Mir McLean, Live and In Person

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If not for knee injuries and substance abuse, David could have been Michael Jordan. I believe he had a better vertical leap.

Is there anywhere that you have NOT lived? ;)
it's that UConn witness protection program.................they move you around the country every few years to scout high school basketball players.........:rolleyes:
 
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Yes! I lived in Denver when he played for the ABA Nuggets (coached by Larry Brown in overalls). At 6'4" he would get WAY above the basket on the way to a Dr. J-inspired dunk (it was also a thrill when the Doctor came to town and flew from beyond the free throw line with that red, white & blue basketball high in the air).
Not just way above the basket. My memory could be playing tricks on me, but I believe he once jumped high enough to snatch a quarter that had been placed on the top of the background.
 

MilfordHusky

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Regarding David, I recall a UCLA player saying that opponents never tried an alley-oop with Walton in the paint on defense, but N.C. State not only had the audacity to attempt it, but also the ability to convert from the top of the backboard.

Mir does not get THAT high, but she rises—quickly—above the crowd to snare rebounds and passes. Yes, she’ll be a fan favorite.

Get your camera and DVR ready!
 
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Check the February Recruiting thread for some more on Mir. She had 28 and 18 last night in a conference quarterfinal game. Two videos show her explosiveness. She gets off the floor much like Gabby. The opponent is reaching and looking for the ball, but Mir has already snared it. Anyone remember David Thompson?
Thompson (NBA: ‎1975–1984) was dubbed "The Skywalker". When the conversation got around to players with outrageous leaping ability during that era, the first name mentioned was the 6-4 Thompson.

The basketball legend nicknamed “Skywalker” for his otherworldly leaping ability will celebrate 31 years of sobriety in December. The man who Michael Jordan idolized. Thompson helped us realize what was possible on the basketball court. He is credited with popularizing the alley oop. As a rookie with the Nuggets, he went toe to toe with Julius Erving in the first-ever Slam Dunk Contest. He once scored 73 points in an NBA game. Shortly thereafter, he signed a then-record $4 million contract.

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His 42-inch vertical leap landed him in the Guinness Book of World Records as a freshman at North Carolina State. That year, he also was on the finishing end of an alley oop for the first time, which like Post-it notes and penicillin was a happy accident. During practice, Thompson was getting overplayed by his defender. He cut toward the basket, wrangled a lob pass from point guard Monte Towe and dropped it in the orange cylinder mid-flight.

“Coach (Norman) Sloan stopped practice,” Thompson said. “He said, ‘Hey, I like that. Maybe we can put that in our offense.’ Smart coach he was.”

Dunking was banned in college at the time, so Thompson wasn’t able to punctuate those lob passes as authoritatively as he would’ve liked.
 
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Thompson (NBA: ‎1975–1984) was dubbed "The Skywalker". When the conversation got around to players with outrageous leaping ability during that era, the first name mentioned was the 6-4 Thompson.

The basketball legend nicknamed “Skywalker” for his otherworldly leaping ability will celebrate 31 years of sobriety in December. The man who Michael Jordan idolized. Thompson helped us realize what was possible on the basketball court. He is credited with popularizing the alley oop. As a rookie with the Nuggets, he went toe to toe with Julius Erving in the first-ever Slam Dunk Contest. He once scored 73 points in an NBA game. Shortly thereafter, he signed a then-record $4 million contract.

View attachment 50858

His 42-inch vertical leap landed him in the Guinness Book of World Records as a freshman at North Carolina State. That year, he also was on the finishing end of an alley oop for the first time, which like Post-it notes and penicillin was a happy accident. During practice, Thompson was getting overplayed by his defender. He cut toward the basket, wrangled a lob pass from point guard Monte Towe and dropped it in the orange cylinder mid-flight.

“Coach (Norman) Sloan stopped practice,” Thompson said. “He said, ‘Hey, I like that. Maybe we can put that in our offense.’ Smart coach he was.”

Dunking was banned in college at the time, so Thompson wasn’t able to punctuate those lob passes as authoritatively as he would’ve liked.
That was great until Jordan came along at 48 inches. BTW, the record now is Evan Ungar from Canada in 2016 at 63.5 inches.
 

cohenzone

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Not an exaggeration. I saw Thompson in a TV game where he got injured when his foot caught a defender’s shoulder at the top of his jump and he fell to the floor. But still, if a vert can be unworldly, I don’t know what Spud Webb’s vert was, but he could dunk at about 5’6” or so. That’s nuts.
 
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That was great until Jordan came along at 48 inches. BTW, the record now is Evan Ungar from Canada in 2016 at 63.5 inches.
I thought that was a typo, or that you were hallucinating until I watched it on YouTube. However, I think the technique that was employed, and the way the jump was measured made all the difference. When verticals are measured at, say, the football combine, the score is the difference between the height one reaches while standing flat-footed with ones arms stretched straight overhead and height one achieves overhead after jumping. In the case of the Canadian recordholder, the score was based on the height of a "box" onto which he jumped. Ungar achieved his amazing year by beginning in a deep squat, propelling himself upwards and forward, and landing on the box in a tucked position. Truly impressive, but completely useless if you are trying to catch a pass, snare a rebound, block a shot, or dunk a basketball. Apples and oranges.
 
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I thought that was a typo, or that you were hallucinating until I watched it on YouTube. However, I think the technique that was employed, and the way the jump was measured made all the difference. When verticals are measured at, say, the football combine, the score is the difference between the height one reaches while standing flat-footed with ones arms stretched straight overhead and height one achieves overhead after jumping. In the case of the Canadian recordholder, the score was based on the height of a "box" onto which he jumped. Ungar achieved his amazing year by beginning in a deep squat, propelling himself upwards and forward, and landing on the box in a tucked position. Truly impressive, but completely useless if you are trying to catch a pass, snare a rebound, block a shot, or dunk a basketball. Apples and oranges.
You are correct.
As far as the highest vertical jump (measured the traditional way of difference between standing reach and highest point one can touch on a jump) goes, here is what I know.
As far as I can tell, the highest vertical jumps, that were confirmed, were the 49 1/2" vertical of (6'1" tall) Jordan Kilganon, and the 50" jump of the 5'11" Daniel Kabeya.
See at the 2:40 mark for JG

WHAT A 50 INCH VERTICAL LOOKS LIKE!!! (Daniel Kabeya Vertical Story)
 
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I thought that was a typo, or that you were hallucinating until I watched it on YouTube. However, I think the technique that was employed, and the way the jump was measured made all the difference. When verticals are measured at, say, the football combine, the score is the difference between the height one reaches while standing flat-footed with ones arms stretched straight overhead and height one achieves overhead after jumping. In the case of the Canadian recordholder, the score was based on the height of a "box" onto which he jumped. Ungar achieved his amazing year by beginning in a deep squat, propelling himself upwards and forward, and landing on the box in a tucked position. Truly impressive, but completely useless if you are trying to catch a pass, snare a rebound, block a shot, or dunk a basketball. Apples and oranges.
Thanks for the info. I only googled the info, didn't go on to watch the video. I agree, it's a lot harder to be carrying a BB or catching a FB when you go up.
 

Sluconn Husky

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Demonstrating her excellent body control, McLean hit several acrobatic, twisting layups, including a couple on inbounds plays, despite being double-teamed when she got the ball.

...

Known for scoring the bulk of her points on putbacks in the past because she’s so hard to box out, McLean has found several other ways to score. She hit a 3-pointer on Tuesday and ended up shooting 10-of-14 from the field.

She’s still a menace on the boards, grabbing 18 rebounds on Tuesday. Plus, she looks for open teammates when drawing double-teams, and she had four assists against the Vikings.



 

MilfordHusky

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Demonstrating her excellent body control, McLean hit several acrobatic, twisting layups, including a couple on inbounds plays, despite being double-teamed when she got the ball.

...

Known for scoring the bulk of her points on putbacks in the past because she’s so hard to box out, McLean has found several other ways to score. She hit a 3-pointer on Tuesday and ended up shooting 10-of-14 from the field.

She’s still a menace on the boards, grabbing 18 rebounds on Tuesday. Plus, she looks for open teammates when drawing double-teams, and she had four assists against the Vikings.



Mir may need to learn more basketball, but she has physical gifts that can't be taught. She reminds me a lot of the Gabulous One.
 
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Gabby had some other elite skills besides her great leaping ability which earned her playing time. Even as a freshman Gabby was the best interior passer on a team full of great passers, her first step with the ball was elite enough to get by even great defenders. Gabby also didn't miss many bunnies at the basket either except for that one time in the championship game against ND. I agree with you, Mir is going to have to bring something else to the table to earn playing time because that F position is going to be loaded (Megan, Anna, Aubrey, & Aaliyah). I also could envision UCONN utilizing a 3 guard line up next year also which could be problem for Mir.
Given the extended periods of cold shooting we have seen this season there will be a serious need for offensive rebounders. McClean and Griffin may be busy
 
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Given the extended periods of cold shooting we have seen this season there will be a serious need for offensive rebounders. McClean and Griffin may be busy. ;)
frankly I'd prefer some shooters who have a 45%+ likelihood of making their shots the first time............other then PB I'm still not sure how many of the other recruits will fit that criteria
 
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frankly I'd prefer some shooters who have a 45%+ likelihood of making their shots the first time............other then PB I'm still not sure how many of the other recruits will fit that criteria
I agree, does McLean have an outside shot?
 
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frankly I'd prefer some shooters who have a 45%+ likelihood of making their shots the first time............other then PB I'm still not sure how many of the other recruits will fit that criteria
I rewatched last summer's U19 game between the US and Canada and frankly Edwards was a non-factor for much of the game. I am very optimistic that eventually she can be a star because she has the physical tolls, but at least last summer she didn't compete very well against the US.

I continue to see a pattern where HS recruits are touted as the next big thing, who will fit right into the rotation and contribute, only to see them flounder. Griffin is an exciting prospect who I hope to see develop into a great college player. She has athletic tools that are rare and shows flashes of what she can become but she is not ready for prime time even now, late in her freshman year.
There are a few prodigies (I think Bueckers is one) but for the rest starting out at UConn it is a struggle. Next season, with the exception of Bueckers, the success of the Huskies will rest with the 5 returning players. I expect them to be a completely finished product, polished and hardened. The freshman class? I'll pass on predicting.
 

CocoHusky

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I rewatched last summer's U19 game between the US and Canada and frankly Edwards was a non-factor for much of the game. I am very optimistic that eventually she can be a star because she has the physical tolls, but at least last summer she didn't compete very well against the US.

I continue to see a pattern where HS recruits are touted as the next big thing, who will fit right into the rotation and contribute, only to see them flounder. Griffin is an exciting prospect who I hope to see develop into a great college player. She has athletic tools that are rare and shows flashes of what she can become but she is not ready for prime time even now, late in her freshman year.
There are a few prodigies (I think Bueckers is one) but for the rest starting out at UConn it is a struggle. Next season, with the exception of Bueckers, the success of the Huskies will rest with the 5 returning players. I expect them to be a completely finished product, polished and hardened. The freshman class? I'll pass on predicting.
Edwards had virtually nothing to work with on that U19 Canadian team last summer. I believe the score at one point was 50 to 16. Aaliyah looked much better when she was moved up to the National team in the fall. I'm not predicting stardom or starting for any of the '20 recruits. What I'm predicting and looking for is contributions to reduce the starters minutes to something under 30 MPG. UCONN currently has 4 starters averaging over 35 minutes per game and that numbers is closer to 40 against ranked teams. UCONN doesn't and hasn't had a reliable 3rd guard for 3 full seasons now and Liv has no backup in the post. What the team needs is 30 MPG of reliable guard play and 25 MPG of reliable front court play from the class of '20. That kind of contribution from the class of 20 would have us as a the top 2-3 team in the country next year without having to rely on any 1 player being superwoman. Mir, Nika, and Aaliyah are also quality defenders which when combined with the added depth allows you to add in game changing defensive wrinkles which are today just not an option.
 
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I rewatched last summer's U19 game between the US and Canada and frankly Edwards was a non-factor for much of the game. I am very optimistic that eventually she can be a star because she has the physical tolls, but at least last summer she didn't compete very well against the US.

I continue to see a pattern where HS recruits are touted as the next big thing, who will fit right into the rotation and contribute, only to see them flounder. Griffin is an exciting prospect who I hope to see develop into a great college player. She has athletic tools that are rare and shows flashes of what she can become but she is not ready for prime time even now, late in her freshman year.
There are a few prodigies (I think Bueckers is one) but for the rest starting out at UConn it is a struggle. Next season, with the exception of Bueckers, the success of the Huskies will rest with the 5 returning players. I expect them to be a completely finished product, polished and hardened. The freshman class? I'll pass on predicting.
agreed................just adding Westbrook and Bueckers to the returning cast will be a shot in the arm................. the athleticism and board strength from the other freshmen will hopefully also help put the team back in contention..........
 
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I rewatched last summer's U19 game between the US and Canada and frankly Edwards was a non-factor for much of the game. I am very optimistic that eventually she can be a star because she has the physical tolls, but at least last summer she didn't compete very well against the US.

I continue to see a pattern where HS recruits are touted as the next big thing, who will fit right into the rotation and contribute, only to see them flounder. Griffin is an exciting prospect who I hope to see develop into a great college player. She has athletic tools that are rare and shows flashes of what she can become but she is not ready for prime time even now, late in her freshman year.
There are a few prodigies (I think Bueckers is one) but for the rest starting out at UConn it is a struggle. Next season, with the exception of Bueckers, the success of the Huskies will rest with the 5 returning players. I expect them to be a completely finished product, polished and hardened. The freshman class? I'll pass on predicting.
I am always skeptical regarding high school players whose stats are based solely on their physical abilities. Unfortunately, many did little to develop their basketball skills. Gabby is often used as an example but if you watch HS videos, she displayed guard and other talents throughout high school. Great to have these players on the team but they usually struggle as frosh/sometimes throughout their time at UConn.
 
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Edwards had virtually nothing to work with on that U19 Canadian team last summer. I believe the score at one point was 50 to 16. Aaliyah looked much better when she was moved up to the National team in the fall. I'm not predicting stardom or starting for any of the '20 recruits. What I'm predicting and looking for is contributions to reduce the starters minutes to something under 30 MPG. UCONN currently has 4 starters averaging over 35 minutes per game and that numbers is closer to 40 against ranked teams. UCONN doesn't and hasn't had a reliable 3rd guard for 3 full seasons now and Liv has no backup in the post. What the team needs is 30 MPG of reliable guard play and 25 MPG of reliable front court play from the class of '20. That kind of contribution from the class of 20 would have us as a the top 2-3 team in the country next year without having to rely on any 1 player being superwoman. Mir, Nika, and Aaliyah are also quality defenders which when combined with the added depth allows you to add in game changing defensive wrinkles which are today just not an option.
Edwards will be a year and a half older than in that U19 game. Hopefully she will pick up things quickly. Her coaches say she is destined for greatness but I've learned to not take HS coaches too seriously. 25 min from Edwards/Gabriel is an optimistic upper limit IMO. More likely under 20 min., and that would presuppose that Gabriel will get into a game before Geno empties his bench. Down the road Edwards could become an integral part of the rotation and a starter but Gabriel is a project, as are many posts coming out of HS. Maybe she will surprise and be able to get 8-10 min/game but that is a dim hope, not an expectation. In a year or two she could become a significant part of the rotation. She is the physical presence UConn has missed for several years.
I think UConn will get all the minutes they need from Westbrook and Bueckers in place of Dangerfield. Of course I'll feel better when Westbrook is off crutches and practicing. With a year playing together and an off-season of individual work this year's underclassmen should be more like what we fans are used to seeing.

I am reminded of the 2007 to 2008 teams. They went from a 4 loss season to a one loss season. I forgot that they entered the NCAA's undefeated and ranked No 1 in 2008.
 

CocoHusky

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Edwards will be a year and a half older than in that U19 game. Hopefully she will pick up things quickly. Her coaches say she is destined for greatness but I've learned to not take HS coaches too seriously. 25 min from Edwards/Gabriel is an optimistic upper limit IMO. More likely under 20 min., and that would presuppose that Gabriel will get into a game before Geno empties his bench. Down the road Edwards could become an integral part of the rotation and a starter but Gabriel is a project, as are many posts coming out of HS. Maybe she will surprise and be able to get 8-10 min/game but that is a dim hope, not an expectation. In a year or two she could become a significant part of the rotation. She is the physical presence UConn has missed for several years.
I think UConn will get all the minutes they need from Westbrook and Bueckers in place of Dangerfield. Of course I'll feel better when Westbrook is off crutches and practicing. With a year playing together and an off-season of individual work this year's underclassmen should be more like what we fans are used to seeing.
I am reminded of the 2007 to 2008 teams. They went from a 4 loss season to a one loss season. I forgot that they entered the NCAA's undefeated and ranked No 1 in 2008.
Edwards is not a post now nor will she ever have to be a post at UCONN. ONO or DeBerry or Brady will man the UCONN post during Edwards entire tenure at UCONN.
 

MilfordHusky

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Regarding Piath, recall that Tierra McCowan was a project as a freshman and turned out very well. Piath is 2-3” shorter, but already runs the floor well and has shooting range.
 

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