Uconn expecting a $50 million deficit

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dennismenace

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Hmmmm. This just happens to be the annual Hartford bailout enshrined in the budget for the next 20 years. What a coincidence!!!!

 
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Hmmmm. This just happens to be the annual Hartford bailout enshrined in the budget for the next 20 years. What a coincidence!!!!

That's a really low number, so it's surprising.

This fall is going to be a total disaster.

Now that we have a preview of what schools expect, it's certainly all going to go wrong.
 
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not likely that state employees forgo scheduled 3.5% raises.
Within most of these contracts there are possibilities for mass furloughs, which is a lost scheduled raise in effect, though there is language sometimes that this might be made up in future years. UConn gets 3.5% raises? Wow. The government worker standard in most states including New York is 1.5 to 2%.
 

UC313

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A cursory search showed a 1.46 billion budget for Storrs. 50 mil is like .4%. Provided my math doesnt suck. Which it might.
 
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A cursory search showed a 1.46 billion budget for Storrs. 50 mil is like .4%. Provided my math doesnt suck. Which it might.
It does, or you left off the 3 before the 4 when you typed it.
It's actually 3.4%, but who's counting?
 
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When you giveaway free tuition like the Fed is giving away free USD to everyone then yes we are not going to have a balanced budget. Only difference between UCONN and the Fed/USA is the US can print its own money and get out of any jam. They are only going to jack up tuition more on students who actually earned their way in.
 
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When you giveaway free tuition like the Fed is giving away free USD to everyone then yes we are not going to have a balanced budget. .... They are only going to jack up tuition more on students who actually earned their way in.
What the hell does that mean?

You assume students on financial aid have lower scores than those who pay full freight?

It's the exact opposite of that.

Study after study has shown this.
 
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I read that post aloud and my dog went crazy.
LOL!!!

Seriously though, I know people whose entire job is trying to reach out to inner city kids who are routed to community colleges by the prevailing culture in urban public schools. He tells me that a significant chunk of these kids have higher grades and SAT scores than our average incoming student at our top 40 public.
 

CL82

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LOL!!!

Seriously though, I know people whose entire job is trying to reach out to inner city kids who are routed to community colleges by the prevailing culture in urban public schools. He tells me that a significant chunk of these kids have higher grades and SAT scores than our average incoming student at our top 40 public.
Unless you are getting a full ride going to a decent CC makes a lot sense. I think more families should think hard about it. (Of course I didn't do this with my kids, but everyone else should do it... Seriously though, when I hear about the debt that some kids come out of school with, I think they really should have utilized this option.)
 
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Unless you are getting a full ride going to a decent CC makes a lot sense. I think more families should think hard about it. (Of course I didn't do this with my kids, but everyone else should do it... Seriously though, when I hear about the debt that some kids come out of school with, I think they really should have utilized this option.)
It's a very bad idea for kids who should otherwise be at a university. I can't tell how much wasted time and money is spent there for these students, who need to complete a lot of extra work and do catchup once they go to a 4 year school. In my state, college is free for most kids. But this is besides the point of the original discusion. I'm only pointing out that kids on scholarship typically have higher grades and SAT scores than those who pay full freight. It's just the way it is.

One way to signal to an admissions committee that you're going to pay the tuition in full is to not submit a FAFSA to them.

This is an experiment that will cost you the $100 application fee, but submit a FAFSA to 9 schools that might admit you and give you money. Then submit an app to a school without a FAFSA, and make sure that this school typically only admits students with higher GPAS and at least 100 points higher on the SAT. See what happens.
 

CL82

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It's a very bad idea for kids who should otherwise be at a university. I can't tell how much wasted time and money is spent there for these students, who need to complete a lot of extra work and do catchup once they go to a 4 year school. In my state, college is free for most kids. But this is besides the point of the original discusion. I'm only pointing out that kids on scholarship typically have higher grades and SAT scores than those who pay full freight. It's just the way it is.

One way to signal to an admissions committee that you're going to pay the tuition in full is to not submit a FAFSA to them.

This is an experiment that will cost you the $100 application fee, but submit a FAFSA to 9 schools that might admit you and give you money. Then submit an app to a school without a FAFSA, and make sure that this school typically only admits students with higher GPAS and at least 100 points higher on the SAT. See what happens.
New Jersey offers the NJ Stars program for higher achieving kids. They can go to a CC for two years free and then they are guaranteed admission to a state school, including Rutgers, also free of charge for their final two years. That's a bachelors degree from a quality college at no cost. To me, that makes far, far more sense than having kids take out huge loans. I agree if you are getting a full ride, skip the community college and go straight to the school of your choice. My circumstances are a little different because my one of kids was a D1 athlete and I have the resources to pay the difference for the other (who got merit scholarships). For those who don't, I think it is crazy not to take advantage of a free education.
 
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HuskyHawk

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It's a very bad idea for kids who should otherwise be at a university. I can't tell how much wasted time and money is spent there for these students, who need to complete a lot of extra work and do catchup once they go to a 4 year school. In my state, college is free for most kids. But this is besides the point of the original discusion. I'm only pointing out that kids on scholarship typically have higher grades and SAT scores than those who pay full freight. It's just the way it is.

One way to signal to an admissions committee that you're going to pay the tuition in full is to not submit a FAFSA to them.

This is an experiment that will cost you the $100 application fee, but submit a FAFSA to 9 schools that might admit you and give you money. Then submit an app to a school without a FAFSA, and make sure that this school typically only admits students with higher GPAS and at least 100 points higher on the SAT. See what happens.
I've heard this from others. I am not going to get any aid for my daughter. She might get a merit award from some schools (although I wonder if those will continue to be available next year).

Better to submit the FAFSA or not? Or maybe to submit it to a school where we'd hope for merit (and expect an acceptance) and not to a reach school?
 
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LOL!!!

Seriously though, I know people whose entire job is trying to reach out to inner city kids who are routed to community colleges by the prevailing culture in urban public schools. He tells me that a significant chunk of these kids have higher grades and SAT scores than our average incoming student at our top 40 public.
Nonsense
 
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I've heard this from others. I am not going to get any aid for my daughter. She might get a merit award from some schools (although I wonder if those will continue to be available next year).

Better to submit the FAFSA or not? Or maybe to submit it to a school where we'd hope for merit (and expect an acceptance) and not to a reach school?
If you don't submit a FAFSA you don't get any aid or scholarship.
 
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Unless you are getting a full ride going to a decent CC makes a lot sense. I think more families should think hard about it. (Of course I didn't do this with my kids, but everyone else should do it... Seriously though, when I hear about the debt that some kids come out of school with, I think they really should have utilized this option.)
What we're seeing from those who come over with CC experience is needing to go 5 years or even more to complete requirements.

The modern university is not like the one we all went to (those who are over 30). There are few electives, and a lot more requirements to complete a major. At our institution, those in the sciences or engineering hardly step foot in the Humanities or Arts. So they show up and realize they need to complete yet another 3 or 4 years at least.
 

krinklecut

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When you giveaway free tuition like the Fed is giving away free USD to everyone then yes we are not going to have a balanced budget. Only difference between UCONN and the Fed/USA is the US can print its own money and get out of any jam. They are only going to jack up tuition more on students who actually earned their way in.
yup rich people are just smarter, it's science!

man, if these kids who "earn their way in" are worried about it, they should apply for some scholarships. since they have so much merit and all.
 

HuskyHawk

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If you don't submit a FAFSA you don't get any aid or scholarship.
So from a strategy point of view, if I think she'd potentially get a merit scholarship at UVM, I should send them a FAFSA. If I think she's a reach to be admitted, at say Tufts, with no chance of a scholarship, I should have her apply with no FAFSA.
 
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So from a strategy point of view, if I think she'd potentially get a merit scholarship at UVM, I should send them a FAFSA. If I think she's a reach to be admitted, at say Tufts, with no chance of a scholarship, I should have her apply with no FAFSA.
Yes, exactly.
 

CL82

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What we're seeing from those who come over with CC experience is needing to go 5 years or even more to complete requirements.

The modern university is not like the one we all went to (those who are over 30). There are few electives, and a lot more requirements to complete a major. At our institution, those in the sciences or engineering hardly step foot in the Humanities or Arts. So they show up and realize they need to complete yet another 3 or 4 years at least.
I guess it depends on the kid and on the CC. The kids who participate in the NJ Stars programs are successful in completing their degrees in 4 years from what little I've read on it. Up to 60 credits are transferable from the CC. Plus, as you can see from the link my post above, they have to take college credit courses in HS and have to be a top 15% in their graduating class. These are intelligent motivated kids who are making a very intelligent choice as to how to pursue their higher education.
 
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It's not even July yet and it's already becoming increasingly clear that universities and states will not have a handle on things come September. Many universities are right now experiencing a revolt from faculty and workers. Just as an anecdote: the common wisdom has been that parents and students want to return to campus in the fall (and to the petri-dish dorms) BUT, my classes have already been switched from in person to online for the fall. AFTER they were switched over a week ago, students started to pour in and enroll. I don't know why--it could be a variety of reasons, but I would not automatically assume that students want in person classes during a pandemic. I went from 30 enrollees to just over 40 for what is ostensibly supposed to be a small seminar with a 35 person cap (I long ago waived caps for my courses).
 

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