Using a VPN when booking a flight

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#1
Anyone ever hear of doing this? Sounds like an Internet urban legend, but I've heard stranger things that turned out to be true.

 

Fishy

Puncher of Throats
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#2
Most of the places suggesting it also want to sell you a VPN.

Use Skiplagged or a similar service.

Or take a bus - they are very reasonable. You can get from DC to Boston for like a dollar!
 

polycom

I heard a beep, who just joined?
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#3
The only one I've heard is if you keep checking a flight overtime it'll become more expensive...
 

Husky25

Dink & Dunk beat the Greatest Show on Turf.
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#4
Most of the places suggesting it also want to sell you a VPN.

Use Skiplagged or a similar service.

Or take a bus - they are very reasonable. You can get from DC to Boston for like a dollar!
Yeah, but it's Fung Wah level.

It's like playing Powerball, but instead of a slim chance of winning $100 Million, there is a better shot at a bald tire blowout and rolling, Another 48 Hours style, into a I-95 ditch.
 
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#5
Anyone ever hear of doing this? Sounds like an Internet urban legend ...
Ayup, widely known yet not consistent nor truly worth the effort for $200 steerage seats. However, significant differences can exist for pricier flights when pricing high-priced seats with the same airline, partner airline (OneWorld, Sky, Star), or even flight search company's websites in different countries, e.g., Expedia US vs Expedia HK.

Passengers booking flights with 3rd parties, e.g., Kayak, Expedia, Skiplagged, ctrip, et al have shiftier ground to stand on versus people holding tickets booked directly with airline A or its' partner airlines. Is saving $50 worthy of being low man on the totem pole?

Leveraging a free or nominal fee VPN is one thing, but being able to read different languages, utilize currency arbitrage, etc. helps. Rate differences may occur by language and currency. And sometimes, info is simply updated faster/slower on different sites.

Setting aside the prior info, some of the biggest rate differences experienced are between 2 partner airlines for identical flights, e.g., American vs Cathay Pacific, BA, et al; United vs Air China, Lufthansa, et al; Delta vs China Southern, KLM, Air France, et al. Particularly if a person holds significant rewards points or is paying a few to several thousand for seats closer to the pilot, this can be worth some extra effort.
 


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