OT: Quitting Smoking.

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Mar 16, 2015
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I quit cold turkey in Jan., 2005. Since I had a heart attack in Oct. 2006, I'm glad I did not have to go through quitting at that point.

But here is the strange thing, and I do mean strange. Not once did I experience craving, and I smoked two packs a day for decades. But I know what happened, and what really helped was simply seeing how much money I was saving. Even then, I believe my smokes, Marlboro, were at least $10 a pack. I absolutely loved saving hundreds a month, and making sure I did save that money was the goal line for me. I never lost sight of that goal line.

I guess I'm not offering much help, other then being an example of the fact that "cold turkey" can work. For a long time after, I told all my medical professionals how I quit when they asked if I smoked, and I always said how much I regretted not doing so earlier, since it was so damn easy. I dreaded quitting, thought it would be so difficult, but however one explains it, I am an example of how going cold turkey can be way easier then one would expect. Good luck...
 
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I quit cold turkey in Jan., 2005. Since I had a heart attack in Oct. 2006, I'm glad I did not have to go through quitting at that point.

But here is the strange thing, and I do mean strange. Not once did I experience craving, and I smoked two packs a day for decades. But I know what happened, and what really helped was simply seeing how much money I was saving. Even then, I believe my smokes, Marlboro, were at least $10 a pack. I absolutely loved saving hundreds a month, and making sure I did save that money was the goal line for me. I never lost sight of that goal line.

I guess I'm not offering much help, other then being an example of the fact that "cold turkey" can work. For a long time after, I told all my medical professionals how I quit when they asked if I smoked, and I always said how much I regretted not doing so earlier, since it was so damn easy. I dreaded quitting, thought it would be so difficult, but however one explains it, I am an example of how going cold turkey can be way easier then one would expect. Good luck...
Yeah, I quit in March 2014, for almost 2 1/2 years. Started a couple years ago. It is a struggle but does not feel insurmountable.
 
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74 days deep. No further transgressions. Feeling pretty good about this. Thanks to all for your support.
It's kinda.fun at this point - and maybe helpful - to review all the positive changes in your body that have happened and are still happening...

https://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/what-happens-body-quit-smoking

2 Weeks - 3 Months
During this time, you make huge strides. You can do more because your lungs are stronger and clearer, and your blood flow has improved. You can exercise without getting as winded. And your risk of a heart attack goes down even more.

You’ve also made it through the hardest part of withdrawal.

Even so, you’ll probably still get cravings. Everyone has different triggers for wanting to smoke. You can’t stop all of them, but you can stick to your plan. Ask for help if you need it. Think about the money you’re saving. Or try 10 deep breaths, nice and slow.
 
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