OT: Metal Roofs

Discussion in 'Off Topic Archive' started by temery, Jul 31, 2016.

  1. temery

    temery What?

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    My house needs a new roof. Anyone here with a metal roof? The damage done due to ice dams over the past few years has taken its toll. Is a metal roof worth considering?
     
  2. uconnfan68

    uconnfan68

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    Thought seriously about it, but went conventional for cost. Seeing them more and more, especially up north (NH). Definitely should evaluate.
     
  3. Devland

    Devland

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    One of my neighbors bought one at a home show a few years back. This one was advertised as a "space age" material that snow does not stick to(the brand name was something like interlok). His problem now is if we get a significant storm, it sometimes all comes down at once. I was outside after one of the more significant storms we had a couple of years ago and heard a loud sound. I turned around and saw that all the snow from his roof was piled in a seven foot high snow bank on the walkway that ran along the front of his house. In my opinion someone standing on that walk way could have been seriously hurt. Now it doesn't collect on the roof and release all at once for every storm. Some storms it doesn't accumulate on the roof at all. It depends on the exact weather conditions. You may want to look around for houses that have the metal roofs installed and then ask the homeowner for their opinions.
     
  4. MTHusky

    MTHusky UCONN Grad class of 1970

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    Most metal roofs we see in MT will have dam's on the roof to prevent or deflect the snow/ice from sliding onto walkways.
     
  5. outsidethebox

    outsidethebox

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    Most ice dams are caused by heat loss. Check insulation in areas of dams. When re-roofing have installer put 6 feet of ice and water shield along perimeter of house and in valleys. Pay extra for this and enjoy leak free home.
     
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  6. Fishy

    Fishy Puncher of Throats

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    Most regular dams are caused by beavers.

    Try to keep them off the roof.
     
  7. SubbaBub

    SubbaBub Your stupidity is ruining my country.

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    How long to you need it to last?
    Is excessive snow load a problem (i.e., do you need it to slide off), if your roof is flat, then this isn't a benefit.

    They last longer, are more expensive, are architecturally more palatable in northern, woodsy climates, they make a good (loud) noise during storms.
     
  8. Northbound

    Northbound

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    They are loud that I know. I've thought about it too, log house and at some point I'll need to redo the roof and there's some wacky angles, but having friends with them they are loud as hell.

    I also have an ice dam where roofs from three angles come together it's a mess and I'm inevitably on a ladder with a sledge once a year, wow does it suck. Less to do with heat loss in my instance and more to do with angles.
     
  9. RichZ

    RichZ Methuselah's older brother

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    Ice dams are usually related to an overhang that doesn't get heat, and what is melting gets frozen there, then puddles build up behind it and seep under the shingles.

    My kid lives in VT, and many of his neighbors and co workers have metal roofs. They don't put them on roofs with too low a pitch, because slow pitch roofs are prone to the build-up and sudden slide referenced above. And there are some newer (and more expensive) metal roofs that are not nearly as noisy.
     
  10. Dove

    Dove Vance comin'

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    Tom, if you avoid wrought iron then that will be a good thing. Just a tip.
     
  11. temery

    temery What?

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    This is the first I've heard of a metal roof being noisy. If it'll bother my neighbors, I'm all in.
     
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  12. Hoophound

    Hoophound

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    Our second home has a standing seam metal roof with a pretty steep pitch. The snow slides off and piles up around the house. It is only an issue on the deck, as it can really pile up there and it becomes heavy if allowed to keep accumulating even in winters with less snow than average.

    Rain creates some noise but nothing that bothers us. It can also be a little noisy in sleet/hail. The noise level in the house will really depend on insulation and other factors but I don't consider it a detractor at all. Overall, it is the best roof you can get but be careful, prices will vary tremendously. I've seen prices between 12 and 37k for the same job.
     
  13. Dogdeacon

    Dogdeacon

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    You'll have to either invite your neighbors over or I dunno, couple quick throat punches & then bound & tie them up in the attic. It is a 'When a Stranger Calls' kind of noise = coming from INSIDE the house.
     
  14. Northbound

    Northbound

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    My experience in terms of sounds was just recent actually - a friend has a place in the NC mountains that he built about 3 years ago, visited this summer and it rained and you could here it, but that wasn't unexpected, what struck me was the sound when it was being heated by the sun. It was something I didn't expect and that actually made me re-think the roof for our Upstate place. I haven't entirely ruled it out, so it must not have been that bad in hindsight.
     
  15. Hoophound

    Hoophound

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    My roof makes no noise when being heated by the sun. There are installation methods available that account for expansion and contraction to avoid noises. The noise you heard is strain on the metal because there was no accommodation made for expansion in warmth.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2016
  16. Padutch5

    Padutch5

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    Nt sure I understand the concern about noise from the heat. After the Hurricanes KRW tore up the pretty tile roofs acrosss Florida several years ago, many home and condo owners replaced them with metal roofs since they hold up to wind much better. I've never heard any complaints about heat noise or, for that matter,rain noise. I suspect it's all in how they are installed.
     
  17. NJHusky

    NJHusky

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    My cabin in Vermont has a traditional shingle roof, but the lower 6 feet are metal...kind of a hybrid...it was that way when I bought it...the prior owner probably did only the lower 6 feet to save money....It keeps snow from piling up on the lower eaves of the house....but I do use a heating element on it.

    The main downside is the snow piles up..but for our place this isn't an issue. When i redo the roof I will do it the same way...don't want to spring for a full metal roof but still like having the benefit
     
  18. Conndog

    Conndog

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    I live in southern New Hampshire and we are going to install a new roof. Still debating between conventional shingles (architectural 30-year) and standing seam metal. The metal roof would cost about $7-8 thousand more, but it lasts 50 years supposedly, you don't have to ventilate under the roof (with conventional shingles to get the warranty you should, it isn't always possible or easy), and you get the benefit of having a metal snowbelt along the edge without having to pay additionally for it. We are insulating first and estimates are between $10-15 thousand for that. Our house is beautiful but 200 years old, it has uninsulated double brick walls- feel like Tom Hanks in the Money Pit.
     
  19. VPDcurt

    VPDcurt

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    I lived in NH for a year and heard a lot about the metal...one of the downsides I've heard repeated over and over is the difficulty of obtaining a strong cell phone signal while inside the house. Not sure if this is true or not but something to consider - especially in a place like NH where the cell service can be a bit spotty in some areas.
     
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