OT: (Ish) Rebounding Technique

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For the coaches out there:

How are you teaching rebounding?

Old school:
- step across
- elbows up
- push back
- get the ball

This kind of rebounding is very horizontal. The whole team is supposed to create a shell with their man so everyone on offense is inside the defender before grabbing the board.

Some coaches even teach to hold the box out after the ball has hit the rim, even hit the ground. Some also teach a complete box out OUTSIDE the 3 pt line.

Think Kevin Love.

New school (how I teach):

Ball goes up, you hit a body with a forearm and pursue the ball immediately.

This style is less about technique. More about athleticism and mentality.

Think Rodman.

What are you all doing?
 

RichZ

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I was taught to put my left knee into contact with the back side of my guy's right knee, and plant my leg firmly. (if on the right side of lane - reverse if on other.) Most guys flex their leg before going up. Knee in the back of his is supposed to keep him from getting leg fully extended to drive his jump. Never worked the timing of the move out properly until a dozen years later in adult rec league, but when it worked, it was effective.
 

CL82

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Make contact (box out) (butt out, on his leg)
Wait for the ball to cross your shoulder.
Release and pursue ball.
 
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I was taught to put my left knee into contact with the back side of my guy's right knee, and plant my leg firmly. (if on the right side of lane - reverse if on other.) Most guys flex their leg before going up. Knee in the back of his is supposed to keep him from getting leg fully extended to drive his jump. Never worked the timing of the move out properly until a dozen years later in adult rec league, but when it worked, it was effective.
Make contact (box out) (butt out, on his leg)
Wait for the ball to cross your shoulder.
Release and pursue ball.
Yeah, these are both old school. Definitely has its place, but I wonder how effective that is for hs players.

I'm just trying to decide how to teach this. I spend 10 mins every single practice on rebounding, and want to use that time wisely
 

nelsonmuntz

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Rodman.

It is such a perimeter and dribble drive game today that it is really hard to create a shell.
 

RichZ

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Yeah, these are both old school. Definitely has its place, but I wonder how effective that is for hs players.

I'm just trying to decide how to teach this. I spend 10 mins every single practice on rebounding, and want to use that time wisely
Well, that's how I was taught in HS. But then again, it was a decade or more before I managed to used it effectively on more than an occasional basis.
 
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I would shy away from any rebounding technique that involves going at the other players' knees, especially if you are coaching girls.
Some guys teach to step across the other players foot. Never heard of the knee thing, but i Agree
 
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For a true post guy it’s really a continuation of his pre shot positioning except turning and creating even more body contact. Chief agrees use your butt to create space , elbows out but forearms facing up, eyes on ball and rim to judge direction of ball after hitting rim. Create a bias toward the other side of rim from shot - where most rebounds go - if shots are from the side.
Finally, want the ball more than your opponent and be thinking outlet pass and fast break before even getting the ball.
 

CL82

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Yeah, these are both old school. Definitely has its place, but I wonder how effective that is for hs players.

I'm just trying to decide how to teach this. I spend 10 mins every single practice on rebounding, and want to use that time wisely
The big thing that I think kids forget about is that rebounding isn’t just about getting the ball. It is also about keeping your man from getting the ball. These “old-school” positioning tips will help them do just that.
 
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The big thing that I think kids forget about is that rebounding isn’t just about getting the ball. It is also about keeping your man from getting the ball. These “old-school” positioning tips will help them do just that.
Agreed on the interior. But what about these coaches teaching a traditional box out at the 3 point line?
 

UC313

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Im a step on his foot,Thumb hook to the waistband and a hip check kinda guy. Montoe Park taught.
 

nelsonmuntz

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The old school method of boxing out even if the ball hit the floor belongs in the history books with the two handed shot. The 3 point shot pulls defenses so far away from the basket that creating a "shell" is impossible. Having guards run out to the 3 point line to try to box someone out is silly. Also, long shots lead to long rebounds, making the shell more useless. I have my forwards box out, and then everyone else bumps a guy and goes after the ball.

I want the box out to set up around 5 feet. If the opposing player wants to stand under the basket, let him. Aren't a lot of rebounds right under the rim.

On the offensive boards, I like crashing rather than position rebounding. Do not engage with the defender if you can avoid it. The defender is already between his man and the basket, so he starts with the advantage. Don't try to out muscle the defender because then he knows where you are. Avoid contact with the defensive rebounder if possible.

2-3 zone defensive rebounding is tougher. The baseline players have to find a body, because all it takes is one guy not doing his/her job and there will be a lot of second chance shots.

defensive rebounding is a challenge in 3-2 and 1-3-1 defenses. Communication is really important in those defenses because a lot of times players don't even know the shot is up.
 
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The old school method of boxing out even if the ball hit the floor belongs in the history books with the two handed shot. The 3 point shot pulls defenses so far away from the basket that creating a "shell" is impossible. Having guards run out to the 3 point line to try to box someone out is silly. Also, long shots lead to long rebounds, making the shell more useless. I have my forwards box out, and then everyone else bumps a guy and goes after the ball.

I want the box out to set up around 5 feet. If the opposing player wants to stand under the basket, let him. Aren't a lot of rebounds right under the rim.

On the offensive boards, I like crashing rather than position rebounding. Do not engage with the defender if you can avoid it. The defender is already between his man and the basket, so he starts with the advantage. Don't try to out muscle the defender because then he knows where you are. Avoid contact with the defensive rebounder if possible.

2-3 zone defensive rebounding is tougher. The baseline players have to find a body, because all it takes is one guy not doing his/her job and there will be a lot of second chance shots.

defensive rebounding is a challenge in 3-2 and 1-3-1 defenses. Communication is really important in those defenses because a lot of times players don't even know the shot is up.
To some extent, these were KO’s rebounding theories.
 
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Im a step on his foot,Thumb hook to the waistband and a hip check kinda guy. Montoe Park taught.
LOL. Whatever it takes. When the opponent goes up for the rebound, pull down the shorts, grab the rebound and run up the court before anyone can call a foul.

Hey, it works during pickup..
 

nelsonmuntz

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Im a step on his foot,Thumb hook to the waistband and a hip check kinda guy. Montoe Park taught.
That is fine when you are playing with your friends, but I would not recommend that at a city playground unless you have a really good dental plan.
 
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Make contact (box out) (butt out, on his leg)
Wait for the ball to cross your shoulder.
Release and pursue ball.
Rebounding is about breaking the opponents will. If you keep putting your backside into your opponents thigh, most opponents back off as the game progresses
 
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It's pretty simple if everyone does it - find someone near you hit them first, butt in the groin preferably and if everyone does their job the rebound should be yours 80% of the time. How many long rebounds do we see because a guard kind of wanders into the lane without a plan, if you get a hand in the shooters face you should still get your body on him. It's effort, it's habit and it works most of time for the good of the team. Our guys do too much of just touching on the box outs, need to move them back so they can't jump where they want to, bet them off balance with a nice back up.

Many of these great athletes think they can just jump to the ball and get the rebound because sometimes it works, but they'd all be double digit rebounders with better technique and effort to be the best.
 
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The old school method of boxing out even if the ball hit the floor
This was my least favorite drill from my playing days.

One man up, everyone else in line at the top of the key. Coach takes a shot, the one man up has to box out the first guy in line but can't touch/rebound the ball, his only responsibility is boxing out - typically until the ball went out of bounds, past halfcourt or the coach felt it was time to stop. Had to stop three consecutive guys to get out. That drill was murder on the guards; coaches never called fouls of course so it led to some nasty shoving-in-the-back stuff but certainly built toughness.
 

CL82

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Rebounding is about breaking the opponents will. If you keep putting your backside into your opponents thigh, most opponents back off as the game progresses
I've told kids, especially one who were undersized to "sit on (the defender's) leg." It is an easy enough concept, and entirely effective even when the defender is undersized.
 
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Yeah, these are both old school. Definitely has its place, but I wonder how effective that is for hs players.

I'm just trying to decide how to teach this. I spend 10 mins every single practice on rebounding, and want to use that time wisely
I coach the forearm make contact technique and do a start from under basket rebound drill (1 pass out to shooter at foul line , 2shooter shoots, 3 rebounder must close out & make contact or do it again? 4 pursue ball).
Second drill is put Balll on ground player closer to ball must keep opponent from It for count of 3 one-thousand.
I’m coaching 6th-7th graders and most are all still prairie dogs when ball goes up. A few big guys get it. Only foul shots do they really consistently execute.
 

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