Need Book Recomendations, I'm stuck inside

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It’s not fiction but Unbroken is the most amazing true story you will ever read.
It’s not fiction but Unbroken is the most amazing true story you will ever read.
[/QUOTE

i read this a few years ago and have it say I have some doubts. Not saying it is all untrue but seems a little Papillon ish to me. A bit too fantastical. Maybe I am wrong.. i am not saying it is all untrue. But embellished. To the person who was surprised that Cryptonomicon was mentioned on the Boneyard I guess they were not reading Boneyard about 3 yrs ago
 
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Some more popular/classic ones. Worth reading if you haven't crossed them off your list yet.

  • John Irving - A Prayer for Owen Meany, The Cider House Rules.
  • John Steinbeck - East of Eden. My favorite novel. Bonus points for its opening chapters taking place in Connecticut.
  • Cormac McCarthy - Blood Meridian. Crazy, crazy book. The Road would be an appropriate read during these weird times. More than any other book, I was surprised at how much I enjoyed The Road. People seem to love it or hate it.
  • Philip Roth - The Plot Against America. The HBO series just launched. Roth was such a gifted writer. Might be up your alley since you like Follett.
  • If you really want to kill some time you can go through John Updike's Rabbit tetralogy. He's as talented a writer as there was during the 20th century IMO. Most of the characters are deplorable but if that doesn't bother you they're great reads.
  • Since you mentioned Follett, I enjoyed The Eye of the Needle (a rare quick/short Follett read). Quite different from The Pillars of the Earth, etc. but it's good.
Haven’t read it in about 50 years But always have had a soft spot for Steinbeck’s Winter of our Discontent. Have to admit East of Eden was my favorite book for a long time
 
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Assuming you read the century trilogy by Follet. Several have mentioned the pillars of the earth by follet which also has 3 books (pillars, a world without end and a column of fire) and a fourth coming later this year if I recall. Great one off read from follet is a dangerous fortune.

Also voting for the Michael Connely books (Bosch and Lincoln lawyer).
 
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A second vote for A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles.
Fat City by Leonard Gardner
The Anthologist by Nicholson Baker
 

Sibeerian

Thinks the tough sledding may soon be over
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I’ve recommended this before but the Master Commander series by Patrick O’Brian is a favorite of mine. It is excellent.

For the genre you like you can’t go wrong with Tom Clancy. Start with The Hunt for Red October.
I want to second the Patrick O'Brian recommendation, the inspiration for the "Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World" film with Russell Crowe. Historical fiction. Known also as the Aubrey and Maturin series. If you get into it, it will keep you busy for a long time. About a British navy officer climbing the ranks alongside his friend the ship's surgeon/naturalist. The author doesn't cut you any slack - he just drops you into the era and you have to let all the period language and seafaring jargon wash over you and enjoy the story and humor. The first book is Master and Commander.
 
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James Clavell.....Shogun, one of the best books of all time.....The Noble House Series starting with Taipan going all the way thru Gai-Jin....Was anxiously expecting the last book in the series....sadly he died before it was finished. Also, King Rat, a story about a WWII POW Camp in Singapore....ALL GREAT reads!
 

CL82

The best thing about puppies is they become dogs!
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James Clavell.....Shogun, one of the best books of all time.....The Noble House Series starting with Taipan going all the way thru Gai-Jin....Was anxiously expecting the last book in the series....sadly he died before it was finished. Also, King Rat, a story about a WWII POW Camp in Singapore....ALL GREAT reads!
Noble House is an outstanding series. Never got around to Shogun. Thanks for the reminder.
 
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Haven’t read it in about 50 years But always have had a soft spot for Steinbeck’s Winter of our Discontent. Have to admit East of Eden was my favorite book for a long time
I really liked Winter as well. It was his last novel, correct? He's one of the very few authors that I can read absolutely anything by them and enjoy it.
 
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Here are some non fiction possibilities. "Playing for Pizza"by John Grisham is the true story of Rick Dockery whose performance in the Super Bowl was so awful that no team wanted him. His agent finds him a job as the quarterback for the Parma Panthers. That's Parma, Italy. This is really enjoyable.

The Making of a Chef by Michael Ruhlman details his experiences as a student at the Culinary Institute of America. If you have an interest in the subject;this is compelling reading.

Roger Ebert's"The Great Movies." There are 4 volumes. The first 3 have one hundred newly written reviews. The final volume has only 60+ reviews. The completion was interrupted by Ebert's death. I have all four volumes, but for most of you, go to RogerEbert.com all the reviews are there. There is a special section for the Great Movies. IMO Ebert is the best critic. He writes really well;he understands film, and he has the ability to clarify things for the reader.
 

CL82

The best thing about puppies is they become dogs!
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I really liked Winter as well. It was his last novel, correct? He's one of the very few authors that I can read absolutely anything by them and enjoy it.
I feel like you should have a bowl full of anti-depressants to munch on when you read Steinbeck. Of Mice and Men and The Pearl come to mind as books that you finish up thinking "Really? Really dude? You had to do that?" Excellent author though.
 
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I feel like you should have a bowl full of anti-depressants to munch on when you read Steinbeck. Of Mice and Men and The Pearl come to mind as books that you finish up thinking "Really? Really dude? You had to do that?" Excellent author though.
Agreed. Same with much of John Updike and John Cheever for me. Is it just 20th-century writers named John? lol. I love all three but have had to take a break from each for my own mental health. For whatever reason I'm drawn to depressing books. Maybe it's the type of book that elicits emotions the most for me (or the easiest).
 

storrsroars

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The Making of a Chef by Michael Ruhlman details his experiences as a student at the Culinary Institute of America. If you have an interest in the subject;this is compelling reading.
Excellent book, as is Rulman's "The Soul of a Chef". The third and final in that series, "The Reach of a Chef" is a bit more esoteric and inside baseball, but still great for food professionals and wannabe pros.

And as long as we're on food, have to give a nod to Bourdain's classic "Kitchen Confidential".
 

David 76

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A third for the a master and Commander series. Read them all.

Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, The Winter of our discontent and To a God Unknown, are my favorites. The novelettes (Pearl, Red Pony, Mice and Men are good but not as good, same with the Chicano series ( plus politically incorrect).
Heard his war stuff is great but hard to find.
 
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Have to check out the JFK book. Still remember that day. Another incredible JFK book is The Inheritance: Poisoned fruit of the JFK assassination.
It's good - and legit. I know Jimmy (now 78, exceptionally bright and honest) and he talks about stuff that is quite shocking. He has told me other things that are not in the book - that are truly horrific and almost unbelievable. The folks here struggle with things that are nearly unbelievable. (Trust me - I get it. I'd probably be the same way.) I'll leave you with a couple thoughts which are true - but it's up to you as whether you choose to believe them. Do I have evidence and proof? Actually, I do - but this not the forum for it. Jimmy and others have told me about selection. The intellect of an individual (selected) must be exceptional. Lee Oswald was very intelligent - but still fooled - internally within his compartment. Jimmy said that America has absolutely no idea what is going behind the scenes of many components within our government. They are all so compartmentalized so that - the president and others are completely unaware. Brilliant coverup and cleanup teams 'manage' situations from there. For example: why does no one talk about the 28 people there in the plaza that died mysteriously over the next couple of years? (9/11 was no different.) They saw something they were not supposed to. Silenced - to use their term. As far as the 3 tiered plan on Jack - plans A and B failed - C was a guarantee. Proof? Yep. Where did it come from? From the only one that knows true history. The Who, what, where and most importantly why - will exposed relatively soon. There 2 pieces in the book that are not correct from lack of information on Jimmy's part. 1) The person who killed JD Tippit was partially right 2) Jimmy did hit Jack in the head - but that is not what killed him. Again, compartmentalization and lack of information. Proof through divination?

Have to check out the JFK book. Still remember that day. Another incredible JFK book is The Inheritance: Poisoned fruit of the JFK assassination.
 

joober jones

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Do you like non-fiction/biographies? If so I have some suggestions
 
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Agreed. Same with much of John Updike and John Cheever for me. Is it just 20th-century writers named John? lol. I love all three but have had to take a break from each for my own mental health. For whatever reason I'm drawn to depressing books. Maybe it's the type of book that elicits emotions the most for me (or the easiest).
The Rabbit Angstrom books are so good.
 
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The Rabbit Angstrom books are so good.
Thanks!

What most don't realize is just how sophisticated this is - but you eventually will. There are truly brilliant, frightening, misguided people on this planet. And, obviously, they have been able to fool everyone - until now. The greatest power is exposing all the tiny little mistakes they have made. And Although not today, there will be proof (necessary for the egotistical human condition) - and provided at the right moment in time. Have a few seen the video and supporting documentation (removed upon Trump's victory in 2016) - the answer is - yes to all. These books just further confirm the evidence. I recommend them - highly. Have a blessed day. Now back to basketball...

The Rabbit Angstrom books are so good.
 

TRest

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Late to the party but the Robert Parker mysteries (Spenser) are like junk food, go down easy and quick.

When I was rehabbing my knee reconstruction I read Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. That and her first The Secret History are just gorgeous writing.
 
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Husky Mania by former Courant writer Jim Shea.

Picked this one up in a feverish book spree mere minutes before my library closed indefinitely.

Written in 1995, it's a history on how UConn basketball became a powerhouse, but more interestingly it's a time capsule to see what was predicted and what actually has happened over the last 25 years.
 
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Ozarks, the outsiders, Billions, better call Saul, power, then if u really wanna go old school: sopranos, the wire, entourage, Rome, deadwood/ the Chi and snowfall are really good too. Oh wait u meant reading? Sorry. Lol.
 

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