Stock trading

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We started discussing this in another thread so I decided to start a new thread. Would love to know what sectors and stocks people are in, with successes and if you want to share, bad trades or holds. My brief story below:

Traded a lot from 99-01 but volatility of Dot Com Market collapse forced me out with a decent profit. Fast forward19 years, I dove back in at the bottom in March. Had some success trading Comcast the first week, got caught in a bad trade with Citrix. Had an initial wishlist of NFLX, DOCU, Roku and Comcast. Didn’t pull the trigger quickly enough and watched most run away. Roku and Gartner I’ve been in and out of but just can’t seem to win on them. Two big winners have been DocuSign and Five Nine Inc (FIVN). I’m out now except for a small position in DocuSign, as I expect tech stocks to sell off soon and want to be ready to buy on dip.

Stocks Im looking at adding:
MSFT
AMZN
FB
ROKU
TWLO
FIVN
BX (Blackstone)
Tesla
OKTA
PENN
Walmart
CCL (Carnival)
IT (Gartner)
 

XLCenterFan

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Think of the Miami building collapse...the 35w Minneapolis bridge...Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill....the list goes on. All potentially avoidable if DPLS has the capabilities they are saying they do. The public will demand real time feedback on these structures, and a reasonable person could expect this tech added to building codes of our future smart cities. Cha-Ching.
Absolutely. There's far too many roads, bridges, tunnels, towers, etc. in America that are past their prime or getting close. Hopefully DPLS can fill the void that exists concerning how to monitor these structures.
 

UConnSwag11

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anyone trying to find some of these premarket rockets? Seems like every day or week there are a dozen or so that just take off to 25%, 50%, or over 100%
 

XLCenterFan

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Thought this was pretty solid. In particular the strong demand for jobs in the suburbs creates a mismatch with many of the unemployed living in city centers. Is there a reverse commute transportation infrastructure? I don't think so.

Jobs Are Hard to Fill, and Ideology Makes It Hard to Understand Why - WSJ
A job location mismatch is part of the problem. There are many factors leading to employers needing help and not being able to find it at the moment. Despite what some people are saying about the $300 unemployment top-off, there are many factors, including more than these, but these are a few that I've seen/heard:
1- People realized they weren't working in a job they liked or desired and have moved on to another (especially true for my friends who worked in restaurants)
2- People realized they were underpaid and either found a higher paying job, or are getting the skills needed to acquire one
3- People made realizations about what is important in life, and prioritize money and material goods less now, and thus are willing to work less
4- Enhanced unemployment benefits...Why work 40 hours a week to take home $450 when you can relax and take it easy for more? Especially knowing there will be a job open in September when the add-on ends
5- People are still fearful of covid, especially in industries that deal with the public
6- People may now have to/want to spend more time with children or older family members
7- In homes with two parents children, when schools were closed and people began working from home, it was sometimes necessary for one of the parents to dedicate their time to the kids...they got used to it and haven't looked to go back to work yet.
 
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1-2 weeks away from schools re-opening in some states, e.g., Arizona, Georgia, etc. As children are back in school and extra unemployment bonuses further fade away, observing rates of people more proactively seeking employment and higher net revenue may prove interesting.

Meanwhile in some large cities, rental cost increases reflect rising demand among moving currents, returnees, and potential new residents. Boston and Chicago remain down a bit now, but will lease rates lag 1-2 years barring massive new SARS-2 spikes or proof existing or enhanced vaccines prove ineffective against the India Delta or other SARS-2 variants? Should/if a 2022-23 economic decline kicks in, some employment seekers may become far more open minded about offices/restaurants/not WFA. Time will tell.

 
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HTZZW - If patient, and LT-focused, with 30-year exercise periods and $13.80 strike price Hertz warrants may offer sizeable upside. Not without risk, but try renting vehicles at many locations, airports, etc now let alone considering HTZZ's recent bankruptcy-enabled lower debt and competitive upside versus CAR, Enterprise, etc.
 
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When a company you own is down 10% in a day, how much would you buy on the dip?

I own bili, plan to hold and believe it's a good buy. What % of what you own would you buy on a 10% dip?
Good call, thanks. The Chinese stocks are bouncing back from the Didi situation. I bought down to $100 and picked up some quick spare change. See if you had blown your load at $111, you wouldn't have profited so quickly.
 
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Need special software for this I guess.
Identify the Market: Before starting the mobile app development process by mlsdev.com/services/web-development, it is essential to identify the target audience for the app idea. This ensures that the kind of functional requirements that the app development professionals will need to consider while developing the app. As per the app idea, the functional requirements would differ according to the nature of the business.
 

HuskyHawk

The triumphant return of the Blues Brothers.
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It's not going back to where it was. They need to stop thinking about bolstering mass transit, unless they can add more point to point transit outside of Boston. I think I actually participated in this survey from McKinsey. I expect most cities would see similar results.

"Baker and Labor and Workforce Development Secretary Rosalin Acosta each pointed to the report’s estimate that 300,000 to 400,000 workers could need to transition to different occupations or occupational categories over the next decade if the pandemic-accelerated trends around automation, e-commerce and digitization continue.

“This isn’t some distant, academic question that will need to be solved by future generations,” Acosta said. “By 2025 to 2030, the ability to successfully reskill approximately 30,000 to 40,000 people per year could lead to a vibrant commonwealth in which new opportunities outpace workforce growth.”

No surprise here. My town seems to be booming.
The report considers implications across regions, finding that Greater Boston suburbs “may be the natural beneficiaries of future of work trends, with potential for increased vibrancy as remote-eligible workers spend more time closer to home.” Meanwhile, it said urban residential areas within about 15 miles of Boston, with lower average wages, higher proportions of immigrant and minority communities, and more residents employed in vulnerable sectors like hospitality, retail and food service “may face the most challenges post-pandemic.”

Urban, suburban shift highlighted in future of work report – Boston 25 News
 
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It's not going back to where it was. They need to stop thinking about bolstering mass transit, unless they can add more point to point transit outside of Boston. I think I actually participated in this survey from McKinsey. I expect most cities would see similar results.



No surprise here. My town seems to be booming.


Urban, suburban shift highlighted in future of work report – Boston 25 News
Its going to get a lot more interesting in September, Back Bay & financial district are at less than 50% capacity and the trains are still empty. That is very likely to be different after labor day and I expect lots of TRAFFIC NIGHTMARE stories around here and in other big cities with mass transit and bad traffic. This ultimately will aid the long-term shift to more work from home, but lots of companies want employees back 3-4 days a week. There are going to be issues getting the workers to the jobs much like the general supply chain shortages of materials in the economy resulting from pandemic stops & starts.

Besides higher gas prices, not sure what specific economic impact the fall traffic Armageddon will have on the economy. What companies or industries will benefit?
 

HuskyHawk

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Its going to get a lot more interesting in September, Back Bay & financial district are at less than 50% capacity and the trains are still empty. That is very likely to be different after labor day and I expect lots of TRAFFIC NIGHTMARE stories around here and in other big cities with mass transit and bad traffic. This ultimately will aid the long-term shift to more work from home, but lots of companies want employees back 3-4 days a week. There are going to be issues getting the workers to the jobs much like the general supply chain shortages of materials in the economy resulting from pandemic stops & starts.

Besides higher gas prices, not sure what specific economic impact the fall traffic Armageddon will have on the economy. What companies or industries will benefit?

I'm not sure there will be an traffic Armageddon. I don't think commuter traffic will come back to pre-pandemic levels. Boston traffic has been awful for several years. I agree there will be issues getting workers to jobs but that's because I expect jobs to be more distributed away from city centers.

I think the impacts will vary greatly in different industries and jobs. Waitstaff, cooks, bartender, plumbers, electricians, retail, hairstylists, etc....demand will be up in the burbs and down in the city center. Short and long term.

White collar office workers, hybrid WFH/WFO, full WFH and a few in full WFO. The economics are too compelling. We are shutting down office space. Talked to a financial services person who worked downtown, they are going from like 10 floors to 3 in their building. Then you add the reduced commute cost and time savings to employees. Reduced electricity cost. Any productivity lost is easily made up for by massive cost savings. Companies that don't offer at least hybrid WFH are doomed. Loads of reports of people just quitting when asked to go back full time.
 

the Q

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I'm not sure there will be an traffic Armageddon. I don't think commuter traffic will come back to pre-pandemic levels. Boston traffic has been awful for several years. I agree there will be issues getting workers to jobs but that's because I expect jobs to be more distributed away from city centers.

I think the impacts will vary greatly in different industries and jobs. Waitstaff, cooks, bartender, plumbers, electricians, retail, hairstylists, etc....demand will be up in the burbs and down in the city center. Short and long term.

White collar office workers, hybrid WFH/WFO, full WFH and a few in full WFO. The economics are too compelling. We are shutting down office space. Talked to a financial services person who worked downtown, they are going from like 10 floors to 3 in their building. Then you add the reduced commute cost and time savings to employees. Reduced electricity cost. Any productivity lost is easily made up for by massive cost savings. Companies that don't offer at least hybrid WFH are doomed. Loads of reports of people just quitting when asked to go back full time.

I was told by my boss that it would be cheaper to pay for me to have a co working space membership than the electricity from my location at work alone.
 

HuskyHawk

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I was told by my boss that it would be cheaper to pay for me to have a co working space membership than the electricity from my location at work alone.

When you can shut a whole building it really makes a difference. Our offices are already almost all in the suburbs, and we are still shutting buildings. Electric, internet, maintenance, cleaning, landscaping, snow plowing, trash removal, security, amenities like gyms, coffee stops or cafeterias. That's before considering cost savings to the employee and external costs like the carbon footprint (which most companies want to claim they reduce). The economics of commuting are beyond awful. I realize that some people are wedded to it and refuse to admit that it is on its way to the dustbin of history.
 

XLCenterFan

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If WFH is going up, so are divorce rates. People will lose their minds being around the significant other and/or kids all day. I'll take not working from home all day. Any marital separation-based stock plays?
 
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Match.com? Lol
Wouldn't know, yet media rumors suggest females prefer BMBL.

Side topic someone referenced above, potential businesses to benefit via WFH > home solar, generators (GNRC), dependable/fast internet, suburban shared office space, etc. WFA opportunities?
 

HuskyHawk

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Remember the ad with Courtney saying, "come find me." I found her home address and sent her a letter. I think she's waiting to reply so everything she writes is memorable.


I am sure that poor Courtney struggles to attract male attention. Thankfully Match is there to connect her with stalkers guys like you.
 
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When you can shut a whole building it really makes a difference. Our offices are already almost all in the suburbs, and we are still shutting buildings. Electric, internet, maintenance, cleaning, landscaping, snow plowing, trash removal, security, amenities like gyms, coffee stops or cafeterias. That's before considering cost savings to the employee and external costs like the carbon footprint (which most companies want to claim they reduce). The economics of commuting are beyond awful. I realize that some people are wedded to it and refuse to admit that it is on its way to the dustbin of history.
It is not people wedded to a commute, its companies that benefit from many things including accountability, the increased collaboration, more rapid exchange of information and ideas gained from having people in same place. Office demand (as evidenced by searches on CoStar & Loopnet) has recently returned to pre-pandemic levels. No doubt, companies will downsize and allow WAYYYYYYY more work from home. But there will still also be a significant number of companies that will require employees to come to the office and industries/jobs where doing so adds value for both the employee and the employer. People didn't only commute to Manhattan b/c their employers made them or they loved the train, they did so b/c Manhattan is one of the greatest cities in the world offering innumerous things you cannot get in the 'burbs.

Commuting and office work in major southeastern cities like Dallas has almost fully returned. Office demand in the suburbs is actually pretty strong across the country right now & likely more better micro live-work-play suburbs prosper (i.e. in Boston 128 belt will be very popular for both companies and residences).

I would wager any silly thing anyone wants to wager that there will be some massive traffic jams in Boston, DC, NYC, San Fran etc & nightmarish commuting and parking stories when workers return en masse after Labor Day.
 
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Think of the Miami building collapse...the 35w Minneapolis bridge...Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill....the list goes on. All potentially avoidable if DPLS has the capabilities they are saying they do. The public will demand real time feedback on these structures, and a reasonable person could expect this tech added to building codes of our future smart cities. Cha-Ching.
DPLS Cha-Ching thanks to @Gutter King > up ~375%.

DPLS > Trans-Alaska Pipeline?
 
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Good call, thanks. The Chinese stocks are bouncing back from the Didi situation. I bought down to $100 and picked up some quick spare change. See if you had blown your load at $111, you wouldn't have profited so quickly.
When mentioning "The Chinese stocks", quite a broad reference. Which types"?

Cap, ADRs, SSE? SZSE? STAR? A shares? Or, south of the mainland border H shares? HKSE? Mainland-domiciled? HK-domiciled, Caymans, Malta, Madigascar domiciled? NYSE? LSE? SOE? Non-SOE? Sector? If only all generically-categorized "Chinese stocks" consistently traded in unison.

Treading lightly with the Middle Kingdom (Zhongguo), holding what we've held mostly a year+ to several years, only added increasingly globally-competitive quality, mainland-specific consumer brand names. Companies benefiting from Biden/Trump aided, rapidly skyrocketing nationalism Otherwise, now only enabling CNXT, CXSE and CHIQ ETF managers to pick versus us risking touching any more NYSE or LSE listed mainland ADRs. Separately, plenty of non-mainland targeted ETFs or non-mainland companies (JP, TW, KR, western) offer plenty of mainland exposure without the Central Govt-party boys' regulatory claws and intervening BS. Could be wrong, just one perspective.
 
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When mentioning "The Chinese stocks", quite a broad reference. Which types"?

Cap, ADRs, SSE? SZSE? STAR? A shares? Or, south of the mainland border H shares? HKSE? Mainland-domiciled? HK-domiciled, Caymans, Malta, Madigascar domiciled? NYSE? LSE? SOE? Non-SOE? Sector? If only all generically-categorized "Chinese stocks" consistently traded in unison.

Treading lightly with the Middle Kingdom (Zhongguo), holding what we've held mostly a year+ to several years, only added increasingly globally-competitive quality, mainland-specific consumer brand names. Companies benefiting from Biden/Trump aided, rapidly skyrocketing nationalism Otherwise, now only enabling CNXT, CXSE and CHIQ ETF managers to pick versus us risking touching any more NYSE or LSE listed mainland ADRs. Separately, plenty of non-mainland targeted ETFs or non-mainland companies (JP, TW, KR, western) offer plenty of mainland exposure without the Central Govt-party boys' regulatory claws and intervening BS. Could be wrong, just one perspective.
BABA & BILI. They were both up 5% Tuesday when just about everything else in my watchlist was down. Both were getting hit harder than everything else the days proceeding, because of the scare with the DIDI situation, then Tuesday the global trade news came out. Also, I'm sure you've been watching the shipping bottleneck in the south that is freeing up.



Amazon & MELI have been thriving the last couple weeks, BABA was struggling the same time.

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