OT: Sharkbite for plumbing

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#1
I woke up to a burst pipe in the basement. It's at an elbow, and 1/2 inch from a joist, so I'm not going to try an solder a new joint.

A guy at Home Depot mentioned a while ago about a reasonably new product called sharkbite. I believe no soldering is needed - cut out the leaking area, and plug in the sharkbite thing.

Has anyone used this before? If so, how'd it work out?
 

scoobydoo

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#4
I woke up to a burst pipe in the basement. It's at an elbow, and 1/2 inch from a joist, so I'm not going to try an solder a new joint.

A guy at Home Depot mentioned a while ago about a reasonably new product called sharkbite. I believe no soldering is needed - cut out the leaking area, and plug in the sharkbite thing.

Has anyone used this before? If so, how'd it work out?
They work great. I have had one on a pipe for 10 years
 
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#9
It makes plumbing like legos. I've used them and they're the greatest
Can a joint be unsoldered? I bought the shark bite elbow, but if I cut the current elbow out, I'm not sure the sharkbite will have anything to grab on to.
 

Dove

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#10
Here at work a guy was recently raving about a pipe-fix that didn't require soldering. Had to be this SharkBite thingamabobber. I'll verify.
 

CL82

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#11
I hadn't heard of this before. It looks terrific.
I'm pretty comfortable sweating a joint and prefer it to traditional compression fittings but this looks easy and apparently holds up well. I think that I'll try it next time there is a need.

Can a joint be unsoldered?
Yes.
 
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#17
I hadn't heard of this before. It looks terrific.
I'm pretty comfortable sweating a joint and prefer it to traditional compression fittings but this looks easy and apparently holds up well. I think that I'll try it next time there is a need.



Yes.
Drain the pipe, heat it up and pull it apart?
 
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#21
That looks a bit easier than trying to resolder the joint. I can't get to it well enough to clean the joint and heat up the back side well enough to pull the solder in.
Agree with the sentiment above - Sharkbites are really a phenomenal invention - work on CPVC as well as copper. Pricey, so I only use in a time pinch or when positioning is an issue, as in your case.
Be sure to clean the extra solder off the pipe ends when you unsweat that joint - get it hot, use a thick rag (not wet!) to wipe away any extra solder hanging around, repeat a couple times. Needs to be reasonable cleaned up for the shark bite to seal.
I request a follow up when you get it fixed T.
 

intlzncster

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#22
I wouldn't plumb a house with them but they're great for emergency repairs.
I typically won't bury them in a wall, but they are probably as dependable as a sweated joint.
Seconded both. They might hold for a long time. But they also have a high failure rate. Ask a good plumber about them.

Never, ever bury them or make it so you can't see what's going on. If something happens, you'll hate your life.

For me, they are solid temporaries. You can take your time getting a more suitable permanent replacement.
 
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#23
Agree with the sentiment above - Sharkbites are really a phenomenal invention - work on CPVC as well as copper. Pricey, so I only use in a time pinch or when positioning is an issue, as in your case.
Be sure to clean the extra solder off the pipe ends when you unsweat that joint - get it hot, use a thick rag (not wet!) to wipe away any extra solder hanging around, repeat a couple times. Needs to be reasonable cleaned up for the shark bite to seal.
I request a follow up when you get it fixed T.
Pricey ($7) compared to a new copper elbow and a little solder. But much cheaper than a plumber.
 
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#24
I woke up to a burst pipe in the basement. It's at an elbow, and 1/2 inch from a joist, so I'm not going to try an solder a new joint.

A guy at Home Depot mentioned a while ago about a reasonably new product called sharkbite. I believe no soldering is needed - cut out the leaking area, and plug in the sharkbite thing.

Has anyone used this before? If so, how'd it work out?
It works fine. You can also use PEX tubing with it. It comes in blue and red for hot and cold water if it makes a diffrence to you. Similar products have been in industry for years. I have mostly used it for air line fittings with plastic tubing. Have the tube and fittings under my kitchen sink. I also put a ball valve past the incoming water valve because they typically leak a bit.
 
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#25
Seconded both. They might hold for a long time. But they also have a high failure rate. Ask a good plumber about them.
I hate to muck up this thread, but . . . they don't have a "high failure rate." If used and installed properly, they are a permanent installation.
Whatever you do, don't ask a plumber about whether these are suitable fittings.
If you do, you might as well ask a Realtor about a sell-your-own-house application. Or ask a primer-making company about primer-in-paint products. Or ask a mechanic about smart-phone based error code readers.
Point is, plumbers hated CPVC and they hate shark bite because it makes them look like they're using, as another poster put it, legos.
And if every homeowner watching sees them cut plastic tube, use glue-on or push-on fittings, and never have to use a flame or an expensive looking tool, then that's really bad for business.
When I plumbed our house, we used CPVC for the whole supply side. At that time, PEX was coming in and copper was on the way out. PEX is fine, but I didn't want to mess with the tool and the clamps. CPVC cost 10% as much as copper, no torch required, flexible, resists freezing, and is permanent - as in, virtually impossible to start leaking after it holds the initial pressure.
Copper - garbage. Super expensive, will develop pinhole leaks downstream from flux deposits, a pain to fix, must have an open system to fix or steam causes pinhole leaks. Every house in my neighborhood in Simsbury, which was built in the 70s, developed pinhole copper plumbing leaks after about 20 or 30 years, and every couple of years somebody would relate a new leak that occurred in the wall or the ceiling.

Plumbers like to pull out the tank and hose and fire up the torch in front of Suzy Homemaker and Joe 6 Pack to remind them to call in the next time they have that leak that could be fixed with an 8 dollar shark bite fitting and 10 minutes of time.

EDIT - BTW, many kitchen faucets and other such parts use push-on fittings under the sink with no issues.
 
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