Cassandra Wilson
 

wbball novice

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#73
My Foolish Heart -- on Bill Evans' Waltz for Debby album, a live recording at the Village Vanguard.

On the Nile -- on the album Jackknife. Leader was Jackie McLean on alto sax, but the stars of the cut were trumpeters Charles Tolliver, who wrote the song, paired with Lee Morgan. Two brassy trumpets played at a stately pace, like Cleopatra's barge sailing down the Nile. (I also play Morgan's The Sidewinder a lot)

The Cylinder -- The Modern Jazz Quartet Live in Europe (the sustained tones on the vibraphone at the beginning of the solo anticipate blues guitar technique of the next decade)

Rain Danse [sic] -- Phil Woods Sextet. This was originally on a double LP called (if I remember correctly) Live at the Riverboat. My copy is on an abridged single CD with another title. I like the 4 choruses by Woods played at high speed that create the impression of a logical thread.

Strollin' -- Emily Remler, guitar. Used to play this Sunday mornings if it was sunny.

Chasin the Trane. From Live at the Village Vanguard, one of the first jazz records I got in college.

The Sermon -- Jimmy Smith. From a compilation CD.
 

Bigboote

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#75
Thelonius Monk- Well, you needn't.
When I was a kid I had a Miles Davis album that included a very slow version of this tune. It must have been recorded soon after the famous blowup between Miles and Monk, because it was just about farcical. I don’t remember which soloist, but one of the solos included a full rendition of Pop goes the Weasel, and during Miles’s solo, the piano was feeding him chords and arpeggios that could have also been from nursery rhyme tunes.
 

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