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OT: Best scrambled eggs - your recipe or eating out

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Dove

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I'm an over easy guy and that's how I make eggs and order them out 90% of the time. But I made some scrambled eggs yesterday that were exquisite.

As I mentioned in the "addictive YT" thread a few days ago, at the end of a "Hot Ones" episode with Gordon Ramsey, Evans asked him to make scrambled eggs. And I was intrigued. First off, Ramsey didn't beat the eggs prior to putting them in the pan (in fact, he used a pot). He just cracked the eggs into the pot, then started moving them around with a heat-proof spatula. He took it off the heat several times to ensure they didn't cook too quickly. He cautioned to not season the eggs until they were set as that would affect the cooking. And he added creme fraiche instead of something like milk, sour cream or cream cheese. Chives and seasoning were added at the end. They looked exquisite.

So yesterday I decided to experiment. I didn't have any creme fraiche lying around and didn't want to use sour cream. But I had full fat ricotta. And we've got a bunch of chives growing - and what the hell do you use them for except eggs, baked potatoes and fish? So I took out a pot, cracked six eggs into it and went about doing my best imitation of what Ramsay did. So a handful of chives got chopped up.

Result was the best scrambled eggs either I or my wife have ever had. I wouldn't throw hot sauce on the eggs, but I made some hash browns for a hot sauce sponge and served up with some fried kielbasa.

Other than free hotel breakfast buffets, I have pretty much shunned scrambled eggs for years. But this was an epiphany. And while I'm totally satisfied with the results I got with this recipe, I'm wondering if any of y'all have tricks to up my scrambled egg game even further.
He did this on MasterChef one time. Maybe you can Bing it.
 
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HuskyHawk

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I'm an over easy guy and that's how I make eggs and order them out 90% of the time. But I made some scrambled eggs yesterday that were exquisite.

As I mentioned in the "addictive YT" thread a few days ago, at the end of a "Hot Ones" episode with Gordon Ramsey, Evans asked him to make scrambled eggs. And I was intrigued. First off, Ramsey didn't beat the eggs prior to putting them in the pan (in fact, he used a pot). He just cracked the eggs into the pot, then started moving them around with a heat-proof spatula. He took it off the heat several times to ensure they didn't cook too quickly. He cautioned to not season the eggs until they were set as that would affect the cooking. And he added creme fraiche instead of something like milk, sour cream or cream cheese. Chives and seasoning were added at the end. They looked exquisite.

So yesterday I decided to experiment. I didn't have any creme fraiche lying around and didn't want to use sour cream. But I had full fat ricotta. And we've got a bunch of chives growing - and what the hell do you use them for except eggs, baked potatoes and fish? So I took out a pot, cracked six eggs into it and went about doing my best imitation of what Ramsay did. So a handful of chives got chopped up.

Result was the best scrambled eggs either I or my wife have ever had. I wouldn't throw hot sauce on the eggs, but I made some hash browns for a hot sauce sponge and served up with some fried kielbasa.

Other than free hotel breakfast buffets, I have pretty much shunned scrambled eggs for years. But this was an epiphany. And while I'm totally satisfied with the results I got with this recipe, I'm wondering if any of y'all have tricks to up my scrambled egg game even further.
The heat is really the key. I do scramble them before they hit the pan, but you don't have to. You do need to keep stirring and fluffing them as the cook...slowly. This is true for omelets as well, although you need to stop stirring when it is time to add the ingredients.

I'm a scrambled egg guy. I don't like eggs any other way. Have not tried ricotta, but I find goat cheese crumbles works nicely.
 

Dove

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Any toddler can make scrambled eggs.

My step-mother used to make them for dinner occasionally, with chopped up hot dogs. Didn’t love it, but it was better than Hamburger Helper night. Which was better than Tuna Helper night.

I’m also over easy 90% of the time. If am scrambling, it’s for an omelet, which is a whole ‘nother thing.

I did learn a lot about making omelets. Using water instead of milk was an epiphany. Learned that while participating in a demo at the Big E around 30 years ago. Tilting the pan, too.

Ever whip the ricotta and serve with meatballs over a nice green salad, O&V?
This thread is about scrambled eggs.
 
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My scrambled eggs are always soft, and you could eat a half dozen in one setting very easily.

I add a lot of cream/milk in the bowl with cracked eggs. I never crack the yolk in the bowl, only in the pan. We have a glass top stove, which I really don't like. I feel my cast iron pan always made better eggs.

Butter (lots of it), low heat (I actually remove them from stovetop well before finished) the put back on for short periods. Continual stirring using a spatula (lightly). I season them near the end with salt/pepper. Sometimes it can take 15 minutes or more from start to plate.

Eggs end up very fluffy, soft and fully cooked.

I'll admit for many years I cooked them hard (pancake style) but I have converted to the fluffy method.

Lastly, someone mentioned hotdogs. When I was on Atkins, I would add a couple of cooked and sliced hotdogs to the eggs for a full meal. Would also add smoked cheese.

Anyway this is what I like to achieve:

1595861222578.png
 

storrsroars

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maybe for a frittata.
I use cast iron for everything, and for frittatas you cant use anything else, but when Im cooking any type of egg whether over easy, scrambled or omelettes you gotta pull out the non-stick cookwear.
I'd agree, but with a caveat - a perfectly seasoned cast iron pan with no hot spots can do the job. We had a small one at my late mom's house I wish I kept. Of the three cast iron pans she had, this was the only one that nothing stuck to. As good as any non-stick pan I've used, although not an ideal shape or size for omelets.
 

storrsroars

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Im not a scamble guy either, (over easy or poached, which is another really hard thing to get right) but enjoy them from time to time. I think the part I bolded from your post, no matter the method or ingredient additions is the key.

People cook them too hot.

Just like a perfect omelette. You cannot cook it too hot OR too low. There is a very narrow temp sweet spot for the eggs to set right but not brown.
Especially omelettes that you are filling. If you want to keep them yellow with no brown but have it cooked all the way and perfectly folded, the most important thing by far is temp management.
The funny thing is, I've rarely had issues with omelets, which were about the first things I ever learned to cook as a kid. I've always had the pan off heat and tiltled when working the edges, but for whatever reason never did that with scrambled, Still, I think what I really liked about the Ramsay method was the large fluffy curds that you'd really only get by not whisking the eggs in advance.
 

storrsroars

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He did this on MasterChef one time. Maybe you can Bing it.
I don't Bing.
As mentioned in the OP, I saw him do it on video. And then I linked another video of him upthread.
Maybe you can Bing that :eek:
 
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I'm an over easy guy and that's how I make eggs and order them out 90% of the time. But I made some scrambled eggs yesterday that were exquisite.

As I mentioned in the "addictive YT" thread a few days ago, at the end of a "Hot Ones" episode with Gordon Ramsey, Evans asked him to make scrambled eggs. And I was intrigued. First off, Ramsey didn't beat the eggs prior to putting them in the pan (in fact, he used a pot). He just cracked the eggs into the pot, then started moving them around with a heat-proof spatula. He took it off the heat several times to ensure they didn't cook too quickly. He cautioned to not season the eggs until they were set as that would affect the cooking. And he added creme fraiche instead of something like milk, sour cream or cream cheese. Chives and seasoning were added at the end. They looked exquisite.

So yesterday I decided to experiment. I didn't have any creme fraiche lying around and didn't want to use sour cream. But I had full fat ricotta.
I tried a version of your eggs today. Excellent.

I put a little twist on them. I started with olive oil, onions, and added some Hungarian wax peppers that I had already cooked in oil.

With the onions ready, I added the eggs whole with generous butter and cooked them Ramsey method. I used ricotta as it was on hand, instead of the creme fraiche. Salt and pepper, no chives. Served with toasted baguette.

The ricotta caught my eye in your recipe. Always love ricotta. This was very good. I often cook my eggs this way except I usually use Provolone which is always in the fridge. Your ricotta substitute is better.

Try a lasagne soup recipe with ricotta!
 
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Any toddler can make scrambled eggs.

My step-mother used to make them for dinner occasionally, with chopped up hot dogs. Didn’t love it, but it was better than Hamburger Helper night. Which was better than Tuna Helper night.

I’m also over easy 90% of the time. If am scrambling, it’s for an omelet, which is a whole ‘nother thing.

I did learn a lot about making omelets. Using water instead of milk was an epiphany. Learned that while participating in a demo at the Big E around 30 years ago. Tilting the pan, too.

Ever whip the ricotta and serve with meatballs over a nice green salad, O&V?
I always put ricotta in my meatballs and add a dollop in my sauce.
 
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The best scrambled eggs are the ones never made. Scrambled eggs suck. Eggs suck, unless you're smoking pork inside.
Its personal - with food. But, if you are not smoking meats - twice a week... you are committing a crime. Just my opinion... chicken, pork or beef - also veggies. Get an electric smoker (temper control is everything with proteins) - so simple - anyone can do it.

Scrambled eggs (again ver personal) but... butter, a touch of heavy cream, finely diced peppers, onions and smoked ham. Grate in some Asiago cheese - and finish with Asiago cheese after plating. Whisk eggs - turn them little to sparingly with a spatula. Enjoy
 
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I always put ricotta in my meatballs and add a dollop in my sauce.
Before I make the egg, I put high grade olio2go brand olive oil in the pan so it fills the pan, and I heat it on medium for a few minutes until the olive oil starts to sizzle.

While I am waiting for the oil to sizzle:

I beat up a jumbo egg in a bowl.This is for one person, but you can add more eggs for more than one person

I add a little Simply Organic non-alcohol vanilla flavoring which you can order from
vitacost. com. It is expensive but it is great tasting. BTW, you can put in on a sweet potato, yogurt, veggies, etc.

I put a square or 2 of Ghirardelli intense dark chocolate in the batter (the lower the cacao content the better the flavor) The absolute tastiest in Belgian chocolate thought. When the omelet is done, the chocolate gives it a great taste.

I may add a few blueberries to the batter. Sort of like the blueberry pancake concept. They soften and taste good.

I add hemp hearts which has a lot of protein and fills out the omelet.

I add Oatsome oat milk or any other oat milk. This gives the omelet taste and more liquid. You could add regular milk if your prefer.

Sometimes, I have added a little Rubenstein canned salmon to the batter. Rubenstein is the best brand by a mile.

I am sure cheese would be okay added in.

Now, the pan should be sizzling, and I add the batter..

Once on the plate, I add some salt, and put balsamic glaze on the omelet. This is balsamic vinegar with grape must, and it has a nice sweet and sour taste.

It really has a unique taste. Others who I have made it for, say they like it.

Bon apetit.
 

storrsroars

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Ever whip the ricotta and serve with meatballs over a nice green salad, O&V?
Tonight's dinner. I had defrosted a lb of ground meat but didn't feel like burgers. Since you didn't specify a recipe, I just ad libbed. Ricotta with a bit of lemon and pepper, ricotta meatballs, simple arugula/spinach salad, pomegranate vinegar and evoo.

Not bad. Wife approves too.

meatballsalad.JPG
 

Chin Diesel

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Tonight's dinner. I had defrosted a lb of ground meat but didn't feel like burgers. Since you didn't specify a recipe, I just ad libbed. Ricotta with a bit of lemon and pepper, ricotta meatballs, simple arugula/spinach salad, pomegranate vinegar and evoo.

Not bad. Wife approves too.

View attachment 57032
Looking sharp.
 

8893

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Tonight's dinner. I had defrosted a lb of ground meat but didn't feel like burgers. Since you didn't specify a recipe, I just ad libbed. Ricotta with a bit of lemon and pepper, ricotta meatballs, simple arugula/spinach salad, pomegranate vinegar and evoo.

Not bad. Wife approves too.

View attachment 57032
Nice!

It‘s always an ad-lib for me; there is no recipe. The local pizza joint makes a great app with four house-made meatballs and their whipped ricotta. I get their garden salad, which looks a lot like that, and combine the two.

Meatball salad has been a staple of mine since I worked at Fortuna’s when I was in high school. I used to make it for my shift meal. I love meatball grinders but I don’t love the way they make me feel after I eat them. I noticed that I felt a lot better when I lost the bread, and the meatballs are a great protein to add to a good salad.

Decades later I started to see it on restaurant menus, but with iceberg lettuce, which I try to avoid. I’ve found a few places that will do a nice off-menu version, but I mostly get it at an Italian market and deli where they have a well-stocked salad bar and you tell them what you want. I have them add two to three meatballs at the end. Every time I check out, the women manning the cash register tell me how much they love meatball salad.
 
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Good timing here, I was in the mood this morning for something different than the usual bowl of flakes. Historically, I've just cracked some eggs in a bowl, added some milk, cream, half-n-half, whatever is around. Throw in a little salt and pepper and whisked the heck out of it. Then cooked it fast. It was fine.

Many years ago I had brunch at a restaurant in San Francisco called Postrio. I had scrambled eggs with chives, mascarpone and lobster. The best eggs I ever had. Attempts to recreate this at home weren't remotely successful.

This "Ramsey Method" shed a lot of light on things. I happened to have all the ingredients required. Fresh chives from the garden and whole milk ricotta instead of creme fraiche. I only had grocery store eggs and butter but in the future there are plenty of little farms around me with fresh eggs.

I cooked them as described in the video and this thread and they were the best scrambled eggs I have ever made. Creamy and delicious. Next time I will upgrade with the local eggs and Irish butter but this was already way better than what I was doing. I have been more of an over easy guy as well but maybe because I was making such crappy scrambled eggs all these years. I will make my eggs this way more often now.

I used a cast iron skillet which seemed to do a nice job of retaining heat as it was taken on and off the heat. During cleaning there was a very thin layer of cooked egg that took a little effort to remove but not that big of a deal.
 

nomar

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I'm an over easy guy and that's how I make eggs and order them out 90% of the time. But I made some scrambled eggs yesterday that were exquisite.

As I mentioned in the "addictive YT" thread a few days ago, at the end of a "Hot Ones" episode with Gordon Ramsey, Evans asked him to make scrambled eggs. And I was intrigued. First off, Ramsey didn't beat the eggs prior to putting them in the pan (in fact, he used a pot). He just cracked the eggs into the pot, then started moving them around with a heat-proof spatula. He took it off the heat several times to ensure they didn't cook too quickly. He cautioned to not season the eggs until they were set as that would affect the cooking. And he added creme fraiche instead of something like milk, sour cream or cream cheese. Chives and seasoning were added at the end. They looked exquisite.

So yesterday I decided to experiment. I didn't have any creme fraiche lying around and didn't want to use sour cream. But I had full fat ricotta. And we've got a bunch of chives growing - and what the hell do you use them for except eggs, baked potatoes and fish? So I took out a pot, cracked six eggs into it and went about doing my best imitation of what Ramsay did. So a handful of chives got chopped up.

Result was the best scrambled eggs either I or my wife have ever had. I wouldn't throw hot sauce on the eggs, but I made some hash browns for a hot sauce sponge and served up with some fried kielbasa.

Other than free hotel breakfast buffets, I have pretty much shunned scrambled eggs for years. But this was an epiphany. And while I'm totally satisfied with the results I got with this recipe, I'm wondering if any of y'all have tricks to up my scrambled egg game even further.
Ha, I saw the Hot Ones thing too, and started scrambling the eggs in the pan. I like the results.

He's totally wrong about the seasoning needing to be done at the end. Some chefs swear the opposite. But I've done it both ways, repeatedly; there's no difference.

Until I was in my 30s, good scrambled eggs were pretty much the only thing I could make well.
 

nomar

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Good eggs make such a difference. My wife gets them from a woman she works with who has chickens and they are awesome.
I was in Ireland a few years ago. We had an AirBnB and cooked breakfast a couple times. When we cracked the eggs open they were a deep orange. The taste was markedly better there -- not just when we cooked but whenever we ate eggs at a hotel or restaurant.
 

8893

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I was in Ireland a few years ago. We had an AirBnB and cooked breakfast a couple times. When we cracked the eggs open they were a deep orange. The taste was markedly better there -- not just when we cooked but whenever we ate eggs at a hotel or restaurant.
We were also there a few years ago. Stayed in B&Bs the whole time. Full Irish breakfast every day.

Best. Breakfasts. Ever. Even the blood pudding, which the hostesses always made me eat.

Agreed on the deep orange yolks. Those are always the best of the ones we get from my wife's co-worker, too.
 

storrsroars

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We were also there a few years ago. Stayed in B&Bs the whole time. Full Irish breakfast every day.

Best. Breakfasts. Ever. Even the blood pudding, which the hostesses always made me eat.

Agreed on the deep orange yolks. Those are always the best of the ones we get from my wife's co-worker, too.
In Scotland, they had the decency to call it "black" pudding.

Thankfully, when I was there, I was doing a ton of walking every day. Not a breakfast that sits lightly in one's gut. But it was delicious. Typically 2 eggs, two bangers, two rashers, a slice each of lorne sausage and black pudding, 2 slices tomato, 2-3 cooked whole white mushrooms, a side of baked beans, and toast. With lousy coffee.
 
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I was in Ireland a few years ago. We had an AirBnB and cooked breakfast a couple times. When we cracked the eggs open they were a deep orange. The taste was markedly better there -- not just when we cooked but whenever we ate eggs at a hotel or restaurant.
Pete & Gerry's (New Hampshire) eggs often have that really deep orange. If you see them in your local grocery store, try them. They buy from a consortium of organic/free range farmers. (Nellie's is another affiliated brand, probably the same eggs) Delicious. I get them in Florida and they are still shockingly fresh.
 

storrsroars

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Pete & Gerry's (New Hampshire) eggs often have that really deep orange. If you see them in your local grocery store, try them. They buy from a consortium of organic/free range farmers. (Nellie's is another affiliated brand, probably the same eggs) Delicious. I get them and Florida and they are still shockingly fresh.
We have both brands here in Pgh. Typically $5.99/doz vs $1.69 for "regular" large eggs. Local farmer's market eggs are usually around $6/doz, but they're like the first thing that sells out at pretty much every market, so have to get there early.
 

8893

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In Scotland, they had the decency to call it "black" pudding.
I could be conflating blood sausage and black pudding, which I *think* are the same--or at least the latter is made from the former. All I know is that there was no saying "no" for me. These women were very forceful. My wife and kids were horrified and wouldn't touch it, but the hostess invariably put it only on my plate and insisted that I try hers. I was always a little afraid, and then pleasantly surprised.
 

8893

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We have both brands here in Pgh. Typically $5.99/doz vs $1.69 for "regular" large eggs. Local farmer's market eggs are usually around $6/doz, but they're like the first thing that sells out at pretty much every market, so have to get there early.
The co-worker from whom my wife buys them was only asking $3 per dozen, but my wife apparently loves to give away money and told her that she wasn't charging enough, so they are $5 per dozen.
 

storrsroars

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I could be conflating blood sausage and black pudding, which I *think* are the same--or at least the latter is made from the former. All I know is that there was no saying "no" for me. These women were very forceful. My wife and kids were horrified and wouldn't touch it, but the hostess invariably put it only on my plate and insisted that I try hers. I was always a little afraid, and then pleasantly surprised.
Yeah, it's the same thing. My recollection was not offensive, but not something I'd seek out. With everything else on the plate, I didn't really notice it.

As an aside, I actually enjoyed my first encounter with haggis, tatties and neeps. But that wore off after a second try.

You know, if we only ever talked about food, we might get along :D
 

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