Prime real estate opportunity in Knoxville | The Boneyard

Prime real estate opportunity in Knoxville

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meyers7

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The commission can stipulate that to the prospective buyer, showing they are committed to all the people its honored, and of course, the Lady Vols.

hmmm, guess that counts us out as buyers.
 

speedoo

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Seriously, why would anyone buy it and be subject to keeping it as the WBHOF? It's obviously not a profitable property as it currently stands.
 

vtcwbuff

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" . . . .commited to the Lady Vols"

Why not just paint it orange and only induct ex UT players?
 

Ruffian75

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Davis says 30,000 people visit the Hall every year.
Burchett couldn't say whether it's lost money for the county.

Burchett couldn't say or wouldn't say? Why would anyone in their right mind spend $3 mil to own a property that attracts only 30,000 a year (800 people a day) and costs $150,000 in yearly subsidies just to have the doors remain open? It costs $8 to get in. That is $240,000 a year. Sounds like a bad investment to me. Do they have a Chick-fil-a there?
 
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Whether in Knoxville or Springfield, MA, I don't think this is the kind of enterprise the city (or State) government should be running.
I don't know why Burchett couldn't tell "chapter and verse" EXACTLY how much ittakes to run this deal. 'Course, that a large part of the problem.

PS: I don't think Governments ought to be underwriting the costs of ANY manner of venue where professional sports are played. Municipal enterprises have a TERRIBLE record of managing these operations.
 

speedoo

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Davis says 30,000 people visit the Hall every year.
Burchett couldn't say whether it's lost money for the county.

Burchett couldn't say or wouldn't say? Why would anyone in their right mind spend $3 mil to own a property that attracts only 30,000 a year (800 people a day) and costs $150,000 in yearly subsidies just to have the doors remain open? It costs $8 to get in. That is $240,000 a year. Sounds like a bad investment to me. Do they have a Chick-fil-a there?

Annual costs: $150k PLUS about $100k in interest. That's $250k a year, vs. $240k in revenue.

The article says the Knoxville Tourism and Sports Commission would buy it for $3 million. Maybe the Knoxville Tourism and Sports Commission can get some government subsidies of its own to run the place more profitably. But that's just moves the red ink for the government from one category to another.

I always thought it was a bad idea, and now it seems more folks in Knoxville would agree.
 

Ruffian75

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Annual costs: $150k PLUS about $100k in interest. That's $250k a year, vs. $240k in revenue.

I always thought it was a bad idea, and now it seems more folks in Knoxville would agree.

Funny thing about sports Hall of Fames......the locations of the big three seem to be where the game originated...Canton (pro football), Springfield, and Cooperstown. I have been to Canton and Cooperstown. I have driven past Springfield 50 times and never stopped. It is a horribly ugly building on the west side of I-91. With the exception of Cooperstown, a truly worthwhile venture, who is going to plan a trip unless it is just a secondary stop on an itinerary or a day trip? I went to Canton because it is 30 miles down the road from my family in Ohio. It basically bored me to death. I wold not have driven from CT to see it.

Now, the Horse Racing Hall Of Fame is perfectly located. It is across the street from God's gift to the sport, Saratoga Racetrack where 30,000 people a day come to watch the greatest race meet in the world for 7 weeks a year.

I have been to Knutsville on a half dozen occasions in the last 10 years. Have I ever gone to the HOF? Nope. I have/had no desire to pay to see old pictures of women in skirts shooting balls at a peach basket. Unlike baseball, football, men's basketball, and horse racing there is not enough history to the sport to make it worth going there.

So Speedo, I agree with you.
 

meyers7

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F I have driven past Springfield 50 times and never stopped. It is a horribly ugly building on the west side of I-91.

I would completely disagree, it is a really cool, unique looking building.

However, the inside, eh, not real interactive, not really super interesting. Been inside a couple times with people who have visited from out of town. I try to dissuade them now, unless they are really into basketball (NBA).

Cooperstown was a let down too. Nostalgic but not all that captivating. Best one I ever went to was the College Football Hall of Fame (back when it was in Ohio). Very interactive, lots of videos.
 
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I visited the WBHOF a few years ago while in Knowxville on business. Its a beautiful place with a lot to see but when I was there, it was entirely empty. It was around 3pm on a weekday though.
 

Icebear

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One could buy the WBHOF and move it to the capital of Women's College Basketball in Storrs, CT and then resell the property.
 

DaddyChoc

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its very kid-friendly... the Springfield site
 

ThisJustIn

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Nope. I have/had no desire to pay to see old pictures of women in skirts shooting balls at a peach basket. Unlike baseball, football, men's basketball, and horse racing there is not enough history to the sport to make it worth going there.

So Speedo, I agree with you.

Actually, the history of women's basketball is just a couple of months shorter than men's basketball and, I think, far more interesting.

I've been to the WBHOF and I find it misses the heart of the history of the came -- the daily fight for the right to exist. The story the WBHOF tells is one of seamless, effortless growth. The real story is of a game with huge popularity (equal to the boys) viciously cut off by small-minded thinkers in positions of power. And the story from the mid-30's to 1978 (the last "senior" aau championship of any import) is one of stubborn women who couldn't NOT play and the visionary men who found a way to get them to play.

I understand the impulses that put it in Knoxville. I think they were earnest and misguided. It's too proper and the WHBOF induction ceremonies are from hunger.

Not sure where I'd have put the HOF. Perhaps if we moved to a rotating host for Final Four?
 

ThisJustIn

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Actually, the history of women's basketball is just a couple of months shorter than men's basketball and, I think, far more interesting.

I've been to the WBHOF and I find it misses the heart of the history of the came -- the daily fight for the right to exist. The story the WBHOF tells is one of seamless, effortless growth. The real story is of a game with huge popularity (equal to the boys) viciously cut off by small-minded thinkers in positions of power. And the story from the mid-30's to 1978 (the last "senior" aau championship of any import) is one of stubborn women who couldn't NOT play and the visionary men who found a way to get them to play.

I understand the impulses that put it in Knoxville. I think they were earnest and misguided. It's too proper and the WHBOF induction ceremonies are from hunger.

Not sure where I'd have put the HOF. Perhaps if we moved to a rotating host for Final Four?

Harumph - I don't see an edit button anymore, so I can't fix my error subtly, so I'll be obvious about it (so Annie Meyers doesn't kick my butt): it was 1979

Turns out Meyers had played for Anna’s Bananas, an AAU team based in California. Coached by her sister Patty and stocked with college players from the Los Angeles area, the Bananas won the AAU Senior Women’s Championships in 1977, ’78 and ’79, the last championships for which AAU named All-Americans. (Kodak first sponsored their All-American team in 1975.)

“That was a group of women that got together, practiced one week before the championship and they won three national championships in a row,” recalled Patty Meyers. “That’s how extremely fabulous they were. They were a very unique group of women.”

Unfortunately, the records I had from the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame had ended in 1976. Oooops.
 

Icebear

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I suspect the system tweak Tom attempted this morning curtailed editing. Oops.
 

meyers7

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Then I guess you are not a baseball fan.

Used to be, but not so much anymore. I think it was more the let down. I expected it to be great, "THE" hall of fame, and it was just so-so.
 
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