OT - Online Classes/Degrees

Discussion in 'UConn Women's Basketball' started by DaddyChoc, May 24, 2012.

  1. DaddyChoc

    DaddyChoc His Chockishness

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    Do any of you guys have experiences with them? cheaper, more economical... positives and/or negatives?

    Is it quicker to get a degree or same time frame as going to a physical building?

    Devry, Phoenix etc

    thanks in advance
     
  2. sarals24

    sarals24 Lone Starlet

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    I am getting a grad degree from the University of Texas at Dallas that is partially online...I have one class a semester at the University and two or more online. It isn't any cheaper to take the class but when you factor in gas, parking fees, time cost, etc, online is much better (if you are good at time management)
     
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  3. alexrgct

    alexrgct Wise Guy

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    For-profit institutions like DeVry and Phoenix deserve a significant share of the blame for the existing student loan debt crisis in this country. They are extremely dangerous and are doing people a significant disservice.

    Getting specific training or certification from an institution like that is OK, but I would not get a degree from there.

    Online classes are becoming more and more accepted across the board. The flexibility, time savings, and parking/gas savings that Sara alludes to are legitimate. The primary downside is missing out on the opportunities to network with your classmates (depending on the nature of the degree and the class structure).
     
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  4. ~*Jen*~

    ~*Jen*~ Mommy to the Mini Mojo Keeper

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    I think it's... hard.

    To a point, it can be really convenient when you don't stay in the same place long enough. ;) We were living in central Georgia when my husband started his. He was working on his webMBA through a program offered through a consortium of Georgia colleges. Then he switched to a program (after only about a semester) more related to his bachelor's degree/profession. He was able to continue it when we moved to Atlanta and then to Huntsville.

    He was taking one class at a time. He'd come home from work around 5 and do nothing but study until he collapsed in bed at around 11:30. He was just SO consumed with it. He wasn't getting any exercise and gained a lot of weight.

    It was somewhat expensive. His then-employer would only reimburse a small portion and it seems like a lot of these programs just tend to be as expensive as they can be. Maybe under the assumption that employers pay a bigger portion than they do. His current employer would pay 100% of he were working on the degree now. Anyway, his then-employer just had no motivation to utilize the degree. He applied for other positions within the company and they refused to consider him and pay him more. So he finally got tired of it and left to work for a direct competitor, making about 25% more--and using this degree. Which is good because we owe a LOT of money for what wasn't covered.

    Online classes, in general, are hard, though. I took two during the summer before I graduated. It fit best with my work schedule. I'd wake up, study, nap, shower, go to work, come home, study until about 4AM (if I didn't work OT--if I did, I wasn't finished until 4AM anyway), sleep, study, et cetera. It might work for some people but I don't think I could actually do a whole degree that way. But maybe it's my personality...
     
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  5. sarals24

    sarals24 Lone Starlet

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    Yeah, the benefit to online classes are if they are something that requires lots of reading and not much discussion time in class, I've found. I'm doing a marketing degree, so anything that involves case studies, theory, current issues, etc, I would rather take in person because it is much better to learn and engage with the professor, speakers, other classmates, etc.

    But classes that involve straight reading or technical skills, it's easier to take at home and go at your own pace, I've found.
     
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  6. KnightBridgeAZ

    KnightBridgeAZ Grand Canyon Knight

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    While I don't think I would get a degree from one either, I think we can cast plenty of blame for the student loan debt crisis on the traditional schools. When you compare what it costs for a semester at a traditional college now versus what it cost 20 or 30 or more years ago - ok, I know times are different but the incrememtal increase compared to cost of living, average salaries, etc. simply can't be in line.

    And I saw some folks mentioning advanced degrees. While I lived in NJ I often received brochures from Rutgers advertising advanced business and management degrees. The costs were outragous for a normal person - even one earning what I consider a good salary. As someone above stated, I think there is a presumption that an employer is paying, which is probably less and less likely given the economy and employment practices.
     
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  7. JimGunther

    JimGunther

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    While I look at on-line programs with a great deal of skepticism, logic tells me, they COULD be the wave of the future.
    First, there's the cost issue. Proprietary schools are going to eye the bottom line more closely than traditional schools. Traditional schools are going to have to "get with the program". 8% - 10% or more year=t0-year increases are NOT going to be sustainable. Other than brand-recognition traditional universities will have to be more product competitive.
    Technology (such as Go-to-meeting ect) may allow more collaborative interaction (til recently, missing or limited from on-line deals).
     
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  8. alexrgct

    alexrgct Wise Guy

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    There's a difference between "significant" share of the blame and "exclusive".

    Really, lower tier universities have the same pitfalls as for-profit ones: ROI is out of whack with cost. And yes, even professionally valuable degree costs outstrip the rate of inflation. The problem is twofold. One is that professions that require highly skilled, in-person provisions of goods an services always increase in cost well above CPI. Concert tickets, a college degree, medical care, you name it. When a business can't move its production to locations with a comparative advantage, pricing goes up. The second issue is that, specific to higher education, there has been the over-availability of low-interest loans. Providing credit to fund the availability of a product or service causes a micro-inflationary effect. It can also cause significant bubbles, and education in general is one that's set to burst sooner rather than later.
     
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  9. Zorro

    Zorro Nuestro Zorro Amigo

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    You have to draw a total distinction between on-line courses from traditional universities which are definitely the wave of the future, and the highly advertised for-profit "schools" which more closely resemble used car dealers. They are mostly vultures, feeding on ignorance, student loans and the GI Bill. Their "education" is weak or non-existent, their 'degrees" are pretty much worthless and their profits are high.
     
  10. DaddyChoc

    DaddyChoc His Chockishness

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    is that a fact or an opinion? not that I'm disagreeing just though you could provide figures or links
     
  11. DaddyChoc

    DaddyChoc His Chockishness

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    and I just used Phx & Devry as examples of what the topic was about... there's tons of "online schools" out there that are not "highly advevrtised.
     
  12. Maine1

    Maine1 New Member

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    You can check out Charter Oak State College which is located in New Britain, CT. The courses are affordable around $700-$750 for a 3 credit class. Actually, I'm graduating from there on June 3rd. Best of luck in choosing a school.
     
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  13. Sakibomb25

    Sakibomb25 Yamasaki Let the Good Times Roll

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    It is my opinion that for-profit advanced degrees don't really do much for your career. I just got an MBA from a well-respected university in my area... and I'm still finding it more difficult to get a job. I can only imagine if I went to Phoenix or another for-profit university...

    Yes, it is much more convenient for people's schedules, but that is a short-term way of looking at things. The long-term view is how will your future employers/recruiters look at your education and my guess is that for-profit universities don't get much credit. I had an opportunity to work for a for-profit university and I declined. I don't really agree with what they stand for and describing them as vultures is really how I would sum them up.

    Again, this is only my opinion, so I apologize if I offended anyone.
     
  14. vtcwbuff

    vtcwbuff Civil War Buff

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    My daughter got her Phd on line (mostly) from a not for profit university. She holds down a full time job and she's also a mom. She would not have been able to do it if she had to attend classes on campus. Her employer split the tuition cost with her.

    I think it is going to become more and more common for grad students to continue their education on line.
     
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  15. DaddyChoc

    DaddyChoc His Chockishness

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    thanks Saki... I value your opinion
     
  16. DaddyChoc

    DaddyChoc His Chockishness

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    was everything done online?
     
  17. Icebear

    Icebear Andlig Ledare

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    My sister-in-law got her degree from Phoenix almost a decade ago in computer design she has a very good job in Manhattan as the result. As always once you have a degree your longterm success depends on your ability to demonstrate command of the material and how you have grown it.
     
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  18. Zorro

    Zorro Nuestro Zorro Amigo

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  19. Bestiarius

    Bestiarius

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    I learned nothing in college. "It was really kind of my own fault. I had a double-major: Psychology and Reverse Psychology. B. J. Novak
     
  20. Maine1

    Maine1 New Member

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    DaddyChoc,
    All of the courses are online. Here's there website address: charteroak.edu. Check to see if they offer a degree in the field you're interested. They are also an accredited school.
     
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