Pres. Hetbst: UConn's APR for this year going to be in the high 900's | The Boneyard

Pres. Hetbst: UConn's APR for this year going to be in the high 900's

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This according to the Associated Press.

So far, if JCM left under the agreed terms, Chuck finishes his degree, is that the sun shining brightly at the entrance into gampel?

You've got to figure high 900's this year, next year should be even better. Just have to ride out the miles, darius smith, kelly, etc. deadweight and get the 4 year average up.
 

MTHusky

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Great news if it is true! Do you have a link to the AP report?
 

intlzncster

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What I hate about this article, and about the APR in general, is the impression it gives to people (especially in the media)-->that APR measures relative academic performance of universities. The article basically states that UConn is much worse academically than most other D1 programs. I don't think this reflects reality for many of the reasons stated in this thread and other places.
 
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But will they raise admissions requirements? Why not?
 
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How does one calculate this thing???
The APR is calculated as follows: Each student-athlete receiving athletically-related financial aid earns one retention point for staying in school and one eligibility point for being academically eligible. A teams total points are divided by points possible and then multiplied by one thousand to equal the teams Academic Progress Rate score.
 

Waquoit

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It's a stupid measure. Good to see that the new prez is willing to do what it takes to game the thing.
 

RS9999X

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Each student can earn 2 points a semester. 1 point for Retention and 1 for Academic Progress. 4 points a year per student

4 points a year x 13 scholarships = 52 possible points

Last year UConn had 10 scholarship players in the Fall and 11 in the Spring (Wolfe).

UConn could earn a possible 42 points. 20 in the fall and 22 in the Spring.

Coombs-McDaniel transferred in good standing. A transfer costs the schools 2 points if they aren't in good standing, 1 if they are in good standing and 0 if they are in good standing with a 2.6 GPA.

We'll assume they earned 41 of 42 and Coombs-McDaniels was in good standing but not a 2.6 student or better.

That works out to .9761 (x 1000) or 976.1. The NCAA rounds down so its a 976.

That's my best guess and assumes Michael Bradley was a non-counter and Donnell Beverly is in good order and Majok's sloppy hangover were not factors.
 
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Each student can earn 2 points a semester. 1 point for Retention and 1 for Academic Progress. 4 points a year per student

4 points a year x 13 scholarships = 52 possible points

Last year UConn had 10 scholarship players in the Fall and 11 in the Spring (Wolfe).

UConn could earn a possible 42 points. 20 in the fall and 22 in the Spring.

Coombs-McDaniel transferred in good standing. A transfer costs the schools 2 points if they aren't in good standing, 1 if they are in good standing and 0 if they are in good standing with a 2.6 GPA.

We'll assume they earned 41 of 42 and Coombs-McDaniels was in good standing but not a 2.6 student or better.

That works out to .9761 (x 1000) or 976.1. The NCAA rounds down so its a 976.

That's my best guess and assumes Michael Bradley was a non-counter and Donnell Beverly is in good order and Majok's sloppy hangover were not factors.

Does the possible points (42) limit UConn's ceiling? Are you saying that other schools with more scholarship players have higher ceilings? If that's true, it would make very little sense since schools are not compelled to maximize scholarships, and this measure would seem to require precisely that. Indeed, one might argue that a significant NCAA penalty (say, 2 or 3 scholarships) could drop the maximal score so low that a school would find it difficult to recover. As the school regained scholarships after probation, it would find itself running afoul of APR and losing scholarships because its maximal number had been reduced.
 
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Does the possible points (42) limit UConn's ceiling? Are you saying that other schools with more scholarship players have higher ceilings? If that's true, it would make very little sense since schools are not compelled to maximize scholarships, and this measure would seem to require precisely that. Indeed, one might argue that a significant NCAA penalty (say, 2 or 3 scholarships) could drop the maximal score so low that a school would find it difficult to recover. As the school regained scholarships after probation, it would find itself running afoul of APR and losing scholarships because its maximal number had been reduced.

I don't think it limits the ceiling in terms of the final score. If UConn had 44 possible points, for instance, you'd still be dividing the total number of points by the total possible. The only thing that changes slightly is that the fewer points you have (ie the fewer scholarships you have) the more magnified each mistake is. Conversely, you also have more opportunities to make mistakes.

Using the above example, let's say Wolf had been with the team first semester, eligible and earned both points. Then (assuming JCM lost 1 point for not maintaining the 2.6 GPA, as in the above example) it would be 43 out of 44 possible points instead of 41 of 42,(43/44=.9772 x 1000), or a 977 instead of a 971. You're always judged on the number of scholarships your specific program has, so docking the 'ships in theory doesn't matter, but it does magnify the impact of mistakes.
 
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I don't think it limits the ceiling in terms of the final score. If UConn had 44 possible points, for instance, you'd still be dividing the total number of points by the total possible. The only thing that changes slightly is that the fewer points you have (ie the fewer scholarships you have) the more magnified each mistake is. Conversely, you also have more opportunities to make mistakes.

Using the above example, let's say Wolf had been with the team first semester, eligible and earned both points. Then (assuming JCM lost 1 point for not maintaining the 2.6 GPA, as in the above example) it would be 43 out of 44 possible points instead of 41 of 42,(43/44=.9772 x 1000), or a 977 instead of a 971. You're always judged on the number of scholarships your specific program has, so docking the 'ships in theory doesn't matter, but it does magnify the impact of mistakes.

Are you sure that's how it works? I always read that the actual numbers were doubled then multiplied by 10 to get the actual APR, no division.
 

RS9999X

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No. It's still 1000.

If JCM left on a team with 13 scholarships (52 possible points) under the same scenarios the score would be 51/52 or 980.

If it was a team with 8 scholarships (32 possible points) it would be 31/32 or 968.

There are some other tweaks in the NCAA waiver notes with a pro. In the case of a pro-waiver like Walker the rules say to subtract 1 from the denominator instead of adding 1 to the numerator . In other words he leaves a 3 /4, UConn gets the waiver, and ends up a 3 /3 that year intead of a 4 /4.

The example I gave in the above post is likely a 40/41 after the NBA waiver is official.

Now let's get into the next mess--players who left early and aren't collecting a pro-check due to the NBA Strike. How does that affect NCAA waivers on guys like Walker?

It is, after all, the NCAA.

Remember I have no insight into who and what the underlying numbers are due to student privacy. But, now that they release the numbers yearly the board geeks will be able to make some solid guesses
 

RS9999X

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Definitely division/ There's an NCAA worksheet on the internet that they use in Seminars to explain 'ed up system . I'll post it later,
 

RS9999X

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From the Michigan Site


Example of APR Calculation for a Men’s Football Team (85 students at start of year. 170 possible points (2 each)

Semester 1 (Fall) Points Earned
75 student-athletes eligible and retained to next term (or graduate in that term)
75*(2 of 2) = 150 of 150

3 student-athletes are retained to next term but are academically ineligible
3*(1 of 2) = 3 of 6

5 student-athletes leave the university while academically eligible
5*(1 of 2) = 5 of 10

2 student-athletes leave the university while academically ineligible
2*(0 of 2) = 0 of 4

Semester Total 158 of 170 (929 APR) or (158/170) * 1000
 
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Per Dave Borges' most recent blog, our score for this past year will be 975. JCM is the only player who lost a point for us since his gpa was not high enough as a transfer.
 
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We will improve and this is a non story in regards to being banned from March Madness.
 

RS9999X

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Per Dave Borges' most recent blog, our score for this past year will be 975. JCM is the only player who lost a point for us since his gpa was not high enough as a transfer.

975 is 40/41 on points. The NBA rounds down.

Fall Semester:

10 players. Each earned 2 points. 1 for Retention, 1 for Progress. Total 20/20.

Spring Semester:

Wolfe Added.

11 players. Each earned two points except JCM and Walker. Walker's waiver counts him as a 1/1 for the semester. JCM is 1 for 2.

20/21.

Total

40/41 or (.9756 * 1,000) = 975 rounded down.

Sample Calc Worksheet from NCAA at Clemson web site

http://tinyurl.com/6gpyxzd
 
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With a 1000 score next year the rolling score would go up to 911, still below the 930. But this is all based on the old premise. If it starts with a new slate, we will be in the upper echelon.
 
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With a 1000 score next year the rolling score would go up to 911, still below the 930. But this is all based on the old premise. If it starts with a new slate, we will be in the upper echelon.

Is the rolling score still relevent? I always thought that was an unnecessary complication of a convoluted process.
 
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