getting dirty: what's in the garden?

ClifSpliffy

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the ground has been warmer than normal since last fall, so we bumped up planting by two weeks this season (the field brown turkey figs got moving weeks before usual), and the stuff shows it, but we're bringing the water early cuz the rain has not been co-operating. the pickling cukes, hand tomatoes of various colors (no cherries or grape ones this year), and cantelopes are running nicely, and we'll be dropping in the jalapenos today.
ganims in fairdale has a really good potting soil mix, full of lobster shells and such, that he makes up in maine. that stuff seemed to wake up some old seeds that i thought were done. it feels like that 'dirt' could be magic for flowers.
get those seeds started!
 

ClifSpliffy

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planting advice from Farmers' Supply and Roofing Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut.
looks like they have that brand new variety of lettuce seed this year;
'Iceberg. New. Of beautiful appearance and excellent quality; leaves green, slightly tinted with red at the edge; of good size and solid.
It is bound to be a leader. Pkt. 5 cts., oz
'
but it doesn't look like cantaloupe has been invented yet, so we're stuck with muskmelon till then. lol.
some interesting tips in here, like, rip up a piece of sod, turn it over - voila! seed starter! pretty slick.
[Farmers' Supply & Roofing Co. materials] [electronic resource] : Farmers' Supply & Roofing Co : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive
they even sold a grass seed called 'Brooklawn,' named after the nearby Brooklawn Country Club, where it was developed.
 

cockhrnleghrn

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I forgot in my last response: Paw paws are native fruit. They are literally about half fruit and half seed on the inside, which is probably why they're not marketed, but they're really really delicious. They kind of taste like a cross between a banana and mango. They do have a wikipedia page. They're probably about 4-6 inches long when ripe; here is a pic when they're babies, maybe 3/4-1" long.
View attachment 67595
I looked them up and they apparently grow in my neck of the woods, but I don't recall hearing about them before. I wonder if they sell them at grocery stores?
 
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Marsh marigolds. Took over my backyard. Encroaching on the front yard. Impossible to kill off. Taking over the entire neighborhood.

Really insidious.
 
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My garden is ridiculous. The flower section, English garden style, runs 250 feet, from 15 to 30 feet wide. Veggies are in raised beds, 14 tomatoes, a dozen peppers, two large beds of Jerusalem artichokes, two beds of beans, green and wax, cukes, melons, etc. I live in low Rockies so am still zone 6a.
 

ClifSpliffy

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in keeping with the 'ground is warm' thinking, we finished putting in another planting of tomatos, cukes, and such aboot 10 days or so ago. we've never had sooo many peppers, green and jalapeños, table ready this early. gonna be interesting to see how the late-planted cantelopes work out.
here come the raspberries! time to drop some soft maples for next springs' firewood!
 

ClifSpliffy

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On my morning walk today, I foraged 26 dry ounces of wild raspberries. Maybe I'm just paying more attention this year, but it seems like wild berries are growing like crazy.
yes, yes they are. common thought heard around my area this season -'can u believe that there are now raspberries there, there, there, there, and over there?' they had a head of steam going way before the rains set in this summer. i'm stickin with my 'the ground has been unusually warm since last fall' thing.
make the jam!
 

ClifSpliffy

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update on second planting, post Independence Day stuff. pretty darn good. those cukes and tomatos are coming along nicely as the first planting harvest is coming to a close, but with some rains coming back (so far his year: drought, big water, then drought again, now some rain) they may catch a break and put out some moar. those second cukes held up well, no bitterness, coming off those weeks of limited rain, tho it did cause the burrowing wasps to show up again.
mushrooms started to calm down, but again, this rain will prolly cause them to return. i still ain't eating them.
second plant cantaloupes looking good, too, so reason now to net/protect them from the varmints. that's the only problem with the lopes around here, as they almost grow on autopilot, with mostly just uninvited critters messin them up. it really stinks to find a bunch of them lookin good only to find some chewed on the underside. i mean, 4 or 5 in a row with some chomps on them -aaaarrrrggggghhhhh! why couldn't you just stick to one, varmint? 3 years running now (never happened before) where bambi has a seemingly new found taste in brown turkey fig leaves. wild grapes and cherries in the forest seem to be having a good year, honeysuckle too. bigtime bat resurgence, gettin fat on skeeters. not a squirrel year so far. good.
 

ClifSpliffy

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october 4, green and jalopena peppers still puttin out like a censured... well, u know what i mean. they started early, and have never stopped. amazing.
no special treatment -field grown, mostly rain for irrigation.
ground is still warm, and looking out a week or so, it doesn't present much of a chance for lows in the 40's. the soft maple leaves can't even spell, much less actually turn, red, at this point.
and, wholly consistent with the 'berries everrwhere' theme of earlier, the autumn olive/russian olive/winterberry/whatever it's called, has put out a giant, heavy, crop like, umm, well you know... fun fact. those berries are one of the most dense lycopene producers on the planet.
 

ClifSpliffy

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i'll tell ya what's 'in da garden,' and everrwhere else. obvious to the non-somnambulant. worm castings. epic this year.
worm castings 'tea' (huck some in a 5 gal bucket, add water, let sit for a few days. voila! liquid superfert! free), or straight added to soil, the stuff is, well,
What Are Worm Castings - How To Make Worm Castings (gardeningknowhow.com)
forget the part aboot making the castings. just walk outside, bend down, and pick up.
around 50 bucks per gallon for the tea iffn u buy it retail.
madness.
 
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ClifSpliffy

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10/21. no letup in both jalapeno and california wonder peppers, tho the jalaps are turning color, purpleish/redbrownish 'stripes.' still a few of hand and plum tomatos hanging on, mostly greenish in declining vigor, but i did pick some ok reds and yellows today. the water has been kind of light, so i may actually water them.
regular warmish ocean breezes pushing back on any big cold trying to travel down the Connecticut River, so annuals are in no rush to quit, and the deer act like they're on vacation. lots of warm weather birds hanging around.
tasty scup on the dinner plate lately too. the beaver have returned this season, along with a growing bat population. mosquitos can do that, ya know. i hope someone tells that to the 'enviro types.'
 
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