Lights. Camera. ACCtion!

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#1
>>One year out from the launch of the ACC Network, the conference’s schools are spending more than $100 million on production capabilities, infrastructure and staff in preparation for what they hope will be a cash windfall.<<

Lights. Camera. ACCtion!

>>The ramp-up to the ACC Network will be an expensive one, to say the least, with ACC schools budgeting $6 million to $10 million each to buy equipment, build infrastructure and hire staff that will man high-end production studios and cutting-edge control rooms — the bones of a network that will be owned and operated by ESPN.

Schools in the SEC, by comparison, spent around $30 million cumulatively, ranging from $700,000 at Florida to $7 million at Arkansas prior to the SEC Network’s launch. The SEC Network is structured the same as the ACC’s — ESPN owns it and profits are split with the conference.<<
 
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#2
Another misleading article. Many of the SEC schools had facilities in place and only minor upgrades were required. If anything, schools like Florida lost money because they gave up their de facto network for a slice of the SECN.
 
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#3
The back story is that the SEC kicked off with many schools only having the equipment for lower quality digital with a single camera, poor audio and a slow build out.... and have only recently come up to linear network standards...

The SEC spent a ton of money after the launch and the ACC is determined to launch full fledged with top studios and equipment.
 

CL82

Trust the process
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#4
>>One year out from the launch of the ACC Network, the conference’s schools are spending more than $100 million on production capabilities, infrastructure and staff in preparation for what they hope will be a cash windfall.<<

Lights. Camera. ACCtion!

>>The ramp-up to the ACC Network will be an expensive one, to say the least, with ACC schools budgeting $6 million to $10 million each to buy equipment, build infrastructure and hire staff that will man high-end production studios and cutting-edge control rooms — the bones of a network that will be owned and operated by ESPN.

Schools in the SEC, by comparison, spent around $30 million cumulatively, ranging from $700,000 at Florida to $7 million at Arkansas prior to the SEC Network’s launch. The SEC Network is structured the same as the ACC’s — ESPN owns it and profits are split with the conference.<<
So the school is paying for production, including infrastructure for a network owned by ESPN, the profits of which are split 50/50 after ESPN takes its costs off the top? Wow that's a good deal... for ESPN.
 
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#6
When the SEC launched...ESPN had to still bring in their production trucks...after launch, the SEC has upgraded and, according to Eric Frey, experienced difficulties and extra expense because of the slow build out.

But regarding being a deal for the conference vs a deal for ESPN...the mothership has spent untold millions developing a product and brand and is leveraging carriage. The PAC 12 probably has an idea of the value of a "rain maker".

The ideal, of course, is that both partners make money. And ESPN has been bullish on that probability.
 
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#8
Well...of course not...the OP was trying to exercise some schadenfreud...that would be the only interest.
 
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#9
I really don’t care
Well...of course not...the OP was trying to exercise some schadenfreud...that would be the only interest.
There have been multiple discussions here on the cost of ramping up for the ACC Network, the delays and how it may drive future conference realignment decisions.

... some on here follow more college sports (and their dynamics) than just UConn specific issues.

If it doesn’t interest ya - move on to something that does. It’s really not that hard.
 
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#10
It does interest me...it was Who Ha who was not interested.

I was interested enough by your post to research it....look a little deeper. See what really did happen with the SEC.

The whole subject of cord cutting, digital access, ala carte selection, bundles, etc...I find very current and interesting.

I am a streamer as much as possible....but still must rely on the content owner for access.
 
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#11
There have been multiple discussions here on the cost of ramping up for the ACC Network, the delays and how it may drive future conference realignment decisions.

... some on here follow more college sports (and their dynamics) than just UConn specific issues.

If it doesn’t interest ya - move on to something that does. It’s really not that hard.
Exactly what I did. Anything involving ACC or laughing at troubles of former conference mates is over for me. The curse of Gavitt lives on. I am just bored stiff with the greed and hypocrisy that destroyed the greatest college hoops conference of all time. In fact, like the mega mergers that occurred in the business world (ie GE, AOL/time Warner, banks) college sports will have to figure out how to clean up the mess when, not if it fails.
 
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#12
So the school is paying for production, including infrastructure for a network owned by ESPN, the profits of which are split 50/50 after ESPN takes its costs off the top? Wow that's a good deal... for ESPN.
I would imagine ESPN pays for advertising, distribution around the world (unless they own their own satellites and fiber optic networks across the country). They do of course have their own uplink in Bristol but that's only the first leg.
 

CL82

Trust the process
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#13
I would imagine ESPN pays for advertising, distribution around the world (unless they own their own satellites and fiber optic networks across the country). They do of course have their own uplink in Bristol but that's only the first leg.
Fair enough, of course ESPN’s costs come off the top before the 50-50 split, while the schools costs are borne by the schools.
 

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