Dual Passports?

Discussion in 'Travel' started by UConnTrumbull, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. UConnTrumbull

    UConnTrumbull

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    Does anyone have two or more passports?
    Are there benefits or complications to having more than one?

    Note: US citizen with American passport
    Dual citizen of Portugal, no EU passport
     
  2. Samoo

    Samoo

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    It is useful if you do a lot of weird travel, like going to Eritrea after travelling to Ethiopia on your US PPT. With the way things are going with our former allies in the EU it might be worth having. An EU passport also allows you to be present in the EU for longer than six months in a one year period, and you can work there without any problems. You always need to enter and leave the US on your American PPT.
     
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  3. Da_Aisijimo_Gou

    Da_Aisijimo_Gou

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    Massive benefits! Travelers from Singapore, Japan, Swiss, and EU Ireland are generally well liked and their respective passports' hugely beneficial. Singaporean and Japanese passport holders can now travel / enter visa-free to at least 180 nations (more than even German EU and current UK EU passport holders). Both can also enter China without visas for up to about 2 weeks (travel, business, family visit, etc).

    Another obvious example: travel to the Middle East and Israel for business. Use only one nation's passport ("A") ever to enter Israel; refrain from using that particular nation's passport when applying for visas or entering many other nations in the region. Use a second passport (nation "B") when traveling elsewhere in the region. Many other examples exist.
     
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  4. Da_Aisijimo_Gou

    Da_Aisijimo_Gou

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    @UConnTrumbull Neglected a couple slam dunks for a Yank-passport holding, dual citizen of Portugal without an EU passport. Obtain an EU passport and consequently convenient eligibility to work, likely buy property, retire full or part year in Portugal and potentially related benefits albeit with more hoops to jump through elsewhere in EU nations.

    No ill intent, but ideally Spain wins tomorrow and the Spaniards and Moroccans advance. OK, Portugal may sneak past iran and scrape into the knockout phase with Group B third place finish. Just bustin' 'em!
     
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  5. progrocks

    progrocks

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    The passport that is hard to recommend if you already have another is the USA one. I know of no reason not to get an EU one if you want to possibly live over there as long as the country does not have mandatory military service or something.* If you are not making money there you have no taxes. For the USA you have to file no matter where you are.

    *Not Legal Advice
     
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  6. Da_Aisijimo_Gou

    Da_Aisijimo_Gou

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    Like the USSA, Eritrea is one of the few nations globally imposing taxes based on their citizenship instead of actual residency., e.g., whether living in the States, a US territory, or anywhere in the world. And, that ignores laborious reporting for US citizens of non-US bank, brokerage, etc accounts held outside the US. To the best of my knowledge, no other nation taxes citizens or dual-income passport holders living abroad.

    Instead of the US income tax filing requirement and potential income taxes imposed regardless of global location, Eritrea charges a special 2% tax on all Eritreans and dual-nationals living outside its' borders. How Eritrea imposes and collects their special tax is a different subject for a different day. ;(