Big Ten passes SEC in total revenue by $132 million in 2017-18

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According to USA Today, the conference raked in a revenue of $759 million during the 2018 fiscal year, up 45 percent from the $512.9 million from the previous season. Twelve of the 14 member institutions will take home a paycheck of a little over $54 million, with Rutgers and Maryland receiving a smaller share due to their transition to the conference in 2014.
The massive dollar figure tops the SEC's 2017-18 fiscal revenue by a whopping $131.9 million. The SEC announced in February that it brought in $627.1 million, and doled out just over $43.1 million per school.
 
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I saw this posted on a Rutgers board. Not sure of the source, but it looks accurate:

Rutgers distributions from Big Ten:
2015 $8,645,986
2016 $9,043,606
2017 $9,442,178
2018 $23,841,721 ($9,841,721 + $14,000,000 loan)
2019 $26,242,246 ($10,242,246 + $13,000,000 loan + $3,000,000 advance)
2020 $28,643,801 [FY 2020 starts on July 1, 2019]
2021 $43,705,600
2022 $46,029,566
2023 $48,941,204
2024 $50,970,215
2025 $53,055,193
2026 $56,178,379
2027 $65,238,659 [First year of full share; all loans and advances paid off]
2028 $67,195,819
2029 $69,211,694
 
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Interesting that they are forecasting revues out to 2029 when their TV contract expires in 2023.

Seems like some big assumptions being made
 
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The B1G should have given Rutgers a 200 Year Transition Plan to full payout. By that time they might actually be able to contribute on a conference court or field in something.
 
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The Big Ten's transition plans always guarantee that the newly added school never receives less money than they received in their previous conference, and each new school has had different arrangements because of that. Maryland has been paid more by the Big Ten than Rutgers during the transition because Maryland made more money in the ACC than Rutgers made in the Big East/AAC. Maryland and Rutgers have each taken out loans from the Big Ten that will be paid back later during this transition phase, while Nebraska was financially strong enough to never need a loan from the conference during its transitional phase.

So let's say in theory that the Big Ten added Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and UConn. Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas make way more in the Big 12 than UConn makes in the AAC, so it is safe to assume that UConn would be paid much less during their "buy in" period in the Big Ten than the other schools. But after that buy in period, all schools would be paid equally.
 

Fishy

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Maryland was paid more than Rutgers because Maryland was the goal and Rutgers was their plus-1.

Maryland had actual leverage whereas any Big East school would have had absolutely zero. Rutgers was just a zip code near NYC as far as the Big Ten was concerned.
 

CL82

July 1, 2020 - Let the countdown begin!
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Maryland was paid more than Rutgers because Maryland was the goal and Rutgers was their plus-1.

Maryland had actual leverage whereas any Big East school would have had absolutely zero. Rutgers was just a zip code near NYC as far as the Big Ten was concerned.
Maryland was paid more because they borrowed less for the transition. We like to make fun of Rutty here, but they did exactly what they were supposed to do, namely get the BTN into the NYC DMA at a premium subscriber rate. Any more Rutty did from that point out would have been gravy.
 
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Fishy

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Maryland was paid more because they borrowed less for the transition. We like to make fun of Rutty here, but they did exactly what they were supposed to do, namely get the BTN into the NYC DMA at a premium subscriber rate. Anymore more Rutty did from that point out would have been gravy.
Hence the comment that Rutgers was nothing more than a zip code.

Rutgers got into the Big Ten decades ago when someone decided that the NYC DMA should extend south instead of north or west.
 
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Is the ACC on espn +. ? LoL
I assume that this is facetious...but in the very small chance that it is not...

The ACCN will be just like the SECN...and will have an ACCN+ that corresponds to the conference branded sections of the ESPN+.

1. What is the difference between SEC Network, SEC Network+ and SEC Network Alternate Channel?

SEC Network is a live 24-hour television network.

SEC Network Alternate is an overflow television channel. It is not live 24 hours a day. Content only appears on the channel on occasion when games overlap.

SEC Network+ provides thousands of additional digital only events to fans through the ESPN App on smartphones, tablets and OTT streaming devices and on computers via ESPN.com. SEC Network+ is not a television channel.

3. ESPN+ is a paid subscription. Do I have to pay separately to access SEC Network+?

No. SEC Network+ is part of your pay TV subscription.
 
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Maryland was paid more than Rutgers because Maryland was making more money in the ACC than Rutgers was making in the Big East/AAC. Each school was guaranteed to not make less at any point in the Big Ten as they made in their former conferences. Nebraska had the same deal. What’s different is that Maryland and Rutgers have both borrowed money against future earnings and Nebraska never had to do that. Also, Maryland was given a one time payment for “travel expenses” that was “coincidentally” the amount of the ACC exit fee at the time. Whereas Nebraska became an equal revenue partner after their seven year buy in plan, Maryland and Rutgers will take longer. They also each had seven year buy in plans in place (Maryland’s was more per year per the reasoning above), but they have both chosen to borrow against future earnings so that they will each be repaying a loan from the Big Ten for a few more years after that.
 

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