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OT: The eight perfectly made films

UcMiami

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So I realized Charlie is missing - Modern Times or City Lights? Marx Bros?

Here's AFI's list of 100:
I am at 94 of the 100 and not sure I agree with all of them, but it is a good starting place. If you go to that site and do the 'back to lists' in the upper left - they have lots more different configurations that are also fun.

Still not sure what perfectly made actually means or how they define it in the OP.

When I think back on some of those golden era movies, what stands out as much as the stars is the quality of all the other actors and how beautifully even the bit parts were filled with interest. One of the reasons that The Usual Suspects stands out to me, or Tarantino's films - the breadth of the casts is impressive.
 
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A tour de force for Lee Marvin.
You are right. I mixed up Jack Palance and Lee Marvin. Palance was the star of Have Gun Will Travel. They both were leathery tough guys, although Paladin (the character Palance portrayed) was an upholder of the law, albeit in an outlaw kinda way.
 
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Moby Dick
The Cain Mutuny
Treasure of the Sierra Madre
On the Beach
2001
In Harms Way
20,000n Leagues Under the Sea
 
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You are right. I mixed up Jack Palance and Lee Marvin. Palance was the star of Have Gun Will Travel. They both were leathery tough guys, although Paladin (the character Palance portrayed) was an upholder of the law, albeit in an outlaw kinda way.
Sorry Crossover, you’re wrong again. Richard Boone was the star of Have Gun Will Travel. Shane has been mentioned in this thread and Jack Palance did play the villain in that one.
 
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Sorry Crossover, you’re wrong again. Richard Boone was the star of Have Gun Will Travel. Shane has been mentioned in this thread and Jack Palance did play the villain in that one.
“Jack Wilson” was one of the scariest bad guys in all of cinema and in one of the greatest movies ever made.


 
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diggerfoot

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So I realized Charlie is missing - Modern Times or City Lights? Marx Bros?

Here's AFI's list of 100:
I am at 94 of the 100 and not sure I agree with all of them, but it is a good starting place. If you go to that site and do the 'back to lists' in the upper left - they have lots more different configurations that are also fun.

Still not sure what perfectly made actually means or how they define it in the OP.

When I think back on some of those golden era movies, what stands out as much as the stars is the quality of all the other actors and how beautifully even the bit parts were filled with interest. One of the reasons that The Usual Suspects stands out to me, or Tarantino's films - the breadth of the casts is impressive.
I saw a list like that, but can’t recall the source, which gave grades. The highest for movies like Citizen Kane was 99/100, which contributes to my previous cheeky comment about “perfectly made.”

The methodology behind this list is laudable, but I would think Fantasia to be in the top 100 for its groundbreaking uniqueness alone. Outside of that who am I to argue with 1500 experts?
 
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I saw a list like that, but can’t recall the source, which gave grades. The highest for movies like Citizen Kane was 99/100, which contributes to my previous cheeky comment about “perfectly made.”

The methodology behind this list is laudable, but I would think Fantasia to be in the top 100 for its groundbreaking uniqueness alone. Outside of that who am I to argue with 1500 experts?
I wouldn’t confuse a “perfectly made movie” with one of the “greatest films ever made”. There’s a difference, and it’s a big one. A perfectly made movie CAN be one of the greatest films ever made, but it’s not necessarily the other way around, meaning there are quite a few of the greatest films ever made that are NOT perfectly made. A perfectly made film, to my way of thinking, are great films that had meticulous scripting, great story and dialogue, camera work, editing, lighting, and acting. Every scene and every camera shot in that scene has a story board, which are actual large physical boards made up by the art department. Hitchcock made his films this way, as did Orson Welles, and for the most part David Lean, George Stevens, Leo McCarey, George Cukor and John Ford. Although McCarey, Cukor, Ford and Stevens sometimes let their cinematographers and actors stray from the plan. At the other end of the spectrum there’s directors like Robert Altman in M*A*S*H who just let his actors ad lib many scenes and made a great film, or as Frank Capra or Oliver Stone did in many of their films. Their method is different but a lucky shoot can be a great shoot that captures a priceless scene.
 
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I like to learn of other’s favorites also.
I myself, though a big film fan, do not at all think I’m qualified to select a “perfect film”, only the ones I have really, really enjoyed.
 

diggerfoot

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I wouldn’t confuse a “perfectly made movie” with one of the “greatest films ever made”. There’s a difference, and it’s a big one. A perfectly made movie CAN be one of the greatest films ever made, but it’s not necessarily the other way around, meaning there are quite a few of the greatest films ever made that are NOT perfectly made. A perfectly made film, to my way of thinking, are great films that had meticulous scripting, great story and dialogue, camera work, editing, lighting, and acting. Every scene and every camera shot in that scene has a story board, which are actual large physical boards made up by the art department. Hitchcock made his films this way, as did Orson Welles, and for the most part David Lean, George Stevens, Leo McCarey, George Cukor and John Ford. Although McCarey, Cukor, Ford and Stevens sometimes let their cinematographers and actors stray from the plan. At the other end of the spectrum there’s directors like Robert Altman in M*A*S*H who just let his actors ad lib many scenes and made a great film, or as Frank Capra or Oliver Stone did in many of their films. Their method is different but a lucky shoot can be a great shoot that captures a priceless scene.
“Perfectly made” is hyperbolic phrasing to engage people. It implies no flaws, but what are the operational standards by which one can conclude no flaws were made? At least the phrasing “greatest” does not imply the movie has been empirically determined to contain no flaws.

Either “perfectly made” would have to mean a very narrow standard that does not incorporate the large breadth of movie making, or I suspect there is no such thing as a “perfectly made” movie. If the former, then who decides what should be the particular attributes examined and which to be ignored in claiming perfection? If the latter, then why not use the more appropriate “greatest” movie claim as click bait, rather than “perfectly made?”

Obviously the discussion on this thread has turned to people’s opinions of the best movies, which was inevitable and I suggest the intent of the hyperbolic phrasing “perfectly made” all along, since the “perfectly made” movie, void of standards for determining perfection, does not exist. In my attempt at wry humor I realize now I’m just being a “spoil sport,” so I’ll just bow out now.
 

CL82

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“Perfectly made” is hyperbolic phrasing to engage people. It implies no flaws, but what are the operational standards by which one can conclude no flaws were made? At least the phrasing “greatest” does not imply the movie has been empirically determined to contain no flaws.
I agree and we are all going to view "perfect" through our own lens. Still, Godfather and Casablanca seemed to come very close to that high standard.
 
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Ed, let me add three movies you might really like in this category:

1944 The Best Years of Our Lives. You'd have to be heartless not to be moved by this movie.

1957 The Bridge on the River Kwai Sir Alec Guiness ( before Star Wars), and William Holden.

1957 "The Enemy Below" William Holden (again) and Curt Jurgens play a cat and mouse game between an American Destroyer and a German U-Boat. If you haven't heard of it, take the time to watch it.

Honorable mentions go to "Platoon," "Full Metal Jacket," "Decision Before Dawn," (w/Oskar Werner and Richard Basehart--most excellent!), and of course, Kubrick's "Paths of Glory," w/Kirk Douglas, Adoph Menjou and George MacReady.

Enjoy!

-

"The Enemy Below" is excellent. It is one of the few movies I never turn down the opportunity to watch. And it was Robert Mitchum, not William Holden as the American destroyer captain.
 
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Sorry Crossover, you’re wrong again. Richard Boone was the star of Have Gun Will Travel. Shane has been mentioned in this thread and Jack Palance did play the villain in that one.
Yikes. I can't keep my tough guys straight. Time to resort to Google rather than trusting my tired and ancient brain. Who would you pick in a face off between Palance, Boone and Marvin?
 
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To stick with Eight
Citizen Kane
Chinatown
Pulp Fiction - yes it's THAT good and I don't like Tarrantino's other stuff.
Alien
Lawrence of Arabia
Das Boot
Old Lions - Maybe it's just my need to lighten up this list with a happy ending


But I always have to give an Honorable Mention to the Coen Brothers:, (1) Oh Brother, (1-A) Lebowski (3) Raising Arizona, (4) Fargo, (5) No Country for Old Men; etc., etc., etc.

Ben Hur: PLUS-Loved the presentation of Jesus that didn't show his face. Hardened Protestant here. Won't watch the Passion of Christand dislike the ceiling of the Cistine Chapel despite its absolute beauty.
MINUS- The Romans Never used slaves to row war galleys.
Still don't know if I like it or not after about 8 viewings.
 
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In the limited category of World War II films I'll give you three of my favorites:

Navy: "The Cruel Sea"

Air Force (Corps): "Twelve O'Clock High"

Army: I suppose most folks would go with Saving Pvt Ryan, and it's a fine film, but
let me suggest a small offbeat film called "Attack" in which Eddie Albert gives perhaps
his finest, if least sympathetic, performance.
I’ll go with Bridge over the River Kwai. Great film.
 
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Very intelligent discussion currently being broached about perfectly made films vs greatest films and their potentially non-synonymous nature.

My favorite films are low-budget, under-hyped efforts that one encounters without high expectations (only because there's not all that much buzz surrounding 'em) that turn out to be perfect, or near-perfect realizations of what the creators originally had in mind. I'll offer two recent examples, neither of which belong in the "greatest movie" category, but are undeniably brilliant: "Sorry We Missed You" and "The Florida Project." Do yourselves a favor!
 

CL82

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"The Enemy Below" is excellent. It is one of the few movies I never turn down the opportunity to watch. And it was Robert Mitchum, not William Holden as the American destroyer captain.
I feel like Run Silent, Run Deep with Clark Gable should get a mention here as well.
 

msf22b

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i would certainly nominate Jules et Jim (1962, Truffaut)
as a perfectly made film.
 

BlueandOG

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Wish that the Thread title was which movies do you watch whenever that they come on TV. For me they would be in no special order:

The Shawshank Redemption
The Blind Side
The Replacements
The Godfather
The Godfather II
Remember the Titans
Saving Private Ryan
Apollo 13
Taken
Forest Gump

Just to name a few.
This list, minus The Blind Side, plus:

Glory
Michael Clayton
The Matrix
Black Hawk Down
Dumb and Dumber
 
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I wouldn't know perfect if it feel on my head but I know what I like and the films that had an effect on me. Most early films have been mentioned many times, mine not at all or rarely. I think.
South Pacific
House on a Haunted Hill
Vikings
Giant
Robin Hood Flynn version
Dante's Peak
Marx Bro movies
All Harry Potter
All Hunger Game
Avatar
 

CL82

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I wouldn't know perfect if it feel on my head but I know what I like and the films that had an effect on me. Most early films have been mentioned many times, mine not at all or rarely. I think.
South Pacific
House on a Haunted Hill
Vikings
Giant
Robin Hood Flynn version
Dante's Peak
Marx Bro movies
All Harry Potter
All Hunger Game
Avatar
Robin Hood is an excellent movie.
 

Bigboote

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Still not sure what perfectly made actually means or how they define it in the OP.
The youtube link in the OP presented the eight movies that have perfect 100 scores from Metacritic. That’s a high bar in that none of the critics can dislike a movie, but none has to love it.
 
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Robin Hood is an excellent movie.
Didn’t they make three versions? I believe one with Errol Flynn, one with Kevin Costner, and another one with Russell Crowe. There were a couple other lower budget efforts. I hope you mean the Flynn version.
 
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