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OT: Question for anyone who has gone solar

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Think of it like buying a house. Once you buy the house your mortgage payment is fixed for 30 years while if you had continued to rent it's highly likely your rent would have increased. Unless you easily have the cash available buy (don't rent) a system and finance it for 10-20 years. Example:

Old electric bill = $200
New loan payment = $160

Where I live the electric company openly states that we should expect the cost of power to rise 6% each year. If that's the case the $200 monthly bill in 10 years is ~$350 and in 15 years it's ~$500.

You'll also get a 26% tax credit which I believe goes down after this year.
 
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Ah, gotcha on the name! We have a Pleasure Way Plateau and it came with 2 Eco Ion 100 AH LifeP204 batteries. We also have 2 95 watt solar panels. We're still fairly new to the RV and I'm still not quite sure what all the numbers mean in real life, but we didn't have any issue with running out on a 24 day cross country (and back) trip this summer. We do have a battery turn off switch which helps conserve the batteries and our dometic fridge runs on propane.

We debated storing the RV on my business parking lot (I own the building) but found an indoor heated storage place in Belmont NH - (we have a family place up on Lake WInnipesaukee), so I don't even have to winterize it. We will have to run up and start the generator and drive around for an hour a month!
That's sweet! 2 95 watt panels seems low, but it works for you! I would recommend, regardless of where you store it to open the hot water valves and drain the water. I found out the hard way on my Camper (my 26 foot tow behind) when my hot water tank exploded and cost me $900... Ug. I use the Transit all winter, so that helps, but haven't used the camper in over a year. Would love to add solar to that too, as we only have 1 100w battery (amg) and it runs out quickly.
 
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I had a friend who sold solar panels and I learned that very few homes are great candidates in New England due to trees, shade etc.
The lone positive to come out of Isaias and a tornado slamming my neighborhood in the last month is that everyone in the area is now cleared to get solar panels. :eek:
 
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Going net neutral is a nice goal if you can afford it (it's a long road to break-even). Part of the equation has to be whether you want to make the investment to do your small part in helping the environment. Plus, if you wanted to go down the route of buying electric cars as they become more common...
 

Drumguy

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That's sweet! 2 95 watt panels seems low, but it works for you! I would recommend, regardless of where you store it to open the hot water valves and drain the water. I found out the hard way on my Camper (my 26 foot tow behind) when my hot water tank exploded and cost me $900... Ug. I use the Transit all winter, so that helps, but haven't used the camper in over a year. Would love to add solar to that too, as we only have 1 100w battery (amg) and it runs out quickly.
WiIl do on draining the lines - I've just started going over the winterization instructions. Thee things are actually far more complicated than I ever thought. They do now allow another panel but I'm not convinced it's worth it for the 5-6 days/year we'll dry camp.
 
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WIl do on draining he lines - I've just started going over the winterization instructions. Thee things are actually far more complicated than I ever thought. They do now allow another panel but I'm not convinced it's worth it for the 5-6 days/year we'll dry camp.
Yeah, if you only go dry every so often, probably not. We use our van almost every weekend. We like to go see bands and have drinks, and I don't drive after even one drink, so we end up stealth camping after the show till morning. We've gone to NH and the cape each of the last 5 weekends, plus local. When you don't have to worry about a hotel, distance isn't much of a hindrance any longer. It's been really cool. Boston too, its super easy to stealth camp there too.
 

Drumguy

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Yeah, if you only go dry every so often, probably not. We use our van almost every weekend. We like to go see bands and have drinks, and I don't drive after even one drink, so we end up stealth camping after the show till morning. We've gone to NH and the cape each of the last 5 weekends, plus local. When you don't have to worry about a hotel, distance isn't much of a hindrance any longer. It's been really cool. Boston too, its super easy to stealth camp there too.
That's pretty great! We want to get to that stage as well but we do have this place up in NH! We're headed up there this weekend in the RV with a short trip over to Burlington and hopefully pick up some Heady Topper and Foam. Visit our old stomping grounds - I was living in Burlington when Ben & Jerry started their shop.
 
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1. My sixteen solar panels are capable of providing of providing about 1/3 of my energy needs.
2. My utility pays me 15 cents per kilowatt hour for the electricity I produce while I pay 11 cents a kilowatt hour for the electricity I use.
3. The savings are considerable in summer as opposed to winter.
4. You get a 30 per cent federal tax credit for solar installation. For me that meant paying no federal income tax one year and about half what was expected the following year.
5. I figure it would take about 12 years to break even.

All in all, a good deal while reducing the carbon footprint.
 
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Is there anything to worry about with all those holes being put in your roof? I would imagine a bad installer might be really bad news.
That's why I didn't get solar.

One or a few improperly caulked holes and the roof leaks, and your ceiling, ,furniture , and carpet get ruined. $1000 deductible on homeowner's policy. Maybe, higher insurance premiums for a few years after that. Is the company responsible or will it go out of business in a few years?

Maybe you catch a break and their liability carrier pays and no out of pocket. Still you can't live in the house while the restoration is done.

On the other hand, you probably will save on the electric bills. If you are not a worrier type, then you take a chance.

How many years do they warranty their work for?
 

UCDaveD

Michael!
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Don’t know if it’s worth it, but solar salespeople keep showing up at my door during dinner time and I’m getting pissed. They’re pretty aggressive too.
 

UConnSwag11

Storrs, CT The Mecca
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... was it worth it?

Two years ago my electric bill was $50/month. With my adding mini splits for heat/air, it's now $200/month. With that in mind, I'm looking at solar as an option, and I'm looking for input from those who have gone solar.

How did it work out for you? Would you recommend solar to others? Things to consider?
Parents absolutely love it. Dramatically decreased their bill
 
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1. My sixteen solar panels are capable of providing of providing about 1/3 of my energy needs.
2. My utility pays me 15 cents per kilowatt hour for the electricity I produce while I pay 11 cents a kilowatt hour for the electricity I use.
3. The savings are considerable in summer as opposed to winter.
4. You get a 30 per cent federal tax credit for solar installation. For me that meant paying no federal income tax one year and about half what was expected the following year.
5. I figure it would take about 12 years to break even.

All in all, a good deal while reducing the carbon footprint.
For what it's worth, your personal carbon footprint is completely insignificant wrt the global ecosystem.
 
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1. My sixteen solar panels are capable of providing of providing about 1/3 of my energy needs.
2. My utility pays me 15 cents per kilowatt hour for the electricity I produce while I pay 11 cents a kilowatt hour for the electricity I use.
3. The savings are considerable in summer as opposed to winter.
4. You get a 30 per cent federal tax credit for solar installation. For me that meant paying no federal income tax one year and about half what was expected the following year.
5. I figure it would take about 12 years to break even.

All in all, a good deal while reducing the carbon footprint.
This all sounds good, but do you plan on staying there for the next 12 years or a substantial portion of them?

This reminds me of the argument for deferring the receipt of social security until a person is 70. The argument goes that your monthly receipt of payments will increase like maybe 25% more if you wait.

I figured it out and even took mine at age 65 rather than 66, to not have to wait 12 or 14 years to break even. I did the math so that is how I knew. Because, who knows about the future?

If you don't mind the upfront costs and hope to be living there for 12 years, barring unforeseen circumstances, and you are a younger person, the logic sounds good.
 
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The lone positive to come out of Isaias and a tornado slamming my neighborhood in the last month is that everyone in the area is now cleared to get solar panels. :eek:
Years ago, I talked to a guy at Home Depot from a solar company at his bench. He looked up my house on his laptop and said I would have to cut down a significant number of trees for solar to have any effect. At least he was honest about it.

Who wants to do that? Cut down the pine and maples? Forget about it. They provide shade for part of the day so I can sit outside or walk back and forth in my backyard for exercise.
 

temery

What?
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Got a crazy estimate of $48k. $15k is my top for a two br ranch.
 

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