Bouknight charged with evading responsibility, interfering with police and more

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It is. And that’s why he’s been charged with evading and interfering. There is simply a charge for leaving the scene- it doesn’t make a distinction as to why. The Boneyard is making that leap. He’s been appropriately charged it would seem.
Yes, he has been appropriately charged. But the reason he has been appropriately charged is that in a very real sense he beat the system. He evaded arrest so he could sober up. He shouldn't get credit for that decision. However a lot of people on this board are giving him credit for that decision because it means they have enough credible deniability to let him play basketball.

Think about what this board would be saying if it was a Louisville BB player in this circumstance.
 

pj

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Yes, he has been appropriately charged. But the reason he has been appropriately charged is that in a very real sense he beat the system. He evaded arrest so he could sober up. He shouldn't get credit for that decision. However a lot of people on this board are giving him credit for that decision because it means they have enough credible deniability to let him play basketball.

Think about what this board would be saying if it was a Louisville BB player in this circumstance.
We'd be saying exactly what you just said.

I think we can give the police and others involved in this credit. They didn't lie or cover anything up. They are not prosecuting Bouknight to the full extent of the law, but they never do in a first offense of a young man. Everything seems to be getting handled in a reasonable way.

Bouknight now has an arrest record and if in the future he repeats bad behavior he won't be treated as leniently. Let's hope there will be no more bad behavior.
 
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You leave out that she took back her statement and therefore he did not take her car without permission. Everything I bolded is wrong and you keep repeating it wont make it become true.

You & Everyone else need to focus on what he is being charged with not what the police report says. That's all hurley and the school will focus on.
Yeah. Because prosecutors never make judgements about what to charge people with. They never let folks plead to lesser charges for various reasons including just to move things along and save the state the time and money of going to trial. Since he already admitted to some of the lesser matters, driving w/o a license, leaving the scene, and the owner recanted on the theft charge the prosecutor likely took the layup. Kid pleads guilty to speeding and no license and leaving the scene and gets a few hours community service and the conviction wiped away if he keeps his nose clean for a couple of years. The other things are harder to prove so they let them go. Of course no prosecutor would ever do that.
 
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A technicality. He took a car without asking permission. Took the keys and the car and left. The victim first said he didn't have permission. Later she said that she didn't remember. Lucky JB.

Truth is we will never know if he stole the car but judging by the subsequent behavior, he doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt. Bad move.
Being charged with a theft crime or not - is more than a technicality. We do have a system of justice in this country and while it’s imperfect - there’s probably not a lot of better ones around the World.

Our system of justice should NOT be administered by sensational headlines in the newspapers. The bureaucrats at UConn also have a responsibility not to buckle to public pressure from the usual UConn MBB haters that we even have in abundance in this UC MBB forum. You know who you are - the usual people who like to celebrate Championships and First Nights but go wobbly knee AWOL regarding what a school needs to do to compete on a level playing field.

Chief also asks people to be respectful about the female student involved. She made mistakes that night too - and hopefully she can be allowed to learn from them under less of a spotlight than James has to endure.
 
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Guilty before proven innocent, got it, thanks.
I'm not a child to be taken in by foolish deceptions. I'm not a defense lawyer bound to distort the truth in the interest of my client. I'm not a judge bound to apply the necessary presumptions of the court. I can use my eyes and my brain. People run from the cops when they think they are going to get hooked up. You don't get cuffed for an accident. You do get cuffed when the accident occurs under the influence. He ran. He knew.

In fact everyone reading this threads knows. But many don't want to admit it because then they would have to act on that admission.
 
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I'm not a child to be taken in by foolish deceptions. I'm not a defense lawyer bound to distort the truth in the interest of my client. I'm not a judge bound to apply the necessary presumptions of the court. I can use my eyes and my brain. People run from the cops when they think they are going to get hooked up. You don't get cuffed for an accident. You do get cuffed when the accident occurs under the influence. He ran. He knew.

In fact everyone reading this threads knows. But many don't want to admit it because then they would have to act on that admission.
Well, you weren't there. So your eyes are utterly useless. And you choose to shut off the portion of your brain that considers one of our most basic of rights in this country. Kudos.
 
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The reason the DUI case can't be proven is that he fled the scene to avoid being tested. Which last I saw was a crime. So people are using the consequence of his crime to give him the benefit of the doubt about DUI. Interesting moral logic. Just looks like consciousness of guilt to me.

But, hey. A winning basketball season covers a multitude of sins.
I'm pretty sure it's only a crime if you refuse a field sobriety test. The cop smelling alcohol isn't a basis for charging him on those grounds.
 

CL82

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I'm not a child to be taken in by foolish deceptions. I'm not a defense lawyer bound to distort the truth in the interest of my client. I'm not a judge bound to apply the necessary presumptions of the court.
Was waiting for... "I'm just a troll that posts inflammatory stuff for attention."

#disappointing
 
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I'm not a child to be taken in by foolish deceptions. I'm not a defense lawyer bound to distort the truth in the interest of my client. I'm not a judge bound to apply the necessary presumptions of the court. I can use my eyes and my brain. People run from the cops when they think they are going to get hooked up. You don't get cuffed for an accident. You do get cuffed when the accident occurs under the influence. He ran. He knew.

In fact everyone reading this threads knows. But many don't want to admit it because then they would have to act on that admission.
Can you be more melodramatic? Is that possible? God what a dumb thread.
 

MattMang23

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Yes, he has been appropriately charged. But the reason he has been appropriately charged is that in a very real sense he beat the system. He evaded arrest so he could sober up. He shouldn't get credit for that decision. However a lot of people on this board are giving him credit for that decision because it means they have enough credible deniability to let him play basketball.

Think about what this board would be saying if it was a Louisville BB player in this circumstance.
You’re assuming all those things about beating the system and sobering up. You might be right, and I understand you’re drawing that conclusion based on the statement that the police officer smelled alcohol emanating from his person. But we don’t know for a fact he was DUI. I just think it’s a little dangerous to make the next leap and speak in absolutes. A lot of people here are conflating the “if there’s smoke there’s fire” theory with facts we know.
 
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You’re assuming all those things about beating the system and sobering up. You might be right, and I understand you’re drawing that conclusion based on the statement that the police officer smelled alcohol emanating from his person. But we don’t know for a fact he was DUI. I just think it’s a little dangerous to make the next leap and speak in absolutes. A lot of people here are conflating the “if there’s smoke there’s fire” theory with facts we know.
I'm basing it on the totally of factual events reported about the event that night. They all lead to one inexorable conclusion. Will it ever be proved in court? No. Because he ran away from the scene. He showed consciousness of guilt by running away from the scene. He manifestly commited a crime to avoid a more serious charge and a few people on this thread have said "Man, that was really smart of him. DUI is a much more serious charge."

You tell me. What reasonable doubt should I possess. Because I don't see any.
 
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I'm not a child to be taken in by foolish deceptions. I'm not a defense lawyer bound to distort the truth in the interest of my client. I'm not a judge bound to apply the necessary presumptions of the court. I can use my eyes and my brain. People run from the cops when they think they are going to get hooked up. You don't get cuffed for an accident. You do get cuffed when the accident occurs under the influence. He ran. He knew.

In fact everyone reading this threads knows. But many don't want to admit it because then they would have to act on that admission.
Don't get dizzy up on that lofty perch. Lawyers do not distort truth they advocate their client's position. Judges apply presumptions because said presumptions are set forth in the Constitution of our wonderful nation. People run from cops because they make a quick and unwise decision very similar to a series of unwise decisions most kids (including me) make as part of the growing up process.
 

MattMang23

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I'm basing it on the totally of factual events reported about the event that night. They all lead to one inexorable conclusion. Will it ever be proved in court? No. Because he ran away from the scene. He showed consciousness of guilt by running away from the scene. He manifestly commited a crime to avoid a more serious charge and a few people on this thread have said "Man, that was really smart of him. DUI is a much more serious charge."

You tell me. What reasonable doubt should I possess. Because I don't see any.
The only factual events reported are that he was speeding, he hit a sign, he said he didn’t have ID, an odor of alcohol was emanating from his person, and he fled the scene.

Did it ever occur to any of you investigators that perhaps a drink was spilled on him?

You- and you’re not the only one- have decided that you are entitled to patchwork the facts together to form a *possibly accurate* version of events and then tell us that that’s what happened.
 

arch

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You think that a guy who crashes a car into another car and then a sign at 1:30 am after drinking at Ted's with friends who were too inebriated to remember the details, and who smelled of alcohol according to the cop who came to the scene of the accident, is so likely to have been sober that it's ridiculous to suppose he might have been inebriated?
I think he was the “designated driver”.
No I don’t.
 
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Any decent lawyer could make a strong argument that

Cop smelled booze because he drove drunk girl and friends home. So he stopped someone drunk from driving

He ran because he’s not a licensed driver and got scared

Hitting sign because he doesn’t know how to drive not because he’s drunk
 

Husky25

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Any decent lawyer could make a strong argument that

Cop smelled booze because he drove drunk girl and friends home. So he stopped someone drunk from driving

He ran because he’s not a licensed driver and got scared

Hitting sign because he doesn’t know how to drive not because he’s drunk
Any right-minded person could make the argument that they are not going to address a non-issue.
 

fleudslipcon

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As a moderator I vote to keep this thread going. It demonstrates why we should be concerned about democracy.

Anyone else grateful this in not a KO player. Not saying this to defend KO. Only because it’s nice to not go backwards.

Love the football fans trolling although I’m sure not as much as Syracuse fans.

I’ve expressed my opinion early in this thread. As much as I believe in my intelligence I know it’s dumb convincing entrenched people from changing their minds. Seems the gods have found a number of modern day Prometheus.

Signing off before boss questions what I’m doing.
 
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